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by itself, arranged alphabetically, according to the season of ripening, or in any other way, when the Work is completed, or together as issued, at the option of Subscribers. Twelve Numbers will complete a Volume, which will be furnished with a Title

Page and Index. A list of Subscribers will accompany each Volume.

The First Number will be issued on the First OF APRIL, 1847, and

the succeeding numbers every alternate month.

NUMBER I will contain the following varieties of fruits :

BEURRE D'AREMBERG PEAR,
Glout MORCEAU PEAR,
Van Mons LE'ON LE CLERC PEAR,
BALDWIN APPLE.

TERMS OF SUBSORIPTION:

In Royal Octavo, richly colored, at $ 1 per number, payablc on delivery. A limited number of impressions in Imperial quarto, very

highly finished, $2 per number.

Subscribers will please forward their names as early as possible.

BOSTON: PUBLISHED BY C. C. LITTLE AND J. BROWN, 112, WASHINGTON STREET.

HOVEY & CO., 7, MERCHANTS Row.

NEW AND CHOICE VARIETIES OF FRUITS.

HOVEY & Co. CAMBBIDGE NURSERIES, NEAR BOSTON, MASS. RESPECTFULLY invite the attention of amateur cultivators to their immense collection of Fruits, embracing every variety to be obtained in Europe, selections of which were made from the English, Scotch and Continental nurseries, in the autumn of 1844, during a personal visit, and other new and rare kinds, since received from their established correspondents in London, Paris and Brussels. No pains or expense have been spared to render their collection unequalled in the Pomological departmeni, both in extent and variety; and speciinen trees of every kind are planted out, thus affording an opportunity to inspect the fruit as the trees are yearly

coming into bearing. 20,000 Pear irees, on both the quince and pear, are now ready for sale; and, in addition to the established and well known sorts, the following very rare kinds are now offered,-several of them for the first time in the country.

PEARS. Langelier's Beurre.—Raised or introduced to notice by M. Langelier, who first introduced Van Mons Leon le Clerc. He describes it “perfectly melting, ripe in January, larger than the Napoleon, trees very vigorous, and one of the best flavored in cultivation, otherwise it would not be recommended by him." The original trees cost one guinea each, and fine young trees are now offered at $2 each.

JERSEY GRATIOLI.—Described by Mr. Thompson to have a “ melting flesh, like honey, exceedingly rich ; in its decay, not becoming mealy or insipid, but still retains its honied nature: ripe in October." Highly esteemed in Jersey, where it is considered the “finest pear ever met with." Fine trees, $2 each.

Vicoapte DE SPOELBERCH.—Raised by Van Mons, and described by himself as one of his finest seedlings. $ 1 each.

EPISCOPAL.–Raised by M. Bougere, near Lyons: a highly recommended, very late pear: May to June. $ 1 each.

Hill's Fall BUTTER.-Originated in Ohio. Fruit medium size, with a while, highly perfumed, butlery flesh. $1 each.

HULL.–An American seedling of high reputation. Fruit exhibited in 1813. Ripening in September. $1 each.

Locke.—A first rate American pear, ripening in November and December. $1 each. Oliver's Russet.—Another fine American seedling, exhibited in

and pronounced equal in flavor to the Seckel.” Ripe in October. $1 each.

DUNMORE, KNIGHT's MONARCH, Van Mons Leon Le Clerc, Sieulle, STONE, (of Ohio,) &c., with other very new kinds. Trees of various size from $1 to $2 each.

APPLES. BROADWELL.—A very superior sweet apple, large and handsome, keeping till May. 50 cts. each.

ORNE.-A very fine early apple, yellow and excellent, coming in just before the Porter. 50 cts. each.

NORTHERN Spy.-A large and superior apple, keeping till May. 50 cts.

LINCOLN.-A new fruit from Maine, ripe before the Porter ; of medium size, yellow, and of superior quality.' 50 cts.

1843,

GRAPE VINES FOR GRAPERIES.

HOVEY & CO.

