Letters from head-quarters; or, The realities of the war in the Crimea, by an officer of the staff [baron Calthorpe].

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Página 233 - ... Canrobert in his capacity as Commander-in-Chief of the French army. batteries in front of the town. Sir George had pitched his tent in a stone-quarry, and it was just in front of it that he and his staff were partaking of their dinner. All at once they heard " Whiz — whiz —whiz— WHIZ, BANG!" and a shell exploded a few feet from them, to their intense disgust and the discomfiture of their dinner arrangements. On this being repeated a second time, they thought it more prudent to shift their...
Página 314 - Lord Raglan wishes the cavalry to advance rapidly to the front - follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. Troop Horse Artillery may accompany. French cavalry is on your left. Immediate.
Página 317 - Such was not the case, as ho remained unhurt ; however, his horse took fright — swerved round — and galloped off with him to the rear, passing on the way by the 4th Light Dragoons and 8th Hussars before those regiments got up to the battery...
Página 177 - This magnificent division — the flower of the British army — had crossed the river rather higher up than the Light Division, and consequently were on its left. The attention of the enemy being chiefly taken up in repelling the attack of Sir George Brown, the 1st Division had formed-up after crossing the Alma ; and although they incurred considerable loss in so doing, they nevertheless advanced in most beautiful order; really as if on parade. I never shall forget that sight — one felt so proud...
Página 218 - ... morning. The troops were allowed to pillage such of the waggons as did not contain anything of use to the commissariat or artillery ; and, consequently, in a few moments the ground was strewed with every sort of thing — handsome Hussar uniforms, rich fur cloaks, every kind of under garment, VOL. I. L male and female. Several wigs I saw being offered for sale, amidst the laughter of the men. French books and novels of an improper kind were not unfrequently met with in the baggage of the Russian...
Página 316 - Letters from headquarters, or the realities of the War in the Crimea, by an officer on the staff, 2 vols. Murray, 1856. Here in a few words is a picture of the horrors of war. At Balaklava, — Captain Nolan galloped some way in front of his brigade . . . was the first man killed ; some grape-shot hit him in the chest ; his horse turned and carried him to the rear through our advancing squadrons. His screams were heard far above the din of battle, and he fell dead from his saddle near the spot where...
Página 183 - The men were tired, and many almost exhausted for want of water. Lord Raglan rode up and down the line of troops, the men cheering him vociferously. There was such a shaking of hands; one felt very choky about the throat, and very much inclined to cry, as one wrung the hand of a friend; and 'God bless you, old fellow — so glad to see you all right!' and like expressions, were heard on every side between brother officers. It was a touching sight to see the meeting between Lord Raglan and Sir Colin...
Página 418 - A sergeant approached us, carrying canteens of water to take up for the wounded, and as Lord Raglan passed, he drew himself up to make the usual salute, when a round shot came bounding over the hill, and knocked his forage-cap off his head. The man calmly picked up his cap, dusted it on his knee, placed it carefully on his head, and then made the military salute, and all without moving a muscle of his countenance. Lord Raglan was delighted with the man's coolness, and said to him, "A near thing that,...
Página 40 - ... rations our men have than theirs. Yet, if you were to believe the English newspapers, everything we have is not to be compared to the French. Somehow or other, I don't know how it is, but the reporters of the English journals have made themselves very unpopular. They appear to try and find fault whenever they can, and throw as much blame and contempt on the English authorities as if their object was to bring the British army into disrepute with our allies. Altogether they seem to write in a bad...
Página 310 - ... while the dark mass of Russian cavalry wheeled past a few hundred yards away. Cardigan's own account, however, is very specific. I entirely deny that Captain Morris ever pointed out to me any opportunity of charging the enemy, or said anything to me of the kind ; and it is quite untrue that I said I was placed in that particular spot, and should not move without orders, or anything to that effect. I further deny that Captain Morris ever begged to be allowed to charge with his regiment alone,...

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