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" Not the fruit of experience, but experience itself, is the end. A counted number of pulses only is given to us of a variegated, dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest senses? How shall we pass most swiftly from... "
Miscellanies, Political and Literary - Página 37
por Sir Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant Duff - 1878 - 315 páginas
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The Eagle: A Magazine, Volumen18

1895
...of his book on the Renaissance — " the service of philosophy, and of religion and culture as well, to the human spirit, is to startle it into a sharp...dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest senses ? How can we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present...
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Studies in the History of the Renaissance

Walter Pater - 1873 - 213 páginas
...ist dephlegmatisiren, vivificiren. The service of philosophy, and of religion and culture as well, to the human spirit, is to startle it into a sharp...dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest senses ? How can we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volumen114

1873
...moment only. Not the fruit of experience, but experience itself, is the end. A counted number of puhes only is given to us of a variegated, dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be feon in them by the finest senses ? How can we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volumen19;Volumen82

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1874
...motion and agitation, should never rest, but continually energize. What is this but a reading 2,000 years old of the maxims of one of our latest teachers...given to us of a variegated, dramatic life. How may \vc see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest senses ? How can we pass most swiftly...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volumen42;Volumen105

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1885
...his Sensations and Ideas, by Walter Pater, MA, Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford. 2 vols. tion — not the fruit of experience, but experience itself...counted number of pulses only is given to us of a varied dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest sense ? We...
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The Renaissance: Studies in Art and Poetry

Walter Pater - 1888 - 252 páginas
...eager observation. Every moment some form grows perfect in hand or face; some tone on the hills or the sea is choicer than the rest; some mood of passion...dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest senses ? How shall we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present...
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The Eagle: A Magazine Support by Members of St. John's College, Volumen18

1895
...mood of passion or insight or intellectual excitement is irresistibly real and attractive for us—for that moment only. Not the fruit of experience, but...dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest senses ? How can we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present...
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The Life of the Spirit in the Modern English Poets, Volumen10

Vida Dutton Scudder - 1895 - 349 páginas
...the fruit of experience, but experience itself is the end," writes an apostle of the new renaissance. "A counted number of pulses only is given to us of...dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen by the finest senses? How shall we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present always...
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The Life of the Spirit in the Modern English Poets

Vida Dutton Scudder - 1895 - 349 páginas
...the fruit of experience, but experience itself is the end," writes an apostle of the new renaissance. "A counted number of pulses only is given to us of...dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen by the finest senses? How shall we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present always...
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The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll (Rev. C.L. Dodgson)

Stuart Dodgson Collingwood - 1898 - 448 páginas
...Mr. Dodgson. Walter Pater, in his book on the Renaissance, says (I quote from rough notes only), " A counted number of pulses only is given to us of...dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to be seen in them by the finest senses ? How shall we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present...
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