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To such an extent had this trade been carried in 1816, that a member of Congress from Virginia introduced a resolution in the House,' That a committee be appointed to inquire into the existence of an inhuman and illegal traffic in slaves carried on in and through the District of Columbia, and report whether any, and what measures are necessary for putting a stop to the same.'

CHAPTER XVII.

REASONS FOR DISCUSSING THE SUBJECT

OF SLAVERY AT THE NORTH.

1. Because it is American slavery,

2. Because the North contributes its share towards its support.

(1.) Its money in building prisons in the District of Columbia, where slaves are kept.

(2.) Its representatives and senators in Congress who virtually vote for its continuance.

(3.) Its portion of men, christians and ministers of the gospel, who go to the South and become slaveholders.

3. We are obligated by the United States' laws to deliver up slaves who escape to us for refuge.

4. Because northern blood is liable to be spilt in case of insurrection at the South.

5. Because the slaveholding principle exists at the North, as really as at the South. The continuance of the system is justified here by Christians and ministers, on the same ground, on which it is justified there, by the slaveholders themselves.

6. We discuss this subject at the North, because as long as slavery exists in this nation our own liberties are insecure. See the case of Dr. Crandall, a citizen of N. York, who was incarcerated in Wash. ington jail, for eight months, merely on suspicion of his being an abolitionist. Other citizens from the North have, by simply venturing to the South, lost both their liberty and their lives.

7. Because it is our right and privilege to discuss this question. The United States and the State in which we live, have guaranteed to us the freedom of speech, and of the press.

8. Because God has commanded his servants to open their mouths for such as cannot plead for themselves.

9. Because to neglect this subject would endanger the salvation of millions of souls, for whom Christ died.

10 Because slavery is a reproach to the nation which every lover of his country should be anxious to do away.

11. Because we should do, as we would be done by.

12. Because, without discussion, slavery will never be abolished, and it must be discussed here or no where, in the nation.

CHAPTER XVIII.

AMERICAN SLAVE TRADE.

The following items may serve as specimens to show the reader how Americans in this republic are bought and sold.

Specimen of a New Orleans advertisement, When we ask emancipation for slaves like those described below, we are told, that they could not

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take care of themselves, and if emancipated, they would starve to death ! Valuable SERVANTS for sale at auction, by Isaac L. M'Coy.

This day Thursday, 27th inst., at 12 o'clock, at the Exchange Coffee House, will be sold 34 VALUABLE SERVANTS, viz :

1. Harry, aged about 26 years; a first rate cartman, axeman and sawyer; has been accustomed to work in a saw-mill and wood-yard; has been about 8 years in the country, and understands the care and management of horses, and possesses an excellent character.

2. George, aged about 23 years; has been about 8 years in the country; is a good carter and axeman, and has been accustomed to work in a wood.yard and bakery.

3. Altimore, aged about 21 years; a first rate sawyer and axeman; aceustomed to work in a wood-yard, has been 3 or 4 years in the country.

4. Barney, aged about 18 years; a first rate negro, and handy at almost all kinds of work; has been accustomed to work in a wood-yard, and has been about 4 years in the country.

5. Henry Buckner, aged about 29 years; a good axeman, sawyer and field hand, accustomed to work in a wood-yard, and has been about six years in the country.

6. Lewis, aged about 20 years; a first rate hand in a wood-yard, an excellent butcher, a good field hand; speaks French and English, and has been about 10 years in the country.

7. Sam Crumo, aged about 22 years; a first rate hand in a wood-yard ; a carter; speaks French and English, and has been about twelve years in the country.

8. Little Ned, aged about 18 years; a good hand for a wood-yard; has been one year in the country. A

9. Big Ned, aged about 22 years; do. do. do."

10. Ben, aged about 20 years ; do. I do.

11. Aaron, aged about 33 years; a first rate hand for a wood-yard, in which he has been employed for many years; is an excellent cartman; has been about 15 years in the country, and speaks both languages.

do.

12. Dick Jackson, aged about 25 years; a good axeman and sawyer, and an excellent hand' for a woodyard, to which he is accustomed, and has been one year in the country.

13. Dick Morgan, aged about 39 years; a very honest, trusty servant; has acted as porter in a grocery store for several years, and has worked for several years in a rope walk and wood-yard; is an excellent axeman and sawyer; has been in the country since a child, and speaks French and English.

14. Dillard, aged about 31 years; a good cook, a good axeman and sawyer; has worked about 4 years in a wood-yard, and has been about 4 years in the country.

- 15. Charles Palmer, aged about 24 years; accustomed to work in a wood-yard : is a good axeman, carter and field hand, and has been about 4 years in the country.

16. Daniel, aged about 18 years a first rate house servant; is very trusty; a tolerable good cook; has been raised in the country; speaks French and English, and possesses a first rate character.

17. Anthony, aged about 15 years; a first rate houseservant; very trusty and active; a good sawyer; has been raised in the country, and possesses a first rate character.

18. Joseph, aged about 14 years; a first rate servant; handy at all kinds of work; has been accustomed to work in a wood-yard, and has been about 2 years in the country.

19. William, aged about 20 years; a good rough carpenter; a good coachman; has been 5 years in the country; speaks French and English, the title only guaranteed.

20. Ned, aged about 39 years; a good carpenter and ostler; has been about 4 years in the country, and is subject to rheumatism.

21. Robert, aged about 23 years; a rough blacksmith and carpenter; handy at all kinds of work; understands filing and setting saws, has been 8 years in the ccuntry, speaks Erench and English; is a first rate servant, and possesses a first rate character in every respect. «

22. Peter, aged about 35 years; is a first rate overseer, and has always been employed in that capacity; has

been for 5 years in Opelousas, and about 4 years in NewOrleans, is very honest and trusty, and a first rate servant in every respect.

23. Diana, aged about 24 years ; (wife of Peter) a first rate house servant, washer, ironer and plaiter ; a good cook; has been 5 years in the country ;. speaks French and English, and possesses a first rate character.

24. Malinda, aged about 24 years; a good house servant; a tolerable good washer and ironer; has been raised in the country; and speaks both languages.

25. Chloe, aged about 18 years; an excellent house servant; was born in Mobile; bas been about one year in New Orleans, and possesses an excellent character.

26. Daphney, aged about 25 years; a first rate cook, both in French and English style, and a good pastry cook; was raised in Mississippi, has been 7 years in New Orleans, and possesses an excellent character.

27. Catharine, aged about 27 years, a good field nand; was raised in the country; speaks French, Spanish and English; title only guaranteed.

ALSO. The following ORPHAN(!!) children, viz : 28. John, aged about 12 years. 29. James, aged about 11 years. 30. David, aged about 9 years. 31. Cyrus, aged about 9 years. They have been about months in the country. 32. Yellow Alex, aged about 8 years. 33. Black Alex, aged about 8 years. 34. Abraham, aged about 5 years.

The slaves are all thoroughly acclimated, and, with the exceptions above stated, are all guaranteed against the diseases and vices prescribed by law.

TERMS.-One half of the purchase money payable on the first of May, 1835, and one half on the first of May, 1836, for notes drawn and endorsed to the satisfaction of the seller, and secured by mortgage until the final pay. ment. The slaves will only be delivered after the acts are signed, and the notes delivered and approved. Bills of sale to be passed before W. Y. Lewis, Esq., Notary Public, at the expense of the purchaser.—New Orleans paper.

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