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Private School for Boys Mr. J. B. Frames
Seminary for Young Ladies Mrs. Eedes
Medical Practitioners J. Chalmers, and R. L. Davies, Esqrs.
Apothecaries

Messrs. J. L. Tillbury and G. Dunsterville Auctioneers

Messrs. W. Harries, Joshua Norton, Geo.

Britton, and George Mitchell DIRECTORS OF THE JETTY COMPANY, PORT ELIZABETH. Engineer

John Thornhill, Esq. Managers

Pieter Heugh, J. Blackburn, Wm. Smith,

and J. C. Chase, Esqrs. Secretary

Mr. John Bailie
Managing Director of the

D.
Boating Company
Clerk

Mr. Thomas Yatton

.

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LEPER INSTITUTION AT BAKEN'S RIVER.
Superintending Surgeon R. L. Davies, Esq.
Superintendent

Mr. Richard Tee, Senior
UNION CHAPEL, LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY.
Minister

Rev. A. Robson
Elders

Messrs. G. Chick and D, Lewis
Deacons

Messrs. James Beans and J. Kitchen
Instructor of the Fingoes Mr. W. Passmore
Teacher to the coloured

Mrs. Robson
People

WESLEYAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY. Minister

Rev. John Green

Messrs. Wm. Cawood, Samuel Cawood, Committee

Joseph Cawood, Thomas Hancock, and

Thomas Sterley
Chapel Stewards

Messrs. T, Hancock and T. Sterley
Roman Catholic Church :-
Pastor

Rev. George D. Corcoran, O.S.F.
Clerk

Mr. James McCloughlan
Undertakers

Messrs. J. B. Board and Joseph Williams Hotels

Mr. Nathaniel Randall
Mr. E. H. Salmond, Port Elizabeth

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Phenix Hotei

MILITARY DEPARTMENTS AT PORT ELIZABETH. Commandant of Fort Fre

derick

:} Capt. F. Evatt

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ROUTE FROM CAPE TOWN TO'GRAHAM'S TOWN.
Travelling at the Rate of Six Miles an Hour.

Hrs. Min. From Cape Town to Eerste River, to the Drift at Mr. Blom

mestein's, (an excellent house of accommodation, clean,

comfortable, and Mr. and Mrs. B. very civil and kind) Thence to Hindley's, Sir Lowry's Pass

15 To Palmiet River

1 30 To Bot River, Field-cornet de Kock

15 To Matjes Drift

0 To Field-cornet Jan Linde, (Mr. and Mrs. L. very civil and attentive to travellers

4 0 To Field-cornet Eksteen

15 To Field-cornet Human

3 30 To Swellendam, (Crause's Hotel)

2 0 To Field-cornet P. Uys

0 To Niekerk, Duivenhok's River

2 15 To Human

1 0 To Riversdale, (Villiers,)

3 0 To Jan du Preez, Kafferkuil's River

1 0 To Oosthuysen, Tygerfontein

4 0 To Gourits River

2 0 To Jan Meyer, Field-cornet, (as nice a family as any

in the Colony, an excellent house, and nothing can
exceed the kindness of Mr. & Mrs. Meyer to every one

3 0 To M. Meyer, Geelbeks Valley

1 15 To Field-cornet Scholtz

2 30 To George, (Belfore's,)

2 30 To Rensburg, across Cradockberg

5 To Van Rooyen, Diep Rivier

2 0 To Wehmeyer

2 30 To Zondag, Avontuur, (civil people,)

1 0 To M. Heyns, Welgelegen

30 To Ignatius van Niekerk, Misgunst

2 30 To Ferreira

1 0 To C. Rademeyer

1 0 To Kritzinger, Wagenbooms Rivier

2 0 To H. Meeding, Jagersbosch, Kromme River, (very good

accommodation, comfortable place, and people very
kind and civil

4 0 To Hilgert du Preez, Essenbosch, (civil people, and

3 very clean accommodation

0 To Field-cornet Moolman, Leeuwenbosch

2 30 To Gamtoos River

3 30 To Field-cornet Nieukerk, Matjes Fontein, (civil people,) 1

30 To Utenhay, (Hotel kept by Mr. Slaughter, late

Streak's Hotel, this and Watson's Hotel at Wor.
cester, are the best in the colony. Nothing can ex-
ceed the kindness of Mr. and Mrs. S. to strangers
and travellers, and everything you get is good, in
fact, it is a perfect house of comfort

