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he was obliged to keep up a “contince England controlled the salt-manufact- je commerce, and maintained a resident * capital. The gaekwar was charged with an tempt to poison the resident; whereupon the vicey deposed him, and put him in confinement, no

Y seemed to know where. The widow of his .redecessor had meanwhile adopted a little boy, and vete dhe viceroy made him gaekwar, appointing Sir Ma

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“All eyes were dazzled when the little boy, whom the Government of India had installed as the Gaekwar of Baroda, stood at the threshold of the door-a crystallized rainbow. He is a small, delicately-framed lad for his twelve years and more, with a bright, pleasant face. He was weighted, head, neck, chest, arms, fingers, ankles, with such a sight and wonder of vast diamonds, emeralds, rubies, and pearls, as would be worth the loot of .many a rich town. It is useless to give the estimate I heard of their value, and the little gentleman had more at home. He was met at the edge of the carpet, and strode with much solemnity to his seat, side by side with the prince. Sir Madhava Rao, Sir R. Meade, and a noble train of chiefs, came with him. The visit of the gaekwar lasted a minute or two longer than usual, for the prince asked several questions, and conversed with Sir Madhava Rao and Sir R. Meade. The former, the present regent, is one of the men who rise to the surface in Hindostan by sheer strength of talent, industry, and intelligence. He is a Mahratta Brahman, forty-seven years of age, and was educated in the High-School of the Madras University, where he was at one time acting Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. He subsequently filled several posts in the civil service, and was then appointed tutor and companion to the Prince of Travancore, and was made prime-minister of that state in 1858. 'In this capacity he acted for fourteen years, with such benefit to British native rule that he was made Knight of the Star of India, and was offered a seat in

the Legislative Council, which he declined. When the THE PRINCE IN SHOOTING-COSTUME.

viceroy deposed Mulhar Rao, and it became essential to place Baroda in the hands of a native statesman, the

British authorities applied to Sir Madhava Rao, who acFrere, although the prince only advanced half-way cepted the grave responsibility." down the carpet to meet him.

These three receptions had consumed an hour, Mr. Russell goes on to speak in high terms of when the sound of a salute of twenty-one guns an- the administrative ability displayed by this native nounced that some one of royal dignity was at hand. of India. He has not begun by sweeping away It was no other than the Maharaja Syajce Rao, the all old institutions and customs, tearing up tradition Gaekwar of Baroda, nominally an independent by the roots, and leaving a bleeding and irritating state, which the British Government has quite re- surface to receive the application of new ideas ; but cently undertaken to “protect” in a fashion of its he has worked on the old basis and repaired the anown. Baroda is what is left of what was the mighty cient structure.” Men of similar power and character state of Guzerat in the days of Warren Hastings. are clearly not very uncommon among the natives; How it was pared down by that able and unscrupu- and we believe that in this fact lies the essential lous statesman has been told by Macaulay. Not peril which menaces British rule in India. It must long before the visit of the Prince of Wales, Baroda, be borne in mind that in all India there are not at with a territory about as large as the State of Con- this day more than one hundred thousand Euronecticut, had a busy population of considerably more peans; and we do not think it possible that the two than two millions. The gaekwar was not a subject hundred millions or more of natives can very long, of the British Empire, had the right of coining his despite the loudest professions of loyalty to the empress, be kept in subjection by so small a force alien was apparently corded securely over his head, and in race and character, in religion and culture. In the boy was jammed into the basket, which he our view the British domination in India rests upon seemed to fill completely. All at once sack and a thin shell overlying a bottomless quicksand ; and cloth were jerked out from the basket, whereat the this shell is liable at any moment to give way. juggler seemed to be in a towering rage. He jumped

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We pass over the long list of princes, great and upon the top of the basket, crushed in the lid, and small, who had audience one by one on this day, drove a stick through and through the wicker-work. closing with “ a very interesting group of picturesque He then removed the lid, and the basket was empty. personages, mostly in bare feet and fine turbans,” But, perched among the branches of a tree close by, who were admitted in a batch and dismissed, leaving there was seen the boy, or one just like him. The the prince and his suite in a very much bored condi- cloth which had been placed over the mango-seed tion. Quite as wearisome were the balls and festivi- was then lifted, and under it was a tiny tree covties which the poor prince, who was longing for a ered with fresh fruit. All this was done by ordilittle quiet shooting, was forced to grace with his nary strolling performers, and without any of the presence. “It was not given to every one," says complicated apparatus used by our own jugglers. Mr. Russell, “to have strength for these festivities. How they managed to cheat the eyes of the spectaThere were always absentees, or some who 'popped tors is a mystery. in and hopped out again.' Perhaps the Duke of After ten days or so at Bombay, the prince decided

