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bers of a prominent baseball club were secular magazine turning attention to such a accused of corruption and deprived of subject as tithing. their share in the World's Series money.

A few years since, inspired by the Centenary And four years ago occurred the lamen

Movement in the Methodist Episcopal Church table and ever to be regretted scandal that

and kindred enterprises in other denominaleft another World's Series as mud

tions, much space was given to the subject of

Christian Stewardship in the Church papers. bespattered as the principals of a recent

At the present time the religious press is almost Cabinet exposé.

silent on that topic, with consequent woeful Jack Dempsey once told us that, while loss in income and greatly imperiled benevolent boxing was usually honest, wrestling enterprises. I am wondering whether this is might often be practiced with an eye to to prove another case in which the Church illegal gain; but yet another and older through neglect is to surrender a good thing to pugilist admitted to having "taken one

outside influences. This, as you know, has on the jaw” more times than once and

been characteristic of the Christian Church. collected to his profit. Amateur sports

Pre-occupation with theological controversy

has resulted in neglect of duty and privilege seem far more antiseptic, but there have

in one direction after another, until outside been college teams accused of paying movements of necessity have arisen to fill the young men to play with them and col need. leges here and there whose athletes, it Why the many fraternal societies? The has been hinted, were drawn to them by opening chapters of the Book of Acts make offers of free tutelage and board. So who clear that the early Church was a perfectly can tell? If any one, Walter Camp, who satisfying brotherhood. William Booth was might well be called the dean of American

the truest son of John Wesley of the past athletics, is able to do so. He has his

hundred years, but found it necessary to orfinger pretty well on the pulse of sport in ganize the Salvation Army because Wesley's

followers had lost their founder's passion for general in this country. His article,

the down-and-out classes. "How Clean is Sport,” will appear in an The rise of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. early issue.

testify to the neglectful attitude of the denominational bodies toward the physical and

social requirements of young men and women. “Men Who Tithe,” by William G. Christian Science is here because mentally Shepherd, appeared in the World's sick folks were not taught by the organized Work for July. Many people have writ

Church to realize the physical benefits that ten asking either for the names of those belong to a robust Christian faith. who have tithed to the generous develop

Philanthropic foundations spring up outside ment of their material and spiritual lives,

the Church because a philanthropically vision

less Church offers no medium through which or for a fuller exposition of the theory.

to carry on such humanitarian work on a The article has proved itself of genuine great scale. significance in a day when only a fortu “Partnership with God” is a doctrine that nate few are able to find in their beliefs of right belongs to the Church. I am wonsustenance for the spirit and courage for dering if history is about to repeat itself and the direction of their lives. Mr. Connell

Mr. Connell this good thing to be so neglected by organized contributes a valuable bit of appreciation Christianity that men must needs learn its and the points he makes are of real practice elsewhere. Verily “the children of interest.

this world are in their generation wiser than

the children of light.” To lhe Editor, World's Work.

I assure you that such articles as “Men Who Sir: I wish to express great appreciation Tithe" and World's Work editorial comof the recent article in World's Work on ments are appreciated more than religious “Men Who Tithe.” Just now it is a whole

editors are aware. some sign of the times to observe a so-called

Geo. S. CONNELL.

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Rollin Lynde Hartt 265

JANUARY, 1925
FRONTISPIECE: SENATOR WILLIAM E. BORAH
The MARCH OF EVENTS

An Editorial Interpretation
HUNTINGTON's Gift TO THE Nation

(Photographs of the Museum and Art Treasures) PERSONALITIES:

Thomas D. Campbell, Business-Farmer
Dr. Reginald Harris, Biologist

Colonel A. B. Barber, Traffic Expert
PROHIBITION As It Is

I. Hoboken-Buffalo-Detroit
EVERY WORKER A CAPITALIST
How HUMAN TRAITS ARE INHERITED
SHAKESPEARE'S APPEAL TO BROADWAY
A GREAT YEAR IN AMERICAN SPORT (Photographs)
THE NEXT STEP IN WASHINGTON

11. Party Responsibility and Personal Leadership
How CLEAN Is SPORT? - -
GONE IS BRITISH FEAR OF SOVIETISM
LOOKING BACK ON LA FOLLETTE
FOREIGN GOVERNMENT BONDS

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Walter Camp 319 Arnold Bennett 322 Mark Sullivan 324

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Cameron Rogers 335

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Glimpses Behind the Scenes in the Editor's Office

Copyright, 1924, in the United States, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and other countries by Doubleday, Page & Co. All rights

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NELSON DOUBLEDAY, Vice-President S. A. EVERITT, Treasurer ARTICR W. PAGE, Vice-President RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY, Secretary