5 0 From Utenhay to Zondag's Rivier, at Row's, good accommodations

4 0

Hrs. Min. Thence to Bosjesman's River

5 0 To Sidbury, (Pollard's, good accommodations,)

1 30 To Graham's Town, (two good Hotels, Watson & Findlayson's,)

5 0

SUMMARY OF THE TRADE AND NAVIGATION OF

ALGOA BAY FOR THE YEAR 1842. Ninety-five Vessels; 14,495 Tons ; Customs' Duty, Fees, &c., £10,059 1ls. 11d. ; Total value of imports, £162,252 ; Total value of Esports, £99,674 16s. Apparent deficiency made up by Commissariat supplies; Sapplies to shipping missionary expenditure, &c. Increase of ships, 6; of tonnage, 3,595 : increase of Imports, £83,004 10s. Increase of Exports, £27,643 16s. Increase of Customs, £6,034 14s. lld.

PARTICULARS OF EXPORTS, THE PRODUCE OF ALGOA

BAY FROM THE YEAR 5TH OCTOBER, 1841–42.

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PORT ELIZABETH.
Aloes...
Beef and Pork
Bone (whale).
Butter.
Candles..
Corn, grain, and meal, viz:-

Beans and Peas.
Flour
Oats

Wheat
Feathers (ostrich)
Fish (dried)
Fruits (dried)
Hides (horse and ox)
Horns
Horses
Ivory ..
Oil, viz. Seal

Whale
Skins, viz, Calf

Goat
Seal

Sheep.
Tallow
Wax..
Wine, ordinary.
Wool..

195 muids, 1,980 pounds, 178 muids,

4 muids, 150 pounds, 66,880 pounds,

47 packages, 30,197 in number, 57,363 in number,

16 in number, 9,906 pounds,

57 gallons, 3,126 gallons,

105 in number, 94,386 in number,

348 in number, 6,390 in number, 169,387 pounds, 1,473 pounds,

17 pipes, 853,198 pounds,

282 0 0 13 0 0 56 0 0

4 0 0 726 0 0 274 0 0

66 0 0 19,494 0 0 1,066 0 0

475 0 0 1,964 0 0

5 0 0 235 0 0

43 0 0 9,503 0 350 0

183 0 0 2,8990

105 0 0

264 0 0 43,5600

Other Articles

92,451 0
2,147 0

0 0

Total

£94,598 00

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IMPORT OF CAPE PRODUCE INTO LONDON.
Wet
Kips &
Dry

Goat
Hides.

Seal.
Skins. Hides.

Sheep.

Horns.

Skins. 1840-16,806.. 9,856..1,316.. 90,985.. 37,334..2,829..102,555 1841--23,395..21,279..1,290..147,742.. 88,486..4,086.. 77,776 1842–34,798..32,840..1,458..178,397..116,004..3,336..120,838

1

The following three letters have appeared in the Emigration Gazette and Colonial Advocate :

COLONIAL IMPORTS.
Sir,--For the information of your readers I send you a summary of
the imports of colonial wool into England for the last year :-
N, S. Wales & Van Diemen's Land.

Cape & Algoa Bay.
1842
546,477 bales.

..6,521 bales. In 1841 they amounted to 46,581 bales.. .4,981 bales.

Bales decrease, 104 Bales increase, 1,543 There is not a tack taken by the colonies in which the Cape and Algoa Bay will not shew that the latter equal, if they are not beating, the Australian colonies ; and as regards quality the same holds good. Did people only know the relative advantages offered by each colony, and the exemption from convictism at the Cape, the surplus labour, which, from over supply is short paid in Australia, and rejected, thrown again upon our shores from America, would find its way to the Cape. Listen to it for an instant; a colony that could make ten million of people prosperous, has a population of only 220,000! a colony where there is not two-thirds of the mortality in Australia or Canada, and only one-half the distance to New Zealand and Australia.

