Women Theorists on Society and Politics

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Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press, 1998 M05 14 - 326 páginas

Revolution, abolition of slavery, public health care, welfare, violence against women, war and militarism — such issues have been debated for centuries. But much work done by women theorists on these traditional social and political topics is little known or difficult to obtain. This new anthology contains significant excerpts not normally included in standard collections.

Women Theorists on Society and Politics brings together scarce, previously unpublished and newly translated excerpts from works by such women theorists as Emilie du Ch^atelet, Germaine de Sta:el, Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, Flora Tristan, Harriet Martineau, Florence Nightingale, Beatrice Webb and Jane Addams. It focuses on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century writers, but also includes some selections from as early as the Renaissance and late seventeenth century.

Introductions to the material, biographical background and secondary sources enhance this important collection. Women Theorists on Society and Politics provides essential theory on standard topics and a balance to the anthologies of feminist writing now more commonly available.

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Contenido

CHAPTER 1 Introduction
1
CHAPTER 2 Early Theorists
9
CHAPTER 3 Theorists on Revolution
47
CHAPTER 4 Theorists on Social Reform
129
CHAPTER 5 Theorists on Gender and Violence
231
CHAPTER 6 Theorists on Peace War and Militarism
259
CHAPTER 7 An Afterword
295
Manuscript Sources
299
Bibliography
301
Index
315
Derechos de autor

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Pasajes populares

Página 292 - Absolute freedom of navigation upon the seas, outside territorial waters, alike in peace and in war, except as the seas may be closed in whole or in part by international action for the enforcement of international covenants.
Página 43 - To this war of every man against every man, this also is consequent : that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law: where no law, no injustice. Force and fraud are in war the two cardinal virtues. Justice and injustice are none of the faculties neither of the body nor mind. If they were they might be in a man that were alone in the world, as well as his senses, and passions. They are qualities...
Página 42 - Hereby it is manifest that during the time men live without a common power to keep them all in awe, they are in that condition which is called war; and such a war as is of every man against every man.
Página 86 - The end of all political associations is the preservation of the natural and imprescriptible rights of man; and these rights are liberty, property, security, and resistance of oppression.
Página 220 - The property which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable. The patrimony of a poor man...
Página 43 - ... consequently no culture of the earth; no navigation nor use of the commodities that may be imported by sea; no commodious building; no instruments of moving and removing such things as require much force; no knowledge of the face of the earth; no account of time; no arts; no letters; no society; and, which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death; and the life of man solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.
Página 58 - Government is a contrivance of human wisdom to provide for human wants. Men have a right that these wants should be provided for by this wisdom.
Página 42 - ... the nature of war as it is in the nature of weather. For as the nature of foul weather lieth not in a shower or two of rain, but in an inclination thereto of many days together ; so the nature of war consisteth not in actual fighting, but in the known disposition thereto, during all the time there is no assurance to the contrary.
Página 44 - The passions that incline men to peace are: fear of death; desire of such things as are necessary to commodious living; and a hope by their industry to obtain them.
Página 58 - Society requires not only that the passions of individuals should be subjected, but that even in the mass and body as well as in the individuals, the inclinations of men should frequently be thwarted, their will controlled, and their passions brought into subjection.

Acerca del autor (1998)

Lynn McDonald, a professor of sociology at the University of Guelph, is the author of The Early Origins of the Social Science and The Women Founders of the Social Sciences. She is a former Member of Parliament and a former president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women. She is senior editor for the collected works of Florence Nightingale (in progress).

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