British Government and the Constitution: Text and Materials

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Cambridge University Press, 2007 M06 28
The first five editions of this well established book were written by Colin Turpin. This new edition has been prepared jointly by Colin Turpin and Adam Tomkins. This edition sees a major restructuring of the material, as well as a complete updating. New developments such as the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 and recent case law concerning the sovereignty of Parliament, the Human Rights Act, counter-terrorism and protests against the Iraq War, among other matters, are extracted and analysed. While it includes extensive material and commentary on contemporary constitutional reform, Turpin and Tomkins is a book that covers the historical traditions and the continuity of the British constitution as well as the current tide of change. All the chapters contain detailed suggestions for further reading. Designed principally for law students the book includes substantial extracts from parliamentary and other political sources, as well as from legislation and case law. As such it is essential reading also for politics and government students. Much of the material has been reworked and with its fresh design the book provides a detailed yet accessible account of the British constitution at a fascinating moment in its ongoing development.

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Contenido

The European Union
278
supremacy direct and indirect
305
Crown and government
345
g The civil service
416
Executive power
429
The House of Lords
642
judicial review and liability
654
Liability of public authorities
710

9
54
lawmaking
112
Constitutional sources
138
Conventions
156
Devolution and the structure of the United Kingdom
180
The countries of the United Kingdom
192
d Northern Ireland
228
c Centrallocal government relations
259
Tribunals
716
Liberty and the Constitution
727
Liberty and the Human Rights Act 1998
739
Freedom of expression
772
Freedom of assembly
796
Index
819
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Página 742 - Right to respect for private and family life 1 Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence. 2 There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for...
Página 283 - In areas which do not fall within its exclusive competence, the community shall take action, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity, only if and in so far as the objectives of the proposed action cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States and can therefore, by reason of the scale or effects of the proposed action, be better achieved by the community.
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Página 142 - To no one will we sell, to no one will we refuse or delay, right or justice.
Página 742 - No one shall be held guilty of any criminal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a criminal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed.
Página 109 - In the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.

Acerca del autor (2007)

Colin Turpin is a Fellow of Clare College and Emeritus Reader in Public Law at the University of Cambridge.

Adam Tomkins is the John Millar Professor of Public Law at the University of Glasgow. His previous books include Public Law (2003), Our Republican Constitution (2005) and European Union Law: Text and Materials (2006).

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