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Sutherland and Sir Bartle were among the latter, to visit the little gaekwar at Baroda, his capital, some and certainly Canon Duckworth was of the former ; two hundred and fifty miles northward. Perhaps but the prince was never known to disappoint expec- the main inducement was that he might there find a tations or to throw a chill over such gatherings by little shooting; but, besides this, there was an opporretiring early.” No wonder that the prince tried to tunity of seeing a genuine native court, still flourishamuse himself now and then by searching for less ing within less than a day's journey by rail from one formal sights, such as the performances of the street of the capitals of British India. At all events, he jugglers, when he could do so without being recog- met with a purely Oriental reception in a city of one nized by the crowds. On one of these occasions the hundred thousand inhabitants which few Europeans performers were "a withered, vivacious juggler, and have ever reached. At the station was the little a ragged, snake-charming confederate-chatty old gaekwar and his regent, Sir Madhava Rao, waiting fellows, whose skin hung on their bones as if it were to receive him, and to escort him to the British resicracked brown paper." A mango-seed had been dency hard by the native city. For the prince's ridplaced in the ground in plain sight of all, and cov- ing was an elephant of extraordinary size, bearing a ered with a dirty cloth. Then a shallow basket howdah, or canopied seat of silver gilt—some said three feet long and eighteen inches high was placed of gold—with cushions of velvet and cloth of gold, on the bare ground. A lad of twelve was bound fastened over an embroidered cloth which completely hand and foot with strong twine ; a sack of stout covered the form of the great beast. The cost of netting was slipped over his head, and the old fellow the trappings was said to have been four hundred pressed him down on his haunches, and the sack thousand rupees. The head of the elephant was cious stones. His state contains a population of own money, and maintained an army of some eigheleven hundred and sixty-eight thousand, and has a teen thousand men, costing four million rupees a revenue of four million rupees, of which only two year. But there were treaties with England, in virhundred thousand go as tribute to the British Gov- tue of which he was obliged to keep up a “continernment.

gent,” while England controlled the salt-manufact. Next came Maharo Shree Pragmulgee Rao, of ures and the commerce, and maintained a resident Cutch, an infirm old seventeen-gun man, whose state in the capital. The gaekwar was charged with an contains six thousand five hundred square miles. attempt to poison the resident; whereupon the vice“The population is under half a million, and the roy deposed him, and put him in confinement, norevenue but one million five hundred thousand ru- body seemed to know where. The widow of his pees. It was harshly dealt with by our rulers in predecessor had meanwhile adopted a little boy, and times past,” says Mr. Russell ; " but they did some the viceroy made him gaekwar, appointing Sir Magood, too, and now they are doing justice.” He dhava Rao, a Brahman of whom more anon, as actual went away quite satisfied at having seen Sir Bartle ruler of Baroda. Mr. Russell thus describes the re

ception of this child :

“ All eyes were dazzled when the little boy, whom the Government of India had installed as the Gaekwar of Baroda, stood at the threshold of the door-a crystallized rainbow. He is a small, delicately-framed lad for his twelve years and more, with a bright, pleasant face. He was weighted, head, neck, chest, arms, fingers, ankles, with such a sight and wonder of vast diamonds, emeralds, rubies, and pearls, as would be worth the loot of many a rich town. It is useless to give the estimate I heard of their value, and the little gentleman had more at home. He was met at the edge of the carpet, and strode with much solemnity to his seat, side by side with the prince. Sir Madhava Rao, Sir R. Meade, and a noble train of chiefs, came with him. The visit of the gaekwar lasted a minute or two longer than usual, for the prince asked several questions, and conversed with Sir Madhava Rao and Sir R. Meade. The former, the present regent, is one of the men who rise to the surface in Hindostan by sheer strength of talent, industry, and intelligence. He is a Mahratta Brahman, forty-seven years of age, and was educated in the High-School of the Madras University, where he was at one time acting Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. He subsequently filled several posts in the civil service, and was then appointed tutor and companion to the Prince of Travancore, and was made prime-minister of that state in 1858. 'In this capacity he acted for fourteen years, with such benefit to British native rule that he was made Knight of the Star of India, and was offered a seat in

the Legislative Council, which he declined. When the THE PRINCE IN SHOOTING-COSTUME.

viceroy deposed Mulhar Rao, and it became essential to

place Baroda in the hands of a native statesman, the Frere, although the prince only advanced half-way British authorities applied to Sir Madhava Rao, who ac

cepted the grave responsibility." down the carpet to meet him.

