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" I envy not in any moods The captive void of noble rage, The linnet born within the cage, That never knew the summer woods : I envy not the beast that takes His license in the field of time... "
The Poetical Works of Alfred Tennyson - Página 80
por Alfred Tennyson Baron Tennyson - 1875
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The Ladies' Cabinet of Fashion, Music & Romance

1867
...apply to the pleasant memories I should be sorry to have vanished altogether from my remembrance : ' I hold it true, whate'er befall ; I feel it when I sorrow most : Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all.' " One first and last peep at Mr. John Moncton, the hero par excellence,...
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The General Baptist repository, and Missionary observer [afterw.] The ...

1872
...memory, so all unutterably dear to her : by these, without any words, she often seemed to say — • " I hold it true, whate'er befall ; I feel it when I sorrow most ; 'Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all." You heard it when she sang, still not those words. She had a pleasant...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volumen21

1850
...breathes such sweetness and sacredness. The key-note of the whole is struck at the beginning : — " I hold it true, whate'er befall ; I feel it when I sorrow most ; "fis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all."* And the same sentiment seeks...
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Fanny Lee's testimony

Beulah Kezia Hanson - 1845
...-wear on, I hunger more To see your face again before I die. ALEXANDEB SMITH. ~i hold it true, whatc'cr befall, I feel it when I sorrow most ; 'Tis better to have loved and lost, Than never to have loved at all. TENNYSON. GAINIpassoveranintervaloffouryears. During this period no...
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Sartain's Union Magazine of Literature and Art, Volumen7

John Seely Hart - 1850
...license, iu the field of time, Unfettered by the sense of crime, To whom a conscience never wake*; Nor, what may count itself as blest, • The heart...it true, whate'er befall; I feel it, when I sorrow rao«t; 'Tis bfttfr to hin-f, brred and /ojl, Than never to hare tared at all. JOSEPH AND nis BRKTHIU.N.—...
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Notes and Queries, Volumen43

1871
...tenderness and elegance few prose men of his day could have rivalled. Tennyson's words are these : — " I hold it true, whate'er befall, I feel it when I sorrow moat; "Пз better to have loved and lost, Than never to have loved at all.'" In Mtmoriam, xxvii. Congreve's...
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The Palladium: a monthly journal

1850
...whom a conscience never wakes ; Sorrow is gradually shown to be the teacher of a pure, or rather the H Nor, what may count itself as blest, The heart that...I sorrow most ; 'Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to bave loved at all. only pure philosophy. Secular knowledge is humbled before loving faith,...
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In Memoriam

Alfred Tennyson Baron Tennyson - 1850 - 210 páginas
...license in the field of time, Unfetter'd by the sense of crime, To whom a conscience never wakes ; Nor, what may count itself as blest, The heart that...I sorrow most ; 'Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all. 44 XXVIII. THE time draws near the birth of Christ : The moon is hid...
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Sartain's Union Magazine of Literature and Art, Volumen7

John Seely Hart - 1850
...Unfettered by the sense of crime, To whom a conscience never wakes; Nor, what may count itself ns blost, The heart that never plighted troth, But stagnates...true, whate'er befall; I feel it, when I sorrow most; . Ti- b-lirr to Aa« loetd and roz¡, Than never to have lored at all. JOSEPH лгго HIS BumiosN.—...
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In Memoriam

Alfred Tennyson Baron Tennyson - 1850 - 216 páginas
...license in the field of time, Unfettered by the sense of crime, To whom a conscience never wakes ; Nor, what may count itself as blest, The heart that...in the weeds of sloth, Nor any want-begotten rest. II hold it true, whate'er befall ; I feel it, when I sorrow most ; 'T is better to have loved and lost...
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