Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters, Volúmenes5-6

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Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters, 1882
Vol. 9, Appendix: Catalog of the Library of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, 1893.
 

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Página 26 - Sed privati ac separati agri apud eos nihil est, neque longius anno remanere uno in loco incolendi causa licet.
Página 167 - Her waggon-spokes made of long spinners' legs, The cover of the wings of grasshoppers, <*> The traces of the smallest spider's web, The collars of the moonshine's watery beams...
Página 172 - Every particle of matter, in the universe, attracts every other particle with a force, which is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
Página 51 - ... others a part of their stock of things, useful or pleasant. Take, for instance, a mortgage of a thousand pounds on a landed estate ; this is wealth to the person to whom it brings in a revenue, and who could perhaps sell it in the market for the full amount of the debt. But it is not wealth to the country ; if the engagement were annulled the country would be neither poorer nor richer ; the mortgagee would have lost a thousand pounds, and the owner of the land would have gained it.
Página 174 - ... submitting to no rule, incapable of being taught : the substance and the form alike disclosing a happy union of the soul of the author to the subject of his thought, having, therefore, individuality without personal predominance: and withal, there must be a sense of felicity about it, declaring it to be the product of a happy moment, so that you feel...
Página 133 - They bear the mandate ; they must sweep my way, And marshal me to knavery. Let it work ; For 'tis the sport to have the engineer Hoist with his own petar : and 't shall go hard But I will delve one yard below their mines, And blow them at the moon : O, 'tis most sweet, When in one line two crafts directly meet.
Página 309 - The walls of the octagon are very bold ; and, where they have been least subject to cultivation, are now between eleven and twelve feet in height by about fifty feet base. The wall of the circle is much less, nowhere measuring over four or five feet in altitude. In all these respects, as in the absence of a ditch and the presence of the two small circles, this work resembles the Hopeton Works.
Página 156 - Is it unreasonable to confess that we believe in God; not by reason of the Nature which conceals Him, but by reason of the Supernatural in Man, which alone reveals and proves Him to exist...
Página 50 - ... or pleasure. To an individual, anything is wealth, which, though useless in itself, enables him to claim from others a part of their stock of things useful or pleasant. Take, for instance, a mortgage of a thousand pounds on a landed estate. This is wealth to the person to whom it brings in a revenue, and who could perhaps sell it in the market for the full amount of the debt. But it is not wealth to the country; if the engagement were annulled, the country would be neither poorer nor richer.
Página 170 - So am I as the rich, whose blessed key Can bring him to his sweet up-locked treasure, The which he will not every hour survey, For blunting the fine point of seldom pleasure. Therefore are feasts so solemn and so rare, Since, seldom coming, in the long year set, Like stones of worth they thinly placed are, Or captain jewels in the carcanet.

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