History of the Origin, Formation, and Adoption of the Constitution of the United States: With Notices of Its Principal Framers, Volumen1

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Provides detailed information on Washington (p. 406-), Hamilton (p.420-), Franklin (p. 433-), Gouverneur Morris (p. 440-), King (p. 448-), Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (p. 454-), Wilson (p. 462-), and Randolph (p. 480-).

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Contenido

Royalists
36
H A P T E R III
49
JULY 1776November 1777
54
General Washingtons Position
55
Officers of the Royal Government in New Hampshire seized
70
CoNsequences of the DEcLARATION of INDEPENDENCE Reorg ANI
89
Promotion of the Officers provided for
95
Unsettled Condition of the Political System
101
Eminent Men retire from Congress
104
Formation of a new Army
110
States engaged in forming Governments
116
Union of the People of the United States as distinguished from
123
The present Congress compared with that of 1776
127
Assent of Maryland to the Confederation withheld
133
Progress of the People of the United States towards a National
139
Powers of Congress with regard to Internal Affairs
145
H A P T E R I
155
Impracticable Adherence to the Principles of Civil Liberty
161
Critical Position of the Country 326
163
Changes of the Members of Congress 126
165
Situation of Washington
167
FINANCIAL DIFFICULties of THE CoNFEDERATION RevolutionARY
172
Claims of the various Classes of the Public Creditors
178
Proofs of this in the History of the Confederation
184
Note on the HalfPay for the Officers of the Revolution
190
H A P T E R I I I
200
Hamiltons Entry into Congress
206
Advises General Taxes to be collected under Continental Authority
212
Hamilton advises Federal Provision for Defence
219
Improvement in the Revenue System
225
B O O K III
231
A New Congress
235
How to be obtained
241
Argument used in Support of her Refusal
247
State Laws prohibiting the Recovery of British Debts
253

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Página 498 - The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this Union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several States; and the people of each State shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other State, and shall enjoy therein all the privileges of trade and commerce, subject to the same duties,...
Página 499 - No vessels of war shall be kept up in time of peace by any State, except such number only, as shall be deemed necessary by the United States in Congress assembled, for the defence of such State, or its trade ; nor shall any body of forces be kept up by any State, in time of peace, except such number only, as in the judgment of the United States, in Congress assembled, shall be deemed requisite to garrison the forts necessary for the defence of such State...
Página 197 - STATES, and to consist of one delegate from each state; and to appoint such other committees and civil officers as may be necessary for managing the general affairs of the United States under their...
Página 256 - The said states hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other for their common defence, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.
Página 498 - ... more than three years in any term of six years ; nor shall any person, being a delegate, be capable of holding any office under the United States, for which he, or another for his benefit, receives any salary, fees, or emolument of any kind.
Página 296 - And whenever any of the said States shall have sixty thousand free inhabitants therein such State shall be admitted by its delegates into the Congress of the United States on an equal footing with the original states in all respects whatever, and shall be at liberty to form a permanent constitution and State government.
Página 499 - No State shall engage in any war without the consent of the United States in Congress assembled, unless such State be actually invaded by enemies, or shall have received certain advice of a resolution being formed by some nation of Indians to invade such State, and the danger is so imminent as not to admit of a delay, till the United States in Congress assembled can be consulted...
Página 137 - ... for the defence and welfare of the United States or any of them, nor emit bills, nor borrow money on the credit of the United States...
Página 501 - States, whose jurisdictions, as they may respect such lands, and the States which passed such grants, are adjusted, the said grants or either of them being at the same time claimed to have originated antecedent to such settlement of jurisdiction, shall, on the petition of either party to the Congress of the United States, be finally determined...
Página 502 - State should raise a greater number of men than the quota thereof, such extra number shall be raised, officered, clothed, armed, and equipped in the same manner as the quota of such State, unless the legislature of such State shall judge that such extra number cannot be safely spared out of the same, in which case they shall raise, officer, clothe, arm, and equip as many of such extra number as they judge can be safely spared.

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