The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature

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Cambridge University Press, 1994 M08 26 - 231 páginas
C.S. Lewis' The Discarded Image paints a lucid picture of the medieval world view, as historical and cultural background to the literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. It describes the "image" discarded by later ages as "the medieval synthesis itself, the whole organization of their theology, science and history into a single, complex, harmonious mental model of the universe." This, Lewis' last book, was hailed as "the final memorial to the work of a great scholar and teacher and a wise and noble mind."
 

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - Michael_Godfrey - LibraryThing

Poor old Lewis, as a product of his time and place, is probably more a victim of time warp than the Medieval writers he so admires. His expectation, despite this being an "introduction" according to ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - luskwater - LibraryThing

Very helpful in clarifying the view of the world that information writers from Dante to Donne. Leer comentario completo

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Contenido

THE MEDIEVAL SITUATION
1
RESERVATIONS
13
SELECTED MATERIALS THE CLASSICAL PERIOD
22
A The Somnium Scipionis
23
B Lucan
29
C Statius Claudian and the Lady Natura
34
D Apuleius De Deo Socratis
40
SELECTED MATERIALS THE SEMINAL PERIOD
45
THE LONGAEVI
122
EARTH AND HER INHABITANTS
139
B Beasts
146
C The Human Soul
152
D Rational Soul
156
E Sensitive and Vegetable Soul
161
F Soul and Body
165
G The Human Body
169

A Chalcidius
49
B Macrobius
60
C PseudoDionysius
70
D Boethius
75
THE HEAVENS
92
B Their Operations
102
C Their Inhabitants
113
H The Human Past
174
I The Seven Liberal Arts
185
THE INFLUENCE OF THE MODEL
198
Epilogue
216
Index
224
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Acerca del autor (1994)

C. S. (Clive Staples) Lewis, "Jack" to his intimates, was born on November 29, 1898 in Belfast, Ireland. His mother died when he was 10 years old and his lawyer father allowed Lewis and his brother Warren extensive freedom. The pair were extremely close and they took full advantage of this freedom, learning on their own and frequently enjoying games of make-believe. These early activities led to Lewis's lifelong attraction to fantasy and mythology, often reflected in his writing. He enjoyed writing about, and reading, literature of the past, publishing such works as the award-winning The Allegory of Love (1936), about the period of history known as the Middle Ages. Although at one time Lewis considered himself an atheist, he soon became fascinated with religion. He is probably best known for his books for young adults, such as his Chronicles of Narnia series. This fantasy series, as well as such works as The Screwtape Letters (a collection of letters written by the devil), is typical of the author's interest in mixing religion and mythology, evident in both his fictional works and nonfiction articles. Lewis served with the Somerset Light Infantry in World War I; for nearly 30 years he served as Fellow and tutor of Magdalen College at Oxford University. Later, he became Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University. C.S. Lewis married late in life, in 1957, and his wife, writer Joy Davidman, died of cancer in 1960. He remained at Cambridge until his death on November 22, 1963.

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