MacMillan's Magazine, Volumen49

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Sir George Grove, David Masson, John Morley, Mowbray Morris
1884
 

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Página 409 - Earth has not anything to show more fair : Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning; silent, bare, Ships, towers,, domes, theatres, and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Página 337 - I compare human life to a large mansion of many apartments, two of which I can only describe, the doors of the rest being as yet shut upon me. The first we step into we call the Infant, or Thoughtless Chamber, in which we remain as long as we do not think.
Página 338 - I shall call the Chamber of Maiden-Thought, than we become intoxicated with the light and the atmosphere, we see nothing but pleasant wonders, and think of delaying there for ever in delight. However among the effects this breathing is father of is that tremendous one of sharpening one's vision into the heart and nature of Man — of convincing one's nerves that the world is full of Misery and Heartbreak, Pain, Sickness and oppression...
Página 338 - To this point was Wordsworth come, as far as I can conceive, when he wrote "Tintern Abbey," and it seems to me that his Genius is explorative of those dark Passages. Now if we live, and go on thinking, we too shall explore them.
Página 337 - Every man has his speculations, but every man does not brood and peacock over them till he makes a false coinage and deceives himself.
Página 336 - I have given up Hyperion — there were too many Miltonic inversions in it — Miltonic verse cannot be written but in an artful, or, rather, artist's humour. I wish to give myself up to other sensations. English ought to be kept up.
Página 332 - I know nothing — I have read nothing — -and I mean to follow Solomon's directions, " Get learning — get understanding." I find earlier days are gone by — I find that I can have no enjoyment in the world but continual drinking of knowledge.
Página 334 - Now while the early budders are just new, And run in mazes of the youngest hue About old forests ; while the willow trails Its delicate amber ; and the dairy pails Bring home increase of milk.
Página 338 - ... how astonishingly does the chance of leaving the world impress a sense of its natural beauties upon us ! Like poor Falstaff, though I do not " babble," I think of green fields ; I muse with the greatest affection on every flower I have known from my infancy — their shapes and colours are as new to me as if I had just created them with a superhuman fancy.
Página 192 - The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite; a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.

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