Man and the Glacial Period

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D. Appleton, 1892 - 385 páginas
 

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Página 19 - As we approached the land under all studding sails, we perceived a low white line extending from its eastern extreme point as far as the eye could discern to the eastward. It presented an extraordinary appearance, gradually increasing in height as we got nearer to it, and proving at length to be a perpendicular cliff of ice between 150 and 200 feet above the level of the sea, perfectly flat and level at the top, and without any fissures or promontories on its even seaward face...
Página 212 - The gravel in which they [Dr. Abbott's implements] are found is glacial gravel deposited upon the banks of the Delaware when, during the last stages of the Glacial period, the river was swollen with vast floods of water from the melting ice. Man was on this continent at that period when the climate and ice of Greenland extended to the mouth of New York Harbor.
Página 19 - ... feet above the level of the sea, perfectly flat and level at the top, and without any fissures or promontories on its even seaward face What was beyond it we could not imagine ; for, being much higher than our mast-head, we could not see anything except the summit of a lofty range of mountains extending to the southward as far as the 79th degree of latitude.
Página 32 - ... observations. The total area of Greenland can not be less than 500,000 square miles — equal in extent to the portion of the United States east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio. It is now pretty evident that the whole of this area, except a narrow border about the southern end, is covered by one continuous sheet of moving ice, pressing outward on every side toward the open water of the surrounding seas. For a long time it was the belief of many that a large region in the interior of...
Página 18 - ... two magnificent ranges of mountains, whose lofty peaks, perfectly covered with eternal snow, rose to elevations varying from seven to ten thousand feet above the level of the ocean. The glaciers that filled their intervening valleys, and which descended from near the mountain summits, projected in many places several miles into the sea, and terminated in lofty perpendicular cliffs. In a few places the rocks broke through their icy covering, by which alone we could be assured that land formed...

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