The Letters of Junius, Volumen2

Portada
J. Wheble, 1772
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 50 - Shall the Lords be called upon to determine the rights and privileges of the Commons ? They cannot do it, without a flagrant breach of the constitution.
Página 30 - ... secure the happiness of his subjects. In these circumstances, it may be matter of curious SPECULATION to consider if an honest man were permitted to approach a king, in what terms he would address himself to his sovereign.
Página 55 - The first foundation of friendship is not the power of conferring benefits, but the equality with which they are received, and may be returned.
Página 34 - Scotland are not in actual rebellion, they are undoubtedly entitled to protection: nor do I mean to condemn the policy of giving some encouragement to the novelty of their affections for the house of Hanover.
Página 179 - That the writ of habeas corpus may not be denied, but ought to be granted to every man that is committed or detained in prison, or otherwise restrained, though it be by the command of the king, the privy council, or any other, he praying the same.
Página 114 - Our language has no term of reproach, the mind has no idea of detestation, which has not already been happily applied to you, and exhausted. — Ample justice has been done by abler pens than mine to the separate merits of your life and character. Let it be my humble office to collect the scattered sweets, till their united virtue tortures the sense.
Página 183 - While I remember how much is due to his sacred character, I cannot, with any decent appearance of propriety, call you the meanest and the basest fellow in the kingdom. I protest, my Lord, I do not think you so.
Página 118 - ... invariably be determined, you have fondly introduced your own unsettled notions of equity and substantial justice. Decisions given upon such principles do not alarm the public so much as they ought, because the consequence . and tendency of each particular instance is not observed or regarded. In the mean time, the practice gains ground ; the Court of King's Bench becomes a court of equity ; and the judge, instead of consulting strictly the law of the land, refers only to the wisdom of the court,...
Página 37 - There is a holy mistaken zeal in politics as well as religion. By persuading others we convince ourselves. The passions are engaged, and create a maternal affection in the mind, which forces us to love the cause for which we suffer.
Página 200 - twill be a heap ; this is not true Alone in money, but in manners too. Yet we must more than move still, or go on ; We must accomplish ; 'tis the last key-stone That makes the arch ; the rest that there were put Are nothing till that comes to bind and shut.

Información bibliográfica