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but on the contrary are very troublesome and mischievous, therefore they do not like to see you; but they know that I am busy all day long making them honey. You had better pay them fewer visits and try to be useful."

Fa mil'iar, well acquainted; cu'ri ous (kū'rị us), of strange fashion, odd; contra ry (kõn'tra rỉ), on the other hand.

STUDY HELPS

What question did the wasp ask?
In what ways did he say he was equal to the bee?
In what ways superior?
How does he say people show their preference for the bee?
How does the bee explain it?

THE CAMEL AND THE PIG

P. V. RAMASWAMI RAJU

A camel said, “Nothing like being tall; look, how tall I am!”

A pig, who heard these words, said, “Nothing like being short; look, how short I am!”

The camel said, “Well, if I fail to prove the truth of what I said, I shall give up my hump.”

The pig said, “If I fail to prove the truth of what I have said, I shall give up my snout.”

Agreed!” said the camel.
“Just so!” said the pig.

They came to a garden, inclosed by a low wall without any opening. The camel stood on this side the wall and, reaching the plants within by means of his long neck, made a breakfast on them. Then he turned jeeringly

[graphic]

to the pig,

who had been standing

at the bottom of the wall, without even having a look at the good things in the garden, and said, “Now, would you be tall, or short?"

Next they came to a garden, inclosed by a high wall, with a wicket gate at one end. The pig entered by the gate,

and, after having eaten They came to a garden, inclosed by a low wall his fill of the vegetables

within came out, laughing at the poor camel, who had had to stay outside because he was too tall to enter the garden by the gate, and said, “Now, would you be tall, or short?”

Then they thought the matter over, and came to the conclusion that the camel should keep his hump and the pig his snout, observing,

“Tall is good, where tall would do;
Of short, again, 't is also true!”

From Folk Stories and Fables.

In closed' (în klõzd'), shut in; jeer'ing ly, in scornful manner; wăck'ět, a small, low gate within a wall or larger gate.

STUDY HELPS

What difference of opinion did the camel and the pig have?
What agreement did they make?
How did the camel and the pig each prove his point?
How could they both be right?
Repeat the conclusion they came to.

THE CAMEL AND THE PIG

(Dramatization) [Assign the parts: Camel and Pig. Let six or eight children form a hollow square, kneel, and join hands to represent the low wall around a garden. Have two or three children stand inside the wall to represent the plants. Not far away, have another garden formed by children standing around as a high wall. Leave a low opening for a gate. Place books in the garden for vegetables. Camel and Pig walk from different directions and meet.)

CAMEL: Good morning, Friend Pig!
Pig: Good morning, Friend Camel!

CAMEL: Nothing like being tall! Just see how tall I am. (Camel stretches himself and points upward.)

Pir: Nothing like being short, Friend Camel! See how short I am.

CAMEL: Oh, you think so, do you? Well, if I fail to prove that there is nothing like being tall I will give up my hump. (Touches his back.)

Pis: Ugh! Ugh! You will, will you? Well, if I fail to prove that there is nothing like being short, I will give up my snout. (Touches his nose.)

CAMEL: Agreed! Agreed!
Pig: Just so! Just so, Friend Camel!
(Camel and Pig walk slowly over to the garden inclosed

by the low wall, and stand beside it.) CAMEL: Ah! Here is a delicious breakfast for me. (Reaches over and eats.) These leaves are so juicy and fresh. Nothing could be sweeter or better. Now, would you be tall or short, Friend Pig? (Camel and Pig walk over to the other garden. Pig runs

to the low gate and into the garden.) Pig: Ah! Here are fresh cabbage and crisp turnips for my breakfast. (Pretends to eat them. They are most delicious. (Runs out, laughing, and says): Now, would you be tall, Friend Camel, or would you be short? Tell me, truly.

CAMEL: Well, it's all right to be tall when you want leaves.

Pir: Yes, and it's all right to be short when you want to go through a low gate.

CAMEL: Yes, yes, --sometimes it is better to be short.
Pig: And sometimes it is better to be tall; I see that.

CAMEL: Well, Pig, you keep your snout and I will keep my hump.

Pis: That's a bargain, and a fair one, too.
CAMEL and PIG:

Tall is good, where tall would do;
Of short, again, 't is also true!

[graphic][merged small][merged small]

Oh, tell me, little children, have you seen her-
The tiny maid from Norway, Nikolina?
Oh, her eyes are blue as cornflowers 'mid the corn,
And her cheeks are rosy as skies of morn!

Oh, buy the baby's blossoms if you meet her,
And stay with gentle words and looks to greet her;
She ʼll gaze at you and smile and clasp your hand,
But no word of your speech can understand.

Nikolina! Swift she turns if any call her,
As she stands among the poppies hardly taller,
Breaking off their flaming scarlet cups for you,
With spikes of slender larkspur, brightly blue.

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