INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF INTERNATIONAL LAW

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Method pursued in this work
35
CHAPTER I
36
Essential attributes of a state Sovereignty independence equality all included in sovereignty May be parted with by confederated and by protected stat...
37
Obligations not affected by change of government
38
2 Comity
39
It knows only governments de facto
40
Assistance to provinces in revolt unlawful but aid to another state against rebellion lawful
41
Noninterference the rule but with exceptions Interference when justified
42
Interference to preserve the balance of power
43
Historical illustrations of such interference
44
Interference to prevent revolutions
45
Instances of such interference in the French revolution The holy alliance Congress of TroppauLaybach Congress of Verona
46
Property of states what in international law?
52
CHAPTER III
58
Exterritoriality its limits as to sovereigns ships of war armies in transit
64
The Monroe doctrine 48 Results of an attempt to establish a law of interference in the internal affairs of states
70
Interference in the Belgic revolution of 1830
76
General comity between nations
82
Origin of the privilege of ambassadors
88
Treaties made by a limited sovereign
99
Commencement of war Declaration Greek and Roman practice Mediae val practice Modern Reasons for the modern usage
115
What notice of a state of war ought to be given?
116
Effects of war Nonintercourse with the enemy License to trade
117
Enemys property within a belligerent country
118
Have all in each hostile state a right to wage war?
119
Treatment of enemys property on land and sea compared
120
Forces employed in war especially on the sea Privateers
121
Evils of privateering Testimony to these evils Endeavors to stop it by treaty Declaration of Paris 1856 Attitude of the United States
122
Restrictions on privateering to prevent its evils
123
Laws and usages of war somewhat vague yet improving Causes of this amelioration
124
Fundamental rules of
125
Retaliation
126
Special rules 1 as to weapons and ways of injuring an enemys person
127
2 Allowable weapons in war 3 Breach of faith Solicitations to crime 128 4 Treatment of captured persons especially of soldiers 5 Treatment of irre...
128
Summing
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7 Public property
131
8 Sieges and storms of forts and towns
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Laws of war on the
133
Neutral property in armed enemies vessels
177
Contraband of
178
What goods are contraband in the usage of nations?
179
Results as to deciding what articles are contraband Occasional contraband
180
Is it just and sanctioned hr usage? Opinions in respect to
181
Preemption English practice in cases of preemption
182
Penalty for contraband at sea Treaty modifying the penalty
183
Neutrals carrying the enemys despatches Case of the Trent
184
Trade closed in peace but open in
185
Blockade What places can be blockaded? Why is a breach of blockade unlawful? Validity of a blockade Paper or cabinet blockades un lawful
186
INTERNATIONAL LAW AND USAGE IN A STATE OF
187
Penalty for breach of blockade Duration of liability to penalty
188
Attempts to stretch the doctrine of blockade Prussian decree Berlin decree First and second orders in council Milan decree British or ders in council o...
189
The right of search Its narrow limits Duty of submitting to it Treaties often regulate the right
190
Is there a right of convoy? Historical illustrations
191
Its justice considered
192
Neutrals under belligerent convoy
193
Search during peace to execute revenue laws
194
Searcn on suspicion of piracy
195
Search of foreign vessels suspected of being slavers unauthorized
196
But conceded by treaties between most of the European states Examples of such treaties
197
Obligations of the United States in regard to the slavetrade Resolutions of Congress Feb 28 1823 Negotiations in England and convention of 1824 a...
198
Treaty of Washington in 1842 Practice under the treaty 200 Wbat does the right of search mean? Doctrine held by the United States
200
Defects of international law 1 Its uncertainty
203
Its prospects for the future
209
Commercia belli
229
Spies Section III Of Civil Wars Wars with Savages Piracy and the Slavetrade 136 Civil wars Wars with savages
230
New discussion concerning the right in 1858 1859 New arrangement with Great Britain in 1862
235
Capture in general especially from enemies 140 Property in prizes how and when begun?
238
Truce or armistice
251
CHAPTER II
261
Obligations of neutrals to be impartial
269
Rights of neutrals Case of the Caroline
288
92c 5 Freedom of private worship
376
Selection of works relating to international
435
Municipal laws enforcing neutrality
469
92d 6 Privileges of ambassadors family and train
473

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Página 219 - Thou shalt not smite them: wouldest thou smite those whom thou hast taken captive with thy sword and with thy bow? set bread and water before them, that they may eat and drink, and go to their master.
Página 454 - An Act to regulate the conduct of Her Majesty's subjects during the existence of hostilities between foreign States with which Her Majesty is at peace.
Página 317 - And whereas it frequently happens that vessels sail for a port or place belonging to an enemy, without knowing that the same is besieged, blockaded, or invested, it is agreed, that every vessel, so circumstanced, may be turned away from such port or place, but shall not be detained, nor shall any part of her cargo, if not contraband, be confiscated, unless, after warning of such blockade or investment, from the commanding officer of the blockading forces, she shall again attempt to enter...
Página 68 - ... we could not view any interposition for the purpose of oppressing them, or controlling in any other manner their destiny, by any European power, in any other light than as a manifestation of an unfriendly disposition towards the United States.
Página 85 - The character of our coast, remarkable in considerable parts of it for admitting no vessels of size to pass near the shores, would entitle us in reason to as broad . a margin of protected navigation as any nation whatever.
Página 309 - ... reasonable compensation for the loss such arrest shall occasion to the proprietors ; and it shall further be allowed to use in the service of the...
Página 454 - ... in that behalf by the government of the foreign state to which such owner belongs, to make application to the Court of Admiralty for seizure and detention of such prize, and the Court shall, on due proof of the facts, order such prize to be restored.
Página 464 - ... on her register the fact and date of such warning, and if the same vessel shall again attempt to enter or leave the blockaded port, she will be captured and sent to the nearest convenient port for such proceedings against her and her cargo as prize as may be deemed advisable.
Página 146 - No State shall, without consent of Congress, enter into any agreement or Compact with a foreign power.

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