The South in the Building of the Nation: History of the social life, ed. by S. C. Mitchell

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Julian Alvin Carroll Chandler, Franklin Lafayette Riley, James Curtis Ballagh, John Bell Henneman, Edwin Mims, Walter Lynwood Fleming, Samuel Chiles Mitchell
Southern historical publication society, 1909

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Términos y frases comunes

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Página 75 - A spirit of innovation is generally the result of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors.
Página 445 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Página 350 - Congress, the proceeds from the sale of these lands to be used for "the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college, where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies and including military tactics, to teach. such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts...
Página 474 - Because we hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth " that religion, or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence.
Página 236 - Virginia, have had it in their minds, and have proposed to themselves, to the end that the Church of Virginia may be furnished with a seminary of ministers of the gospel, and that the youth may be piously educated in good letters and manners, and that the Christian faith may be propagated among the Western Indians, to the glory of Almighty God...
Página 193 - Before and just after the Revolution, many, perhaps it would be more accurate to say most, of our youth of opulent families, were educated at English schools and universities. There can be no doubt their attainments in polite literature were very far superior to those of their contemporaries at the north, and the standard of scholarship, in Charleston was, consequently, much higher than in any other city on the continent.
Página 284 - It has been wisely ordered that light should have no color, water no taste, and air no odor ; so indeed, knowledge should be equally pure and without admixture of creed or cant. I move, therefore, that the surplus funds in the treasury be devoted to the establishment of an independent charity school for the poor.
Página 192 - That the person to be master of the said school shall be of the religion of the Church of England, and conform to the same, and shall be capable to teach the learned languages, that is to say, Latin and Greek tongues, and to catechise and instruct the youth in the principles of the Christian religion, as professed in the Church of England.
Página 38 - These Irish representatives of the Covenanters were in the west almost what the Puritans were in the northeast, and more than the Cavaliers were in the south. Mingled with the descendants of many other races, they nevertheless formed the kernel of the distinctively and intensely American stock who were the pioneers of our people in their march westward...
Página 284 - There may be intellectual food which the present state of society is not fit to partake of; to lay such before it would be as absurd as to give a quadrant to an Indian ; but knowledge is indeed as necessary as light, and ought to be as common as water and as free as air. It has been wisely ordained that light should have no color, water no taste, and air no odor ; so indeed, knowledge should be equally pure and without admixture of creed or cant.

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