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should omit their duties, in not delivering the prisoners at the dayes and places appointed, that then there should a course be taken by the soveraignes, that what chiefe officer soever should offend herein, hee himself should be delivered and detained, till hee had made good what the commissioners had agreed upon.

"The English officers did punctually, at the day and place, deliver their prisoners, and so did most of the officers of Scotland; only the Lord of Bocleuch and Sir Robert Kerr were faultie. They were complained of, and new dayes appointed for the delivery of their prisoners. Bocleuch was the first that should deliver; and hee failing, entered himself prisoner into Barwicke, there to remaine till those officers under his charge were delivered to free him. Hee chose for his guardian Sir William Selby, master of the ordnance at Barwicke. When Sir Robert Kerr's day of delivery came, hee failed too, and my Lord Hume, by the king's command, was to deliver him prisoner into Barwicke upon the like terms, which was performed. Sir Robert Kerr (contrary to all men's expectation) chose mee for his guardian, and home I brought him to my own house, after he was delivered to mee. I lodged him as well as I could, and tooke order for his diet, and men to attend on him, and sent him word that (although by his harsh carriage towards mee, ever since I had that charge, he could not expect any fayour, yet) hearing so much goodness of him, that hee

never broke his worde, if hee would give mee his hand and credit to be a true prisoner, hee would have no guard sett upon him, but have free liberty for his friends in Scotland to have ingress and regress to him as oft as hee pleased. Hee tooke this very kindly at my handes, accepted of my offer, and sent mee thankes.

"Some four dayes passed; all which time his friends came into him, and hee kept his chamber. Then hee sent to mee, and desired mee, I would come and speake with him, which I did; and after a long discourse, charging and re-charging one another with wrong and injuries, at last, before our parting, wee became good friends, with greate protestations, on his side, never to give mee occasion of unkindnesse again. After our reconciliation, hee kept his chamber no longer, but dined and supt with mee. I tooke him abroad with mee at the least thrice a-weeke, a hunting, and every day wee grew better friends. Bocleuch, in a few days after, had his pledges delivered, and was set at liberty. But Sir Robert Kerr could not get his, so that I was commanded to carry him to Yorke, and there to deliver him prisoner to the archbishop, which accordingly I did. At our parting, hee professed greate love unto mee for the kind usage I had shown him, and that I would find the effects of it upon his delivery, which hee hoped would be shortly.

“Thus wee parted; and, not long after, his pledges

were gott, and brought to Yorke, and hee sett at liberty. After his retourne home, I found him as good as his word. Wee met oft at dayes of truce, and I had

'as good justice as I could desire; and so wee continued very kinde and good friends, all the tyme that I stayed în that March, which was not long."

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APPENDIX, No. III.

MAITLAND'S COMPLAYNT,

AGAINST

THE THIEVIS OF LIDDISDAIL.

FROM PINKERTON'S EDITION, COLLATED WIth a Ms. of MAITLAND'S POEMS, IN THE LIBRARY OF EDINBURGH

COLLEGE.

OF Liddisdail the common theifis1

Sa peartlie stellis2 now and reifis,3
That nane may keip

Horse, nolt, nor scheip,5

Nor yett dar sleip

For their mischeifis.

1 Thieves. Steal.-3 Rob.- Black cattle; oxen. Sheep.

Thay plainly throw the country rydis,
I trow1 the mekil devil thame gydis!
Quhair they onsett,

Ay in thair gait,2

Thair is na yet3

Nor dor thame bydis.*

Thay leif richt nocht, quhair ever thay ga;
Their can na thing be hid them fra;

For gif men wald

Thair housis hald,
Than wax they bald,

To burne and slay.

Thay theifis have neirhand herreit" hail

Ettricke forest and Lawderdail;

Now are they gane,

In Lawthiane ;

And spairis nane

That thay will waill.8

Thay landis ar with stouth' sa socht,
To extreame povertye ar broucht,
Thay wicked scrowis 10

Has laid the plowis,11

7

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