TH ELIFE OF HORACE GREELEY, EDITOR OF THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE

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Página 133 - Whereas it is necessary for the support of government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures, that duties be laid on goods, wares, and merchandises imported: Be it enacted, etc.
Página viii - I have great faith in hard work. The material world does much for the mind by its beauty and order ; but it does more for our minds by the pains it inflicts — by its obstinate resistance, which nothing but patient toil can overcome — by its vast forces, which nothing but unremitting skill and effort can turn to our use— by its perils, which demand continual vigilance — and by its tendencies to decay. I believe that difficulties are more important to the human mind than what we call assistances....
Página 115 - Every individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of the society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage naturally, or rather necessarily leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.
Página 248 - If the term of seven years were to be selected of the greatest prosperity which this people have enjoyed since the establishment of their present constitution, it would be exactly that period of seven years which immediately followed the passage of the tariff of 1824.
Página 21 - In short, sir, we have been too long subject to the policy of British merchants. It is time that we should become a little more Americanized; and instead of feeding the paupers and laborers of England feed our own, or else in a short time by continuing our present policy we shall all be rendered paupers ourselves.
Página 110 - How entirely unconnected with them shall we be, and what troubles may we not apprehend, if the Spaniards on their right and Great Britain...
Página vi - an endless significance lies in Work;" a man perfects himself by working. Foul jungles are cleared away, fair seedfields rise instead, and stately cities ; and withal the man himself first ceases to be a jungle and foul unwholesome desert thereby. Consider, how, even in the meanest sorts of...
Página 100 - In selecting the branches more especially entitled to the public patronage, a preference is obviously claimed by such as will relieve the United States from a dependence on foreign supplies, ever subject to casual failures for articles necessary for the public defence, or connected with the primary wants of individuals.
Página viii - Man owes his growth, his energy, chiefly to that striving of the will, that conflict with difficulty, which we call Effort. Easy, pleasant work does not make robust minds, does not give men a consciousness of their powers, does not train them to endurance, to perseverance, to steady force of will, that force without which all other acquisitions avail nothing.
Página 116 - ... of production which could not stand against unrestrained foreign competition would be discouraged, yet, as no importation could be continued for any length of time without a corresponding exportation, direct or indirect, there would be an encouragement, for the purpose of that exportation, of some other production to which our situation might be better suited, thus affording at least an equal, and probably a greater, and certainly a more beneficial employment to our own capital and labour...

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