Correspondence Between Frances, Countess of Hartford, (afterwards Duchess of Somerset,) and Henrietta Louisa, Countess of Pomfret: Between the Years 1738 and 1741, Volumen1

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Página 119 - EPIGRAM, Engraved on the Collar of a Dog which I gave to his Royal Highness. I AM his Highness' dog at Kew: Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you ? EPIGRAM, Occasioned by an Invitation to Court.
Página vii - shine in courts With unaffected grace, or walk the plain With innocence and meditation joined In soft assemblage, listen to my song, Which thy own season paints, when Nature all Is blooming and benevolent, like thee.
Página 272 - We have no relics of the saint ; but we have an old covered bench with many remains of the wit of my lord Bathurst's visitors, who inscribed verses upon it. Here is the writing of Addison, Pope, Prior, Congreve, Gay, and what he esteemed no less, of several fine ladies. I cannot say that the verses answered my...
Página 272 - Thy son, and his, ere that, may die, And Time some uncouth heir supply, Who shall for nothing else be known But spoiling all that thou hast done. Who set the twigs shall he remember That is in haste to sell the timber? And what shall of thy woods remain, Except the box that threw the main?
Página viii - Spring" was published next year, with a dedication to the Countess of Hertford, whose practice it was to invite every summer some poet into the country, to hear her verses and assist her studies. This honour was one summer conferred on Thomson, who took more delight in carousing with Lord Hertford and his friends than assisting her ladyship's poetical operations, and therefore never received another summons. "Autumn," the season to which the "Spring" and "Summer" are preparatory, still remained unsung,...
Página 205 - Epictetus, has to write an Ode to Melancholy (and odes to Melancholy, to Concord, to Ambition, are the staple of the volumes) she begins :— ' Come, melancholy, silent pow'r, Companion of my lonely hour, To sober thought confin'd; Thou sweetly-sad ideal guest, In all thy soothing charms confest. Indulge my pensive mind !' When Mr. Henley writes an Ode to...
Página 160 - Oglethorpe, and returned to take priest's orders, which he did ; and I believe, since that time, hardly a day has passed that he has not preached, and generally twice. At first he and some of his brethren seemed only to aim at restoring the practice of the primitive Christians as to daily sacraments, stated fasts, frequent...
Página 206 - In death's refreshing shade. Ye pale inhabitants of night, Before my intellectual sight, In solemn pomp ascend : O tell how trifling now appears The train of idle hopes and fears That varying life attend ! Ye faithless idols of our sense, Here own how vain your fond pretence, Ye empty names of joy, Your transient forms like shadows pass; Frail offspring of the magic glass Before the mental eye. The dazzling colours falsely bright, Attract the gazing vulgar sight, With superficial state : Thro...
Página 275 - For most of our travelling youth neither improve themselves nor credit their country. This, I believe, is often owing to the strange creatures that are made their governors, but as often to the strange creatures that are to be governed.
Página 272 - ... lord Bathurst's visitors, who inscribed verses upon it. Here is the writing of Addison, Pope, Prior, Congreve, Gay, and (what he esteemed no less) of several fine ladies. I cannot say that the verses answered my expectation from such authors...

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