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leisurely. Pultizer died at sixty-four, Of the three, Steed the journalistworn out by his own violent energies, and diplomat, Pulitzer the journalist-magnate, with his own voice prompted the fading and Mitchell the journalist and editor, diminuendo of his existence.

title unqualified by diplomacy or finance, Leise, ganz leise, ganz leise.

it is unquestionably the latter who makes As his biographer writes: “He who all the best reading. Lacking the significance his life had ridden upon the storm, left of the other two, the history to be found it as gently as the dying of the wind.” in Steed, the dynamic personality sketched

in the Seitz biography, the Mitchell MITCHELL'S CHARMING STYLE

Memoirs* possess to a greater extent that DWARD P. MITCHELL, formerly one indispensable attribute of letters, a

editor-in-chief of the New York distinguished and a charming prosody. Sun, completes perfectly this trilogy of

VILLIERS THE WAR EAGLE editorial and journalistic types. Mr. Mitchell differs from Steed in that his F YET another type of the journalist editing of contemporary events was whose work it is that furnishes the achieved at his desk and like Pulitzer, in daily news, was that king of all journalistthe labyrinthine subtleties of European adventurers, Frederic Villiers.f In 1851, statecraft he took neither part nor par- eight years after Sir Charles Napier in one ticular interest. Unlike Pulitzer, how- of the many campaigns of India, had ever, Mitchell did not build newspapers captured the Province of Sind and had nor did he, spluttering and detonating, ac- tersely and wittily wired the tidings back tively participate in American politics. to the British War Office in the one word Genially, gracefully and always interest- Peccavi, a boy was born in London who ingly, he tells us the accumulated ex- was to witness and in some measure to periences and anecdotes of half a century participate in more wars and in more of American journalism, introduces us to fighting than any soldier of his generation the Homeric Dana, to Laffan, to a pre- or of the preceding or of the following one. posterous whimsy of a character, George Apparently uncursed with nerves or Francis Train, to a score of others, and in anything approaching physical fear, he was conclusion we are left with a profound present at the battle of Plevna in 1877 regret that the editorial page of the Sun and numbered among his friends Skobeleff or indeed that of any paper should be the “White General,” that Comet-like bereft of such a charming pen and wise leader of horse, and Baker Pasha, the and lovable personality.

Russian's skilful enemy. Later he turned Infinitely more than with Steed we up in India and assisted in a few brushes become intimately acquainted with the in the passes with the Pathans, always man himself and as he obviously rejoices welcomed in whatever far and lonely enin these friends of his, remarkable men, campment he stumbled and always coolly all of them, so in no less fashion do we. at hand when the knives or the MartiniAnd his style cheers one like wine. There

There Henries went into action. are, for instance, those lines wherewith For a few years of what seemed to him he describes Mr. Dana in action. "He an inexcusably boring peace he wandered worked easily, rapidly, decisively, but about England and the United States, always without any feeling of pressure or in the former country being entertained mental effort. In his technical practice by his sovereign and discoursing war and there was a noticeable absence of the its merits with distinguished generals. contortions and sputterings and squeaks As a war-artist of considerable merit his of labor-pain sometimes seen and heard services were always at a premium with when Mr. Greeley was in action.” How delightful that the great Mr.

*“Memoirs of an Editor." By Edward P.

Mitchell. Scribner's. $10. Greeley should have squeaked and sput

† "Villiers: His Five Decades of Adventure." By tered, but how curiously inevitable. Frederic Villiers. Harper's. $6.

454

Journalism Plus Romance

the London journals and at the first dark- Nilghai, and for Keneu, called as may ening of the skies with the war-cloud Villiers be called “The Great War Eagle." Villiers made off toward the red center of Kipling's description of the fight at dawn things with all possible dispatch. The when the spearmen of Osman Digna, Balkans were particularly fertile in the mad-drunk with bhang and visions of form of activity that he loved and his their prophet's Paradise of Peris, demartial, almost Gascon distinction of port stroyed the time-honored impregnability became so well-known an adjunct, even a of a British Square, is based in every forerunner, of war, that the monarchs of respect upon the actual experience of those near-eastern nations it was said, Villiers. Then, too, he saw Burnaby of were wont to prepare for trouble at a Khiva fame and one of the last and most rumour of his appearance in their capitals. renowned of England's "beaux sabreurs" Villiers, the War Eagle, became a charac go down at Abu Klea before the emirs of ter well-known to the soldiers of many the Mahdi, as they with the horsemen of regiments in many armies, soldiers who the Baggara, swept in upon the squares. fell in battles from Plevna to the Marne, At sixty-three Villiers was in France along the steaming sandy wastes of Tel-el- and running with singularly unselfconkebir, and Abu Klea, and Omdurman, but scious intrepidity the chance of demoliunlike them, he went on forever, missing tion by shells the like of which even his death by inches, to die after witnessing incomparable experience knew nothing. the greatest of all wars, peacefully in the Another war, the greatest war of the lot; peace times that he hated, of old age and one can imagine him thanking God for a certain weariness of life.