These three receptions had consumed an hour, Mr. Russell goes on to speak in high terms of when the sound of a salute of twenty-one guns an- the administrative ability displayed by this native nounced that some one of royal dignity was at hand. of India. “He has not begun by sweeping away It was no other than the Maharaja Syajce Rao, the all old institutions and customs, tearing up tradition Gaekwar of Baroda, nominally an independent by the roots, and leaving a bleeding and irritating state, which the British Government has quite re- surface to receive the application of new ideas; but cently undertaken to “protect” in a fashion of its he has worked on the old basis and repaired the an

Baroda is what is left of what was the mighty cient structure." Men of similar power and character state of Guzerat in the days of Warren Hastings. are clearly not very uncommon among the natives; How it was pared down by that able and unscrupu- and we believe that in this fact lies the essential lous statesman has been told by Macaulay. Not peril which menaces British rule in India. It must long before the visit of the Prince of Wales, Baroda, be borne in mind that in all India there are not at with a territory about as large as the State of Con- this day more than one hundred thousand Euronecticut, had a busy population of considerably more peans; and we do not think it possible that the two than two millions. The gaekwar was not a subject hundred millions or more of natives can very long, of the British Empire, had the right of coining his despite the loudest professions of loyalty to the em

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own,

press, be kept in subjection by so small a force alien was apparently corded securely over his head, and in race and character, in religion and culture. In the boy was jammed into the basket, which he our view the British domination in India rests upon seemed to fill completely. All at once sack and a thin shell overlying a bottomless quicksand ; and cloth were jerked out from the basket, whereat the this shell is liable at any moment to give way. juggler seemed to be in a towering rage. He jumped

We pass over the long list of princes, great and upon the top of the basket, crushed in the lid, and small, who had audience one by one on this day, drove a stick through and through the wicker-work. closing with “a very interesting group of picturesque He then removed the lid, and the basket was empty. personages, mostly in bare feet and fine turbans,” But, perched among the branches of a tree close by, who were admitted in a batch and dismissed, leaving there was seen the boy, or one just like him. The the prince and his suite in a very much bored condi- cloth which had been placed over the mango-seed tion. Quite as wearisome were the balls and festivi- was then lifted, and under it was a tiny tree covties which the poor prince, who was longing for a ered with fresh fruit. All this was done by ordi. little quiet shooting, was forced to grace with his nary strolling performers, and without any of the presence. “It was not given to every one,” says complicated apparatus used by our o jugglers. Mr. Russell, “to have strength for these festivities. How they managed to cheat the eyes of the spectaThere were always absentees, or some who 'popped tors is a mystery. in and hopped out again.' Perhaps the Duke of After ten days or so at Bombay, the prince decided

[graphic][merged small]

Sutherland and Sir Bartle were among the latter, to visit the little gaekwar at Baroda, his capital, some and certainly Canon Duckworth was of the former; two hundred and fifty miles northward. Perhaps but the prince was never known to disappoint expec- the main inducement was that he might there find a tations or to throw a chill over such gatherings by little shooting; but, besides this, there was an opporretiring early.” No wonder that the prince tried to tunity of seeing a genuine native court, still flourishamuse himself now and then by searching for less ing within less than a day's journey by rail from one formal sights, such as the performances of the street of the capitals of British India. At all events, he jugglers, when he could do so without being recog- met with a purely Oriental reception in a city of one nized by the crowds. On one of these occasions the hundred thousand inhabitants which few Europeans performers were “a withered, vivacious juggler, and have ever reached. At the station was the little a ragged, snake-charming confederate-chatty old gaekwar and his regent, Sir Madhava Rao, waiting fellows, whose skin hung on their bones as if it were to receive him, and to escort him to the British resicracked brown paper." A mango-seed had been dency hard by the native city. For the prince's ridplaced in the ground in plain sight of all, and cov- ing was an elephant of extraordinary size, bearing a ered with a dirty cloth. Then a shallow basket howdah, or canopied seat of silver gilt-some said three feet long and eighteen inches high was placed of gold—with cushions of velvet and cloth of gold, on the bare ground. A lad of twelve was bound fastened over an embroidered cloth which completely hand and foot with strong twine ; a sack of stout covered the form of the great beast. The cost of netting was slipped over his head, and the old fellow the trappings was said to have been four hundred pressed him down on his haunches, and the sack thousand rupees. The head of the elephant was painted a bright saffron-color, the ears of a light till his jaw touched the sand, made a thrust with his green, and the proboscis gayly ornamented with snout at his friend, which was returned at once, and various fanciful devices. His tusks had been cut then, to the infinite delight of the spectators, there off to the length of three or four feet, and larger was a quick succession of blows, until the one who ones fastened by gold bands to the stumps. Upon had begun the difficulty turned tail and lumbered his painted legs were thick coils of gold. A second off toward the gateway, amid the reproaches of his elephant, painted in slate-color and red, with a backers, who managed to goad him back to where his howdah of burnished silver, and silver leglets and friend was standing stupidly, as if wondering what tusklets, was provided for the Duke of Sutherland; the pother was all about ; but a treacherous dig in and a long file of others, each painted in a differ- the side convinced him that mischief was meant, ent manner, were ready for other attendants of the and he went for his assailant. For a few minutes it prince. Provided with a military escort, the caval- looked very much like a fight; but the original agcade moved on. Every inch of the way was bor- gressor got more than he had bargained for, and dered by a light trellis-work of bamboos and palm- made off again, to the evident relief of the other, leaves, hung with lamps, and festooned with green who showed no inclination to follow up his advan. leaves and bright flowers, with grand arches and tage. A couple of buffaloes next made their bows, groups of banners at intervals. “The people seemed and went briskly to work. But they were not evenvery comfortable, and there was no sign of the ly matched. At the first round the smaller one was wretchedness we are so fond of attributing to native tumbled clear over, and got a bad fall. He was on rule.”

