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Annuities for Elderly Investors

On this page each month will be printed practical sug-
gestions to fit the needs of particular classes of investors

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AGE

MAN

WOMAN

$ 75.90

80

FEW months ago, in an article or even quadrupled without risk, few of dealing with investments for them would be inclined to hazard their women, the remark was made savings in 'blue sky' stocks or bonds." that if they were along in The annual return that can be secured

years their investment prob- from each $1,000 paid for a life annuity lems might be solved by the purchase of from leading American life insurance annuities from good life insurance com- companies at various ages is approxipanies. Since then several letters have mately as follows: been received from men as well as women asking for additional information re

50

$ 70.00 garding this form of investment. The

55
85.00

75.50 following came from a man in Oregon:

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98.70

85.90
65
117.10

101.40 I always read with interest the articles upon

70
139.85

124.35 the subject of investments that appear in

75
168.90

151.75 your publication, and should much appreciate

204.90

178.90 it could you in the near future spare the time

85
261.75

217:35 and space to discuss that of annuities.

I would like to ascertain to what class of Canadian companies, which have had people life annuities are especially desirable, longer experience with annuities and the advantages and disadvantages (if any) whose investments are of a character that of this form of investment, where annuities gives a higher yield, offer somewhat can be purchased and any other particulars larger returns than these. Women get that you might think best to give advice upon

less than men because they live longer. to those ignorant of this subject.

These payments continue for life and are In the World's Work for March, not subject to income tax until the full 1924, there was an article dealing with amount paid for the annuity has been annuities in which it was said: "For paid back. If there is anything left elderly people without dependents to at the death of the annuitant, it goes to whom they wish to leave their money, the company. There are other forms annuities offer a safe method of increasing than this life annuity, such as refund income without running the risk of losing annuities, where some of the principal both principal and income.” That article may come back to one's heirs; joint annuiquoted extensively from Mr. David Parks ties; annuities to provide for the old age Fackler, the dean of consulting actuaries of both husband and wife; and deferred in this country, who is not only an au- annuities. These latter can be purchased thority on annuities, but a purchaser of by younger people to provide an income them himself and a living example of the starting at a later date and continuing relative truth of the saying of insurance for life. This form is particularly suitmen that “annuitants never die.”

able for working women. Mr. Fackler recommended the purchase Many life insurance companies sell of annuities for elderly people suffering annuities, and it is possible for the from the high cost of living. Such people person interested in this form of investare most susceptible to the appeals of ment to get information from such fraudulent promoters, and Mr. Fackler sources. All the information the indisaid: “If they knew that by purchasing an- vidual needs to give the company, or nuities their life incomes could be doubled its agent, is the date of his or her birth.

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So many of the interesting things in the making of a magazine and the publishing of books neder get past the editors' desks that we have decided to devote a few pages every month to sharing some of them with our readers. These include an acquaintance with writers, letters from readers, and a miscellany of other things that may interest others as much as they interest us.-The EDITORS.

T

HE impression gleaned by many of his narrative of the search for the of our readers from “Prohibi- White Indians of the Darien Jungle, and tion As It Is" seems to be one Sir Philip Gibbs the third article of his of sorrowful disillusion. To story of “Tragic Europe."

them Rollin Lynde Hartt is It is interesting to reflect that Sir completing a bitter pilgrimage that is Philip, whose pen not so many years ago doing little save discourage the honest was among the more formidable weapons faith previously entertained by a large that eventually brought about the defeat public in the efficacy of this most dis- of the German Empire, was only lately a cussed of amendments. Touching this fêted guest in Berlin. The dispatches of opinion we have received much corre- Philip, Gibbs, war correspondent, posspondence. It is always welcome be it sessed in their vigorous descriptions estion whatever side of whatever discussion mates and opinions of embattled Gerinvolved, but we think it perhaps a little many that must have caused to grow in hard when a clerical gentleman brands us a

the hearts of her warriors and citizens, a powerfully as the outriders of a pernicious strong if not violent resentment. The host devoted to the chaotic dissolution of peaceful but lean years are now upon the country. A recent communication, Germany. Sir Philip Gibbs has lost not from California, we include in our columns a jot of his ability for incisive phrase and in no spirit save that of respect:

accurate observation. But the difference

lies in the response. In Berlin Gibbs is After reading the article “Prohibition As It fêted. Is” in your January number, one wonders what is the good of living. I should think Detroit would hang its head in shame. The Like Doughty of "Arabia Deserta" young are to be pitied. I have a nephew liv- fame and Wilfred Scawen Blunt who preing there, a young doctor, and I know he is ferred the sands and diamond brilliance good.

of Sheik El Obeyd in Egypt to the gentler OSSO

countryside of his native Sussex, Martin

Johnson, whom all readers of the World's In the World's Work for April, Work will remember as an explorer of unLangdon Warner will continue his ad- trodden places and notably as the man who ventures “Among Western China's Ban- made the wild animals of Africa act leaddits in Search of Earliest Art Treasures.” ing parts in moving pictures of his own Rollin Lynde Hartt contributes the fourth making, resides more or less permanently article of his series “Prohibition As It at Paradise Lake, a mysterious and fascinIs,” R. O. Marsh the second instalment ating bit of that dark continent. In the

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April issue he tells us more of his experi- movements lose heart or play politics, or in ences. His narrative will be accompanied some other way hamper the success of the by suitable African photographs.

movement.