having allowed him to live to see it, this

rose, this very jewel among wars. For A FIGURE OF PURE ROMANCE

those who desire to believe that behind S A figure of pure romance, to be this and that report of troubles in the

Balkans, in Morocco or in the remoter liers ranks as highly as do Steed and Pu corners of the East, there exists a rolitzer and Mitchell in their chosen fields. mance as glamorous as that which surAs an artist it is possible that he was a rounds the names of Roland, of Bayard, mediocrity, as a correspondent only mod or of Hiram the just, Villiers is the man erately able, but as an adventurous and for them, the one figure in the journalism fearless observer of mankind at war, as a of the last fifty years who will utterly character in which D'Artagnan and Sir convince them that what they had alJohn Hawkwood shared equally attrac ways hoped was true is indeed so. tive parts, Villiers the War Eagle was There are, obviously enough, others alone in excellence. One would only won beside these men who have been active der why he preferred the periphery of and notable influences behind the news engagements to official action and the of this and other countries. There were Queen's coat, save that, though of warrior Watterson and Whitelaw Reid and Kohlfibre, he transcended the mere military in saat and in England the fascinating and his spirit of sheer joy in excitement and forceful figure of Alfred Harmsworth, the clash of arms. There were too many Lord Northcliffe. Each possessed his wonderful wars to go to for him to tie sphere wherein his was the domination himself down to the army of any one and his the authority but these spheres nation, and besides all those that he at have all of them been parts and parts only tended he enjoyed to the full in the middle of the one central body-journalism. The of their every action.

men behind the news, like the builders of It was one of Villiers' distinctions to

great empires, complete their work and serve as the model for Rudyard Kipling's go, but the news like an empire that is wellDick Heldar in "The Light that Failed." constructed, continues from generation And it would seem, not only for Heldar, to generation to perform its indispensbut in some measure for Torpenhow, the able functions.

A

THE WORLD'S WORKSHOP

So many of the interesting things in the making of a magazine and the publishing of books never get past the editors' desks that we have decided to devote a few pages every month to sharing some of them with our readers. These include an acquaintance with writers, letters from readers, and a miscellany of other things that may interest others as much as they interest us.—THE EDITORS.

TE

HE Little Read School Marm," absentees that the attendance officer cannot Ernest Greenwood's article manage in order that her school may not be published in the World's Work

discredited. Besides there are professional for December, proved in the

books and school journals to be read, correfinal analysis of publication, spondence and summer school courses to be

taken and supervisors and other officials to anything but little read itself. It went

be propitiated. The trouble with the school boldly into the cave of controversy and

marm is not that the salary is insufficient, but awakened that hydra-headed phenome that the race has not produced enough supernon, with interesting and instructive re

humans to fill all school positions. When sults. Little read our school marm may science has done her perfect work—perhaps a possibly be but she lacks not the energy hundred generations hence, there may have to point out why she is.

been evolved a class of beings who can meet all these demands and also be well read.

ISIC This letter from St. Michaels, Maryland, sums up the case for the defense in

Tyler Dennett, author in this issue of a fashion suggestive not only of consider- the article “Could T. R. Have Stopped able reading but also of a knowledge of the War?" is an authority on subjects forensic debate. The writer most assured- chiefly of Oriental or Near Eastern conly idles not her time away.

nection. He has traveled widely and is

in close touch with problems of national Why Is the School Marm Little Read? or international significance. He now Because she has to use her time and brain lectures on American history at Johns making records and reports, working out scien- Hopkins University and lives in Washingtific tests, holding meetings of patrons and ton, D. C. community clubs, correcting pupils' work, giving demonstration lessons to illustrate the new method of Professor X, and a little later, To the WORLD'S WORK for March giving demonstrations to show that the X Chester H. Rowell will contribute his method is psychological and unpedagogical fourth article on American Government, and the "new" method of Professor Y is

and Sir Philip Gibbs the second of his psychological and pedagogically correct-and in turn demonstrate that Professor Y is wrong

series on the Europe of to-day. Rollin and Professor Z is right and so on until she Lynde Hartt's third article on “Progets back to Professor A and starts round

hibition As It Is," and the first instalagain. Then she must hold entertainments

ment of R. O. Marsh's story of the White to raise money for school purposes, hold con Indians will appear, and Arthur Chapferences with individual parents and bring in man's story of the Colorado Tunnel,

456

The World's Work at School

which has finally made Denver and the library carries may periodicals on its subWestern route therefrom a practical suc scription list, including the World's WORK.