his feet again in a moment, and did his best to score The prince was treated to an entertainment in a point, but came to grief. His seconds threw up the the arena for wild-beast combats, which was, after sponge, and he left the field in a somewhat demoralall, a very commonplace affair. First came a bout ized condition. The exhibition was closed by a of what we have learned to style “Greco-Roman kind of free fight between a number of rams. These wrestling." The athletes “were masses of brown light-weights won all the glories of the day.

“ There muscle, a little abdominous perhaps, but still of was nothing of the timidity of the sheep in their enormous power. At first there were two, then four, engagements,” says the chronicler; "the fury of then six animated Laocoons, striving, writhing, and their charges, the tremendous cracks with which rolling about in the dust, in such knotted coils of their heads met together, were worthy of all praise ; arms and legs as baffled discrimination. They were and I would certainly sooner see them than a couple matched so well that only once did the applause of of prize-fighters at home.” the spectators announce a victory or a defeat-the Next day the prince and his suite went out for a great feat of strength by which one of the wrestlers, day's sport in the gaekwar's preserves a few miles uprooting his antagonist from the ground, prizes him distant. There were half a dozen cheetahs, or hunt over his knee, and throws him over so that both ing-leopards, “standing upright on carts drawn by shoulders touch the ground.” Two elephants, their oxen, their eyes hooded, lashing their lank sides tusks sawed short, were brought forward. They met with their tails, hissing and purring by turns, like pacifically in the centre of the arena ; but the at- monster tabbies." It is gratifying to learn that tendants, by yells and prods, somehow got it into the “the prince inspected the cheetahs with interest: one heads of the creatures that, at least in appearance, was taken from the cart for closer inspection, at they must be enemies. But Mr. Russell thought which it hissed savagely.” There were also “uglythat “these sagacious creatures were only making looking dogs, half greyhound, half deerhound, in believe. Certainly there was some hard hitting and leashes, and eight falconers with splendid peregrines tremendous head collisions ; tusks. rattled, proboscis and inferior, short-winged falcons on their wrists.” met proboscis in intricate convolutions, and the vast Mounted on ox-carts, the hunters set out in search hulls shook under the strain of combat.” But just of game. They had been told that the deer were acwhen they had got their trunks tied up in a tight customed to see these vehicles, and would not take knot, squibs were fired off under their bellies, where alarm. But, though bucks enough were soon in upon they let go their hold, and went to their cor- sight, they evidently suspected mischief, and made

The first round was over. In the second off. “ Perhaps it was owing to the novel costume round one of the combatants got the choice of posic of the hunters-helmets and London shooting-clothes tion, and butted his opponent on quarter and stern -or the unusual length of the procession, which set till he was brought up against the wall. Rockets them on the alert.” Finally, after no little maneuand squibs were brought into play to separate the vring, they got within fifty yards of a herd, and a combatants, who were then dragged from the ring, cheetah was let slip. He singled out a buck, which neither having received any severe punishment. A made off with amazing bounds, soon showing that he couple of rhinoceroses were next brought in, grunt- had the heels of his pursuer, who gave up the chase ing like pigs as they toddled up toward each other. after a dash of some five hundred yards, which is said “Two merchants could not be more amiable at their to be the longest run they ever make. In time they first introduction on 'Change. They came up nose to got near another herd. A couple of bucks were too nose as if to exchange civilities;” but the attendants busy fighting to notice what was going on, and one began to excite ill-feelings by alternately poking and of them was pulled down by a cheetah, who got the patting them, until one of them, lowering his head | blood as his reward. Soon another herd was ap

ners.

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