On the Source of Muscular Power: Arguments and Conclusions Drawn from Observations Upon the Human Subject, Under Conditions of Rest and of Muscular Exercise

Portada
D. Appleton, 1878 - 103 páginas
Austin Flint, Jr., the fifth in line of medical ancestry, was an eminent physiologist who made studies of nitrogen excretion and cholesterin. -- H.W. Orr.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 97 - ... develops the capacity for work ; but food is not directly converted into force in the living body nor is it a source of muscular power, except that it maintains the muscular system in a proper condition for work.
Página 34 - Boiled and roasted flesh is converted at once into blood ; while the uric acid and urea are derived from the metamorphosed tissues. The quantity of these products increases with the rapidity of transformation in a given time, but bears no proportion to the amount of food taken in the same period. In a starving man, who is any way compelled to undergo severe and continued exertion, more urea is secreted than in the most highly fed individual, if in a state of rest.
Página 37 - ... more measurable work than the equivalent of the amount of heat which, taken at a most absurdly high figure, could be calculated to result from the burning of the albumen.' They further go on to state that, so far from the oxidation of albuminous substances being the only source of muscular power, ' the substances by the burning of which force is generated in the muscles are not the albuminous constituents of those tissues, but non-nitrogenous substances, either fats or hydrates of carbon,' and...
Página 97 - American pedestrian, which seemed to show that, in his case at least, the excretion of nitrogen is very distinctly increased, both during and after severe muscular work. He accordingly comes to the conclusion that "the exercise of muscular power immediately involves the. destruction of a certain amount of muscular substance, of which the nitrogen excreted is a measure.
Página 7 - By AUSTIN FLINT, Jr., MD, Professor of Physiology in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, etc., etc. i vol., 8vo, 103 pp. Cloth, $1.00. " There are few questions relating to Philosophy of greater interest and importance than the one which is the subject of this essay. I have attempted to present an accurate statement of my own observations and what seem to me to be the logical conclusions to be drawn from them, as well as from experiments made by others upon the human subject under conditions...

Información bibliográfica