Founding Friends: Families, Staff, and Patients at the Friends Asylum in Early Nineteenth-century Philadelphia

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Lehigh University Press, 2006 - 253 páginas
Founding Friends is a history of day-to-day life inside the Friends Asylum for the Insane in early nineteenth-century Philadelphia. It uses an extraordinarily rich data source: the daily diaries that the Asylum's lay superintendents kept between 1814 and 1850. In their diaries, these men wrote about their own and their attendant staff's work. They also write about their patients: their conditions, the moral remedies applied, the medical prescriptions ordered by consulting physicians, the reasons for chosen treatments, and the responses of patients and staff to the particular interventions. The Asylum's lay superintendents also wrote with unusual candor and detail about their own and their attendant staff's feelings: about the joys and the frustrations of working daily with insane patients. These diaries offer a new perspective on institutional life. This book shows how intricate negotiations and shifting alliances among families, communities, patients, and staff emerge as the most compelling determinants of an institution's changing form and function.
 

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Contenido

Founding Friends
33
A Virtual Domestic Space
53
The Family and the Asylum
78
The Asylum as Family
103
Staff Needs and Patient Care
130
The Ascendancy of the Medical Metaphor
153
Data on the Founders of the Friends of Asylum
175
Characteristics of the Patient Population of the Friends Asylum
188
Seclusion and Restraint at the Friends Asylum 181732
203
Notes
207
Bibliography
235
Index
247
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Página 36 - A people who had thus beat their swords into plough shares, with the bent of their spirits to this world, could not instruct their offspring in those statutes they had themselves forgotten. As every like begets its like, a generation was likely to succeed, formed upon other maxims, if the everlasting Father had not mercifully extended a visitation, to supply the deficiency of their natural parents.
Página 36 - Their fathers came into the country in its infancy, and bought large tracts of land for a trifle; their sons found large estates come into their possession, and a profession of religion which was partly national, which descended like the patrimony from their fathers and cost as little.
Página 236 - Asylum for the Relief of Persons deprived of the Use of their Reason.
Página 36 - Their fathers came into the country, and bought large tracts of land for a trifle; their sons found large estates come into their possession, and a profession of religion which was partly national, which descended like a patrimony from their fathers, and cost as little. They settled in ease and affluence, and whilst they made the barren wilderness as a fruitful field, suffered the plantation of God to be as a field uncultivated, and a desert.
Página 7 - ... obligations, as to utter a harsh word or use unnecessary force, no sensible man would consider the fact as enough to outweigh the numberless benefits conferred by these institutions. To expect that a young person without any extraordinary moral endowments, or any special preparation for the duty, can bear, day after day and hour after hour, week in and week out, the incessant and systematic efforts of one whose power for mischief is only heightened by disease, to teaze and irritate him and never...

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