But there is a vast difference between reading cess.

a magazine in a library and literally tearing Os so

it to pieces in the classroom—and I mean just We are undecided as to whether our

that. Los Angeles correspondent has, like her

For instance, the marvelous Russian prints

are now mounted and on my bulletin boardMaryland colleague, read Ernest Greenwood's article, for she rails neither against of vivid color. After seeing them fairly

surrounded, between periods, by many lovers it nor against us, she contributes no dis- gloating over these lovely copies, one could cussion of it and omits it from the list of

not justly say that our youngsters are inarticles in the World's Work that have terested only in the suggestive cover designs pleased her. We must, somewhat regret- and contents of some of our more sensational fully, conclude that as yet "The Little magazines. Read School Marm" has not met her eye

My eighth grade civics classes are simply and we can only hope that even after it delighted with “City Streets of America." has, her opinion of the magazine will re

And why not, as we are at present deep in

the fascinating subjects of civic beauty and main the same. But will it? Green

But will it? Green- city planning? To these same classes I have wood's is a forceful pen and it was em

read Edward Bok's “The Greatest Word in ployed upon a subject bound in any case

the English Language," and I wish that the to arouse discussion in no way free from alarmists of the day could have seen the seriprejudice and lusty bias. It would be the ous expression on the majority of the faces and soundest tribute to his article if in addi- heard the enthusiastic and intelligent discustion to the things remarked upon in this sion that followed. It is in just such an letter “The Little Read School Marm” article as this one that we find to a certain might secure honorable mention, and we

degree at least the counter-irritant of the dance await with more than a little interest palace and the cheap show. further correspondence from Los Angeles. renewed inspiration from the revelations of the

My ancient history classes have received excavations at Ur and it has given ancient

history a new and modern tinge which delights To the Editor, World's Work.

their most up-to-date souls. Sir: I do feel so sincerely that the World's Even the journalism classes benefited from Work is filling a very big place now in current the issue as I sent “The Canons of Journalism" history and citizenship that may I take your over to the teacher, who posted it on her board. time just to review what these last two issues And lastly, my little B8's completed the have done for me and my classes? I am teach- surgical operation by cutting out the colored ing history and civics in one of the junior high ads, the eagles on the covers, and one of the schools of Los Angeles. Magazines of your Russian pictures, for the scrapbook which kind do not find their way to any great extent they are making for the children's hospital as into the homes of my pupils—though our their Christmas gift this year.

ONE OF THE RANK AND FILE

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MARCH, 1925
FRONTISPIECE: George E. Baker
THE MARCH OF EVENTS

An Editorial Interpretation
A THIRD TERM FOR COOLIDGE?

Mark Sullivan 471 BAD BUGS AND GOOD Bugs

Vernon Kellogg 477 BLOND INDIANS OF THE DARIEN JUNGLE

R. O. Marsh 483 WHITE INDIANS WITH Yellow Hair (Photographs)

491 PERSONALITIES (Illustrated):

498 Charles R. Knight, Artist

Walter S. Gifford, Executive PROHIBITION As It Is

Rollin Lynde Hartt 507 III. St. Louis-The Dry South-Washington AMID WESTERN CHINA's BANDITS IN SEARCH OF EARLIEST ART TREASURES II. Through Kansu Province

Langdon Warner

514 Rock Cut CHAPELS OF ANCIENT CHINA (Photographs)

523 THE HOMES OF OUR ANCESTORS (Photographs)

526 Views from the New American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art LABOR ORGANIZATIONS AS CapitaLISTS

Philip Snowden

539 PRINCES AND PAUPERS IN GERMANY

Sir Philip Gibbs 541 Second Article in the Series "Tragic Europe" Books That TRAVEL

Adelaide Evans Harris 550 THE NEXT STEP IN WASHINGTON

Chester H. Rowell

553 IV. Cabinet Members in Congress THE GENTLEMEN ADVENTURERS (Book Reviews)

Cameron Rogers 561 The OUTLOOK FOR MUNICIPAL Bonds ANNUITIES FOR ELDERLY INVESTORS

566

568 The World's WORKSHOP

569 Glimpses Behind the Scenes in the Editor's Office

Copyright, 1925, in the l'nited States, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and other countries hy Doubleday. Page & Co. All rights reserved. Title

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S. 1. EVERITT, Treasurer
ARTHRW. PAGE, T' - President
RUSSELL DOUBLEDLY, Spritory

JOHN J. HESSIAN **'t. Treasurer

Dombleday, Page & Co.

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