It is singular, Mr. Editor, that last year from every country and every colony (excepting the Cape) there has been a decrease in their export of wool to the extent of 52,373 bales, which cannot be estimated at less than £125,000 loss in their productive resources; whereas the Cape has increased hers by upwards of 1,500 bales, in value £18,000 at the least; and this year it will be one-half more than the last year's produce, at the same relative increase of value.

X. P. R. Jan. 7th, 1843.

EMIGRATION WITHOUT TAXATION. Sir,--The happiest condition of a country is freedom: freedom from over legislation and from great taxation. I do not desire to apply this acknowledged principle to free trade, but to free Emigration, and free poor's rates. The country is in a difficult position, and Ministers do not know how to propose a grant of the public money for Emigration. Some persons disapprove of Emigration; perhaps because they, in their short-sightedness, do not like to be taxed for carrying it on, not remembering that if the poor leave our parishes, that poor's rates necessarily cease. Parishes cannot now compel Emigration, nor is it desira. ble that they should; but parishes and individuals sending away their quota of poor would and should be relieved from poor's-rates. For in stance I am assessed to the poor of my parish in £12 per annum. I dislike the notion of keeping Tom, the shepherd, in the Union, and he also

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wants to get out of it. It costs my parish £12 per annum to keep him in the Union; and yet the parish cannot send hiin to the Cape of Good Hope, where his calling is in much demand, where he would get from £30 to £45 per annum, besides board and lodging. Well, now, I want, Sir, to send Tom out to my farm, or any other person's farm, it being optional for him to go where he pleases. Therefore I suggest that an Act of Parliament should pass, allowing me to give Tom a passage to the Cape, which will cost me £12, which I am content to do at once if the parish officers or guardians only give me a receipt exempting me from the next year's poor's rates. In short, I purpose to pay my rates in advance. This act will require the parish officers to be consenting parties to the act; otherwise I might give a passage to a friend able to support himself, or to a man out of the parish, and so the rates would not at all be relieved. Suppose, again, that my rates amount to £6. only, let me receive exemption from poor's rates for two years; or myself and friend, each paying £6., let us both be exempted for one year. No one by this plan would be taxed; and every rate-payer, having a personal interest in some particular poor man or woman in his parish, would find his sympathies exercised in their welfare. He would say, I am not getting out of pocket in this: I am doing good to these respectable poor bodies on the very verge of receiving parish relief. I will let them chose the colony they like; and as really shall not be losing money by paying their passage, I will give each 20s. or 40s. for an outfit. Wbat pleasure, what good, what a restoration of proper feeling would not this excite! And why is the privilege not enjoyed! Because legislation does not sanction it. But why does no member propose it? Let us look at its extended adoption. The poor's rates last year amounted to just £4,000,000., for England and Wales alone. I will suppose that one-tenth of the rate-payers of one-tenth of that amount now at liberty by law to anticipate their rates, to relieve their parishes, and to promote Emigration without additional taxation. This, Sir, would give £400,000. for Emigration purposes, without any one paying a farthing more than he does at present; he simply anticipates his payment. This would enable 35,000 persons to go to the Cape of Good Hope, to a clime where mortality is less than in England, where provisions are cheaper, where wages are higher, where poverty is un. known, where education is freely given by Government free schools, where society is uncontaminated, where religious principles generally prevail, ,-a settled country, with all the difficulties of first settlement already overcome, and yet where Emigration not having set in strongly to lower wages, the highest remuneration is gladly given to all classes. Much good can be truly said of other colonies; and let landlords and rate-payers have the privilege of sending their poor labourers, willing to take the step, to the colony they prefer. I am thoroughly persuaded that, exemption granted from rates on this principle sanctioned by the parish authorities, in four years we should send forth the whole annual increase of our population, creating for us a demand for £2,000,000 of British manufactures, and in the same period, reduce our poor's-rates to about £2,000,000 instead of £4,000,000 send forth so many tillers of virgin soil, thereby giving us grain, hides, wool, flax, hemp, silk, cotton, coffee, oil, wine, raisins, and every other produce of our rich. varied, and productive colonies. Is not the hint worthy of being followed up by Sir Robert Peel or some philanthropic member? Feb. 16th, 1843.

J. S. C.

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