The Fouling and Corrosion of Iron Ships: Their Causes and Means of Prevention, with the Mode of Application to the Existing Iron-clads

Portada
London Drawing Association, 1867 - 212 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inadecuado

Obra exemplar

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 97 - ... of a minute than any man would willingly allow to pass through his body at once. The chemical action of a grain of water upon four grains of zinc can evolve electricity equal in quantity to that of a powerful thunderstorm!
Página 134 - Esq., FRS Royal Mint, 26th April, 1838. Gentlemen, — I have examined the several articles sent to me by your order under the name of galvanized iron, and represented as manufactured of iron in various combinations with zinc. In this way an arrangement susceptible of electric excitation is obtained, in which, consistently with the laws of electro-chemical action, a preservative power is conferred by the zinc upon the other metal ; for in all cases in which two different metals are in contact, a...
Página 74 - ... where there are no Docks of sufficient size, it is necessary < « - . to send them home whenever their bottoms require to be either cleaned or repaired. During their absence from their stations, the cost of wages, victuals, coals, and of wear and tear, is a dead loss, and this loss would be of constant recurrence in the case of iron ships, as it is necessary to dock them, for the mere purpose of cleaning their bottoms, at least four or five times in the course of the ordinary duration of a commission.
Página 97 - Hence, as an approximation, and judging from magnetic force only at present (376.), it would appear that two wires, one of platina and one of zinc, each one eighteenth of an inch in diameter, placed five sixteenths of an inch apart and immersed to the depth of five eighths of an inch in acid, consisting of one drop...
Página 97 - Fahr., and connected at the other extremities by a copper wire eighteen feet long and one eighteenth of an inch in thickness, yielded as much electricity in little more than three seconds of time as a Leyden battery charged by thirty turns of a very large and powerful plate electric machine in full action.
Página 36 - ... weighed after it had probably remained more than 1300 years under water; it was doubly planked with pine and cypress, coated with pitch, upon which there was a covering of linen, and, over all, a sheathing of lead fastened, with nails of brass or copper ; the timber was in a perfectly sound state. In the reign of Henry VIII. large vessels had a coating of loose animal hair attached with pitch, over which a sheathing board of about an inch in thickness was fastened " to keep the hair in its place.
Página 34 - Ship-building is yet in its infancy, and that there are no well-understood general rules for building Iron Ships, the Committee have not deemed it desirable to frame a scheme compelling the adoption of a particular form or mode of construction, but that certain general requirements should be put forward, having for their basis thickness of plates and substance of frame, showing a minimum in each particular to entitle Ships to the Character A for a period of years, subject, however, to certain periodical...
Página 34 - Considering that iron shipbuilding is yet in its infancy, and that there are no well-understood general rules for building iron ships, the committee have not deemed it desirable to frame a scheme compelling the adoption of a particular form or mode of construction, but that certain general requirements should be put forward having for their basis...
Página 10 - ... powers for supremacy on the ocean will be determined chiefly by iron-clad or armored ships. Ourturreted vessels or monitors will be powerful and effective for harbor and coast defence, but in conflict with any European power our countrymen will hardly be content with merely defensive warfare. Armored vessels for ocean cruising must necessarily be of large size, which cannot, with the requisite strength, be secured in wooden structures. If attempted, the immense masses of timber must rapidly decay,...

Información bibliográfica