Belonging to the Army: Camp Followers and Community During the American Revolution

Portada
Univ of South Carolina Press, 1999 - 307 páginas

Belonging to the Army reveals the identity and importance of the civilians now referred to as camp followers, whom Holly A. Mayer calls the forgotten revolutionaries of the War for American Independence. These merchants, contractors, family members, servants, government officers, and military employees provided necessary supplies, services, and emotional support to the troops of the Continental Army. Mayer describes their activities and demonstrates how they made encampments livable communities and played a fundamental role in the survival and ultimate success of the Continental Army. She also considers how the army wanted to be rid of the followers but were unsuccessful because of the civilians' essential support functions and determination to make camps into communities. Instead the civilians' assimilation gave an expansive meaning to the term belonging to the army.

 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

Custom Conflict and Camp Followers
1
A Continental Community
30
Sutlers and Other Suppliers
85
The Conjugal Family
122
The Extended Family
162
All Persons Serving with the Army
192
Subject to Orders and the Discipline of War
236
Contributors to a Glorious Work
270
Bibliography
279
Index
292
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (1999)

After four years on active duty in the U.S. Army, Holly A. Mayer returned to school to earn her Ph.D. at the College of William and Mary in Virginia. She is associate professor of history at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh.

Información bibliográfica