Let us consider for a moment the difference

in preparation. The young man who plans to A last word about our Little Read

enter the law profession now must have four School Marm before she disappears in years of high school work, at least two years the cloud of correspondence that her of college, followed by three years of profeslittle readiness has provoked. It may

sional training and this is usually followed by well be our last chance anyway, for it

from one to five years in an office before he seems possible that her next appearance

goes into business for himself. Before he can will be in the role of erudition, the part practice at all, he must pass the state bar

examination. that originally she was cast to play. Dean W. F. Barr of the College of Edu

The young man planning to enter the medi

cal profession, must be a high school graduate cation at Drake University in Des Moines,

with at least two years of college work, which Iowa, is certainly the best qualified of all is followed by four years of professional those who have communicated with us training and this usually by one or two years in her behalf, to speak of her needs and of internship. problems.

The teacher's qualifications in most states

are determined by a minimum age standard To the Editor, World's Work.

and ability to pass certain examinations makSir: I was very much interested in reading ing at least a minimum average grade. the little article in the December number of We have at the present time in Iowa some the World's Work called “The Little Read thousands of teachers without positions. The School Marm," and I am writing to say that same condition exists in other Mid-Western educational leaders and organizers are them states. Naturally a very large percentage of selves very largely responsible for conditions these teachers are in the lowest scale of qualithat exist as they are set forth in this article. fications, but unfortunately some of those

It was my privilege a little while ago to having the low standard of qualifications are write a letter to the Research Bureau of the able to get the positions that should go to Bureau of Education, calling attention to the those who are better prepared. thing that I am mentioning here, but the re If one says anything about the increase of sponse, while it indicated proper interest in salaries, he is met with the statement that there better preparation, did not concede that prep are plenty of teachers and that many are now aration is the basic thing.

getting more than they are worth, which is There has been a plea for better salaries, true. for teachers' pensions, for permanence in posi Parents do love their children. They tions, and it has been shouted from the house rightly consider them the dearest earthly tops that the teaching profession can never be possessions. Parents are easily reached what it should be until in these things it can through a concerted plea for better trained be placed on a level with other professions teachers, because they will readily see that such as law and medicine.

this better training means much for the Now the fact is that lawyers and doctors children. That is a plea for the children and have proceeded in a much more business-like not for the teacher's private interest. way than have the teachers in bringing about We talk psychology, we say that we teach their recognition. Their organizations have psychology, but do we really practice it? put the pressure not on higher fees but on I have been teaching a good many years higher standards of preparation. They have and have taught for as little as twenty-four in this way been able to put certain limitations dollars a month, but I do not have much on the number of people who get into the pro sympathy for the plea that the state ought to fession simply by making it harder to get in. establish minimum salaries as long as those With teachers this has not been the case. asking for minimum salary standards object Whenever an effort is made to raise the stand to having the state establish some reasonable ard of preparation for entering the teaching minimum standard of qualification. profession the chief objection that is met to I appreciate the excellent articles in the such efforts is among the teachers themselves, World's Work, and wish you success in the and those who are the leaders in educational great work that you are doing.

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THE MARCH OF EVENTS

573 An Editorial Interpretation PERSONALITIES (Illustrated)

590 Colonel James A. Logan, Jr., Diplomat

The Interchangeable l'an Sweringens
MARTIN JOHNSON'S STORY, AND His New PICTURES OF WILD ANIMALS IN
AFRICA -

Martin Johnson 599 Can CaillAUX RETURN TO POWER?

Raymond Recouly 621 The War Exile Enters Politics Again New FEUDS IN THE DEMOCRATIC Party

Mark Sullivan 627 The Immediate Need for Reorganization THE MYSTERY OF THE WHITE INDIANS

R. O. Marsh 633 The Second Article of a Series AMID WESTERN China's BANDITS IN SEARCH OF Earliest Art TREASURES III. Down the Etsingol to the City of Marco Polo

Langdon Warner 646 L'ROHIBITION As It Is -

Rollin Lynde Hartt 661 IV. Rivers of Beer on the Atlantic Seaboard THE PRINCE OF THREE CAREERS (Book Review)

Cameron Rogers 668 The Silent REVOLUTION ON THE RAILROADS

John K. Barnes 673 REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE BONDS

679 WEED OUT THE CALLABLE BONDS

681 The World's WORKSHOP

682 Glimpses Behind the Scenes in the Editor's Office

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Copyright, 1925, in the l'nited States, Vwfoundland, Great Britain, and other countries by Doubleday, Page & Co. All rights reserved. Title

registered in U. 8. Patent Omice. TERJS: $1.00 a year; single copies 35 cents; Canadian postage 60 cents extra ; foreign $1.00 F... DOLBLEDAY, President NELSON DOUBLEDAY, Virr. President

S. A. EVERITT, Treasurer
ARTHI'R W, PAGE, Vice-President
RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY, Secretary

JOHN J. HESSIAN, A88't. Treasurer

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WILLIAM GREEN The new President of the American Federation of Labor, who was fifty-two years old on March 3rd. He has been active in the affairs of the United Mine Workers of America and the A. F. of L. for twenty-five years, and as a member of the Ohio State Senate he drew up the Ohio Workmen's Compensation Law.

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