Halleck's International Law, Or, Rules Regulating the Intercourse of States in Peace and War, Volumen1

Portada
Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1893
 

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Contenido

Questions agitated
23
Regulations of British navy
24
Regulations of French navy
25
Regulations of Spanish navy
26
Regulations of United States army and navy
27
Judicial decisions
28
Questions agitated in Europe
34
CHAPTER II
46
Objections to this
52
Decisions of prize courts
59
Treaties and compacts
62
A personal union
71
15
72
When a new State may be recognised Opinion of Judge
79
State sovereignty how lost
89
Interference in dependent States
95
By invitation of contending factions
102
Only within its own territory Foreign bonds Law
108
Case of the Caroline
115
Claims of the Pope and of the Emperor of Germany
116
12
122
CHAPTER VI
146
Prerogative
147
PARA
148
Jura majestatis and regalia
149
Property and domain
150
Right of eminent domain
153
Modes of acquisition 154
154
Patrimonial kingdoms
155
Inhabitants of such kingdoms
156
Maritime territory and territorial jurisdiction
158
Coasts and shores
163
Principle of the kings chambers
165
281
166
Claims to portions of the sea 19 Danish Sound dues
168
Mare clausum and mare liberum 21 The Black Sea and Dardanelles
169
The great lakes and their outlets 23 Navigable rivers as boundaries 24 Changes in dividing rivers and lakes
171
Effects on boundaries
172
Textwriters
173
Use of their banks 174 28 Right of innocent passage
174
The Rhine and other great river 175 31 Of other rivers
175
The Mississippi 176 33 The St Lawrence
177
App The Franconia case
180
Rights of Legislation and Jurisdiction PARA PAGE 1 Exclusive power of legislation
186
Law of real property
187
Law of contracts
189
Exceptions to the rule of comity
190
Rule of judicial proceedings
192
Law of personal capacity and duty
193
Droit daubaine and droit de rétraction
194
Law of escheat
195
Foreign divorces
202
Laws of trade and navigation
204
Laws of bankruptcy
205
Public and private vessels on the high seas
215
Private vessels in foreign ports
230
Summary of the judicial powers of a State
232
Extradition of criminals
235
Criminal sentences
239
Foreign judgments 31 Judgment of prize courts c in rem
241
Courts how far judges of their own jurisdiction
242
Proof of foreign laws
243
Of contracts and instruments
244
Of foreign judgments
246
App Treaties of extradition
257
Rights of Legation and Treaty 1 Right of legation essential to sovereignty 2 Of semisovereign States
269
Refusal to receive a particular person
271
Conditional reception
272
What department may send and receive Art of diplomacy
273
By influence of powerful neighbours
274
Treaties with dependent States
275
Treatymaking power
276
the Seven Years
277
Legislation to give effect to treaties 16 Under the constitution of the United States
280
Case of Great Britain in 1824
281
How far a treaty operates proprio vigore 20 Real and personal treaties
282
Other divisions 22 Equal and unequal treaties 23 Of guarantee and surety
283
22
284
Of amity or friendship 27 Of commerce boundaries
286
Violation of the faith of treaties
287
Use of an oath and asseveration in treaties 30 Conditions to make a treaty binding
289
Attempts of the Popes to annul the obligations of treaties 32 Guarantees and securities
292
Duration of guarantees and withdrawal of pledges
293
Effect of loss of sovereignty
295
Remarks of Kent and Wheaton on the interpretation of 296 38 Rules of Grotius
296
Vattels rules
297
Collision of stipulations
301
Paley on promises
302
Other modern writers
303
Importance of wellestablished principles
304
Breach of a treaty of peace
306
CHAPTER X
325
Reason of their authority
355
CHAPTER XI
369
Consuls of Christian States in the East
386
Acts of Congress of United States for carrying treaties into
392
Constitution of these tribunals
398
Leaving and returning to native country 430
401
Divisions of domicil
416
Evidence to repel the presumption
422
285
426
Of treaties
428
This character differs from that derived from domicil
437
CHAPTER XIV
463
286
472
CHAPTER XV
488
424
549

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Página 88 - ... is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers ; to consider the government de facto as the legitimate government for us ; to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve those relations by a frank, firm, and manly policy ; meeting, in all instances, the just claims of every power, submitting to injuries from none.
Página 87 - In the wars of the European powers, in matters relating to themselves, we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy so to do.
Página 282 - But when the terms of the stipulation import a contract, when either of the parties engages to perform a particular act, the treaty addresses itself to the political, not the judicial department; and the legislature must execute the contract before it can become a rule for the Court.
Página 87 - Of events in that quarter of the globe with which we have so much intercourse, and from which we derive our origin, we have always been anxious and interested spectators. The citizens of the United States cherish sentiments the most friendly in favor of the liberty and happiness of their fellow-men on that side of the Atlantic.
Página 173 - Majesty shall be continued westward along the said forty-ninth parallel of north latitude to the middle of the channel which separates the continent from Vancouver's Island, and thence southerly through the middle of the said channel, and of Fuca's Straits to the Pacific Ocean...
Página 86 - It was stated at the commencement of the last session that a great effort was then making in Spain and Portugal to improve the condition of the people of those countries, and that it appeared to be conducted with extraordinary moderation. It need scarcely be remarked that the result has been, so far, very different from what was then anticipated. Of events in that quarter of the globe with which we have so much intercourse, and from which we derive our origin, we have always been...
Página 88 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers...
Página 86 - At the proposal of the Russian Imperial Government, made through the minister of the Emperor residing here, a full power and instructions have been transmitted to the minister of the United States at St. Petersburg to arrange by amicable negotiation the respective rights and interests of the two nations on the northwest coast of this continent.
Página 300 - ... with any state or people, for the purpose of erecting or maintaining any such fortifications, or of occupying, fortifying, or colonizing Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito coast, or any part of Central America, or of assuming or exercising dominion over the same...
Página 179 - States, subject to any laws and regulations of either country within its own territory not inconsistent with such privilege of free navigation.

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