The English Novel

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J.M. Dent & Sons Limited, 1924 - 319 páginas
 

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Página 83 - ... a new species of writing, that might possibly turn young people into a course of reading different from the pomp and parade of romance-writing, and dismissing the improbable and marvellous, with which novels generally abound, might tend to promote the cause of religion and virtue.
Página 281 - To match that — it would be exceedingly easy to match and beat it out of the author himself — you must go to the maddest of the seventeenth-century metaphysicals — say to Edward Benlowes himself. But this is nothing : it is at worst an obvious playful exaggeration, very like some things of Dickens's own transposed into another key. But take this opening of the fifteenth chapter of Diana of the Crossways : — " The Gods of this world's contests, against whom our poor stripped individual is...
Página 3 - The opinion of the present writer — the result, at least, of many years' reading and thought — is that it is a result of the marriage of the older East and the newer (nonclassical) West through the agency of the spread of Christianity and the growth and diffusion of the " Saint's Life." The beginnings of Hagiology itself are very uncertain : but what is certain is that they are very early: and that as the amalgamation or leavening of the Roman world with barbarian material proceeded, the spread...
Página 186 - Stripped of these tiresome lendings (which, as has been frequently pointed out, were a mania with the eighteenth century and naturally grew to such intricacy as this), the central story, though not exactly new, is impressive: and it is told and worked out in manner more impressive, because practically novel, save for, perhaps, a little suggestion from Vathek. Melmoth has bartered his soul with the devil for something like immortality and other privileges, including the unusual one of escaping doom...
Página 27 - one of the great books of the world," he pays most honor in this respect. Malory was an artist not a mere compiler; he had "the sense of grasp, the power to put his finger, and to keep it, on the central pulse and nerve of the story. The Arthurian legend is the greatest of mediaeval creations.
Página 190 - Interesting as each of these two great novelists is individually, the interest of the pair, from our present historical point of view, is almost greater; and the way in which they complete each other is hardly short of uncanny. Before their time, despite the great examples of prose fiction produced by Bunyan, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne, and the remarkable determination towards the life of ordinary society given, or instanced, by Miss Burney; despite the immense novelproduction...
Página 174 - Rosa," as Sarah Wilkinson, or as Henrietta MosseRouviere. The first three would make a very good group for a twenty-page causerie. Charlotte Smith, who was tolerably expert in verse as well as prose; who anticipated, and perhaps taught, Scott in the double use of the name " Waverley "; and whose Old Manor House (1793) is a solid but not heavy work of its kind — is something of a person in herself, but less of a figure in history, because she neither innovates nor does old things consummately. Harriet...
Página 247 - Both, but especially Yeast, are full of admirable descriptive writing, not entirely without indebtedness to Mr. Ruskin, but very often independently carried out, and always worthy of a " place on the line " in any gallery. There is much accurate and real dialogue, not a little firm character-drawing. Above all, both are full of blood — of things lived and seen, not vamped up from reading or day-dreaming — and yet full of dreams, day and other, and full of literature. Perhaps " the malt was a...

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