The Poetics of Aristotle: Its Meaning and Influence, Volumen6

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Marshall Jones Company, 1923 - 157 páginas
 

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Página 135 - ... to be an interpreter and relater of the best and sagest things among mine own citizens throughout this island in the mother dialect, that what the greatest and choicest wits of Athens, Rome, or modern Italy, and those Hebrews of old did for their country, I, in my proportion, with this over and above, of being a christian, might do for mine...
Página 135 - ... that sublime art, which, in Aristotle's Poetics, in Horace, and the Italian commentaries of Castelvetro, Tasso, Mazzoni, and others, teaches what the laws are of a true epic poem, what of a dramatic, what of a lyric, what decorum is, which is the grand masterpiece to observe.
Página 137 - This is mentioned to vindicate tragedy from the small esteem, or rather infamy, which in the account of many it undergoes at this day with other common interludes...
Página 143 - Aristotle, I have been told, has said, that Poetry is the most philosophic of all writing: it is so : its object is truth, not individual and local, but general, and operative...
Página 92 - Trage'die is to seyn a certeyn storie, As olde bookes maken us memorie, Of hym that stood in greet prosperitee, And is y-fallen out of heigh degree Into myserie, and endeth wrecchedly...
Página 136 - Tragedy, as it was antiently compos'd, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other Poems : therefore said by Aristotle to be of power by raising pity and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and such like passions, that is to temper and reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight, stirr'd up by reading or seeing those passions well imitated.
Página 67 - Come now, therefore, and let us slay him, and cast him into some pit, and we will say some evil beast hath devoured him, and we shall see what will become of his dreams.
Página 136 - Nor is nature wanting in her own effects to make good his assertion ; for so in physic, things of melancholic hue and quality are used against melancholy, sour against sour, salt to remove salt humours.
Página 138 - The circumscription of time wherein the whole drama begins and ends, is according to ancient rule, and best example, within the space of twenty-four hours.
Página 135 - Job a brief model : or whether the rules of Aristotle herein are strictly to be kept, or nature to be followed, which in them that know art, and use judgment, is no transgression, but an enriching of art...

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