JOHN J. HESSIAN, Ass't. Treasurer

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A

LMOST
one hundred

years

Senatorial candidate, two years ago, was ago, a new period began in 160,000, returns to Washington with a American history which has majority of 755 votes. ever since been known as the It is absurd to maintain, after this ex

era of good feeling.” Presi- hibition at the polls, that “blocs,” and dent Monroe's reëlection in 1820, when the things they represent, are popular he received every vote of the Electoral with the American rank-and-file. The College except one, marked the virtual spirit of the nation still insists on organidisappearance of political parties and zation and order. It has taken a strong political factionalism and made possible stand in favor of the political party as an the coöperation of all public spirited agency of legislation and government. groups in the important work of develop- The fear, which has recently found wideing the new country. Properly con- spread expression, that the political sidered, Mr. Coolidge's recent triumph party was breaking up in the United was almost as unanimous as President States, and that Congress, divided into Monroe's a century ago. Leaving out antagonistic groups, would present a the Solid South, which, for such com- picture of helplessness and demoralizaparisons, should properly be ignored, tion not unlike that of the parliaments of Mr. Coolidge carried every state except Continental Europe, is now seen to have Wisconsin. The rebuke everywhere ad- been groundless. That there will be eviministered to the insurrectionary ele- dences of independence in the new Conments in his own party should make for gress may be taken for granted, yet it is Republican harmony. Senator La Fol- absurd to suppose that the emphatic lette has disappeared as an influential voice of the American people, registerforce in American politics. His power in ing a protest against the disharmonies the present Congress must greatly weaken that have marked recent legislative proafter this demonstration of the slight cedures in Washington, will not exert a extent to which he exercises influence restraining influence upon the proceedoutside of the State of Wisconsin. Sen- ings of the next few months. ator Brookhart, whose majority as a Certainly few Presidents have had the

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Another “Era of Good Feeling"

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opportunity that the recent election has auspices therefore are favorable for one given Mr. Coolidge. He is President no of the most successful administrations longer by accident, but by the free and in American history. Above all, it is overwhelming choice of his countrymen. time for another “era of good feeling.” Out of the six Vice-Presidents who have succeeded to the Presidency, he is only Senator Lodge's Place in History the second who has obtained a reëlection. If Mr. Coolidge had any sense of insecur- T IS impossible, at this time, to fix ity before, there need be no reason why the place of Henry Cabot Lodge in he should feel unsupported now. The the American story. It is almost as election has made him the unquestioned difficult as to fix that of Woodrow Wilson. leader of his party.

Despite the fact that Senator Lodge's pubThe lesson of the last session of Con- liccareer covered forty years of our national gress is the necessity for such leadership. life and that he became associated with It is not likely that the experience has many of the most interesting men and been wasted upon the President. The ac- the most stirring events of his time, claim that greeted the Coolidge Message history will know him for his particito Congress a year ago was caused by the pation in a scene in which President definiteness with which the President Wilson was the other most conspicuous marked out his legislative program, as actor. The repudiation of the Treaty well as the excellent features of the pro- of Versailles and the League of Nations gram itself. What the nation applauded by the United States Senate-as that was the capacity for leadership which exciting achievement takes its place, in this message indicated, and such criticisms the perspective of the next hundred as were visited upon the President as the years, as one of the blessings of modern Congressional session continued were history, or one of its most lamentable inspired by the belief that he had not mistakes, will Senator Lodge be regarded vigorously enforced his leadership. The as a worker of good or of ill. President spectacle presented was not a new one Wilson's fame rests largely upon the same in American politics; it again illustrated, decision. indeed, the weakest spot in the American On the personal side Senator Lodge's system, the lack of coördination between career of course has the utmost interest. the legislative and the executive depart- His contact with American politics dates ments. Congress rewrote the President's from James G. Blaine and has been contax scheme, it overrode his bonus veto tinuous since that date. There were few -indeed, it almost consistently ignored Americans of importance during that the influence of the White House. It is period whom he had not known at first not too much to say that Mr. Coolidge's hand, and with whom he had not had reputation as a statesman will be gauged close contact. Probably no American entirely by the extent to which he makes Senator of his time had so many friends himself the leader of the Republican and correspondents among European party, initiates a plan of legislation that statesmen. It is doubtful whether even measurably meets the public needs, and the mind of Roosevelt was so complete develops the personal force that carries a storehouse of American events during this plan through Congress. The ad- the period in which it was most active. vantages are now all on his side. The It was in the field of foreign affairs, a party has a majority, though a slight one, field unfamiliar to most Americans, that in the Senate, and a much larger one in Senator Lodge was most expert. It has the House. The nation has shown its been said that his attitude toward Presiconfidence in the President by a vote of dent Wilson's peace negotiations was huge proportions; that the victory was prompted by wounded vanity and perprimarily a Coolidge victory, and not a sonal spite. Perhaps a more accurate Republican victory, is self-evident. The statement would be that he regarded

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