OFFER FOR SALE

1000 GRAPE VINES IN POTS, , Raised from eyes, from 2 feet to 4 feet high, and sufficiently strong for planting out the ensuing spring, suitable for Graperies, Greenhouses, &c., comprising the following varieties, true to name : some of them new, rare and valuable. Black Hamburgh

Muscat of Alexandria *Black Hamburgh, Wilmot's (new) *Muscat Blanc Hatif (new and fine) *Black Hamburgh, No. 16, (new *Muscat, Tottenham Park and fine)

*Muscat, Austrian (new) Black Julý, (Early)

Muscadine, Royal Black Prince

*Macready's Early White, (very Chasselas, Red

early and sweet) Chasselas, White

Pitmaston White Cluster Chasselas, Golden

St. Peter's, Black, (keeps well) Esperione

*St. Peter's, West's, (new and fine) Frankendale

Sweet Water Frontignan, White

Syrian (large clusters) Frontignan, Grizzly

White Nice (large clusters) Frontignan, Red

White Malvaise Frontignan, Black

Zinfindal (superior) Lombardy

*Poonah (very large and late.) Prices 75 cents each, or $6 per dozen, except those marked (*), which are $ 1 each.

0 30 other new varieties are under cultivation and will be offered for sale in the fall of 1847. Plants carefully packed for safe transportation to all parts of the country.

HOVEY & CO. Boston, Jan. 1, 1847,

NEW WORK ON THE ROSE.

On the 1st of May, 1847, will be published,

PART 1 OF
THE ROSE GARDEN,
BY WILLIAM PAUL, OF THE ROSE NURSERIES,

Cheshunt, Herts., England. This work will be published in ten or twelve Half-crown monthly parts; each part will contain a colored plate of some new or popular Rose, execute by the most emine artists. The text will also be liberally illustrated by Wood Engravings, to elucidate particular operations necessary to be observed in the cultivation of this popular Flower.

Prospectuses are now ready and may be had from Messrs. Sherwood & Co.,23 Paternoster Row, London, or of Hovey & Co., Boston, U.S. A.

Jan. 1, 1847.

OF

HORTICULTURE.

MARCH, 1847.

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

Art. I. A Leaf from the History of Pomology in the Past.

By T. S. HUMRICKHOUSE, Coshocton, Ohio.

THERE has always been a proneness, in existing generations of mankind, to attribute all knowledge and all science to themselves; and to regard preceding ages as involved in ignorance and darkness, if not barbarism. The truth of this remark applies to no age more than to the present, to no country more than to our own, and to no subject more than to Pomology. Brother Jonathan must amend,-he must reform, or he will, if indeed he has not already, become a proverb.

Why should we arrogate so much to ourselves, when a little research would be sure to lead us to the opposite conclusion?

* In the history of Pomology from the earliest to the present times, the curious antiquary may find a vast field for his researches; and, in the attempt to explore it, will employ himself fully as usefully as in many of his present undertakings.

Without further preface, I take the liberty of transcribing what follows from the “ Memoirs and Correspondence of John Evelyn, edited by William Bray, Esq., London, 1827," pages 435 to 437 inclusive, in the hope that, by publishing it, you will confer a favor upon those of your readers who may not have access to the work :

"In a letter to Mr. Boyle, 230 November, 1664, he,” (Evelyn) "says, one Rhea (qu. Ray?) has published a very useful book concerning the Culture of Flowers, but it does nothing reach my long-since attempted design on that intire VOL. XIII.NO. III.

11

subject, with all its ornaments and circumstances, but God only knows when my opportunities will permit me to bring it to maturity."

"In the Preface to the Acetaria, published in 1699, he mentions a work in which he had spent upwards of forty years, and his collections for which had, in that time, filled several thousand pages. The author of the Biographia Britannica believes that this was the work part of which he had shewed to his friends under the title of Elysium Britannicum,' but which, in that Preface, he calls "The Plan of a Royal Garden,' &c.; and that his Acetaria and Gardener's Kalendar, were parts of it. This is confirmed by the preceding letter to Dr. Boyle.

Among the MSS. at Wotton, there are parts of two volumes with the running title of Elysium Britannicum,' consisting of miscellaneous observations on a great variety of subjects, but not digested, except a printed sheet of the contents of the intended work as follows:

ELYSIUM BRITANNICUM,

IN THREE BOOKS.

Præmissis præmittendis, &c.

Book I. "Chap. 1. A Garden derived and defined, with its distinctions and sorts.-2. Of a Gardiner, and how he is to be qualified.-3. Of the Principles and Elements in generall. 4.-Of the Fire.-5. Of the Air and Winds.-6. Of the Water.—7. Of the Earth.—8. Of the Celestial influences, particularly the Sun and Moon, and of the Climates.-9. Of the four Seasons.-10. Of the Mould and Soil of a Garden.–11. Of Composts and Stercoration.-12. Of the Generation of Plants.

Book II. “Chap. 1. Of the instruments belonging to a Gardiner, and their several uses.-2. Of the situation of a Garden, with its extent.—3. Of fencing, enclosing, plotting, and disposing the Ground.-4. Of a Seminary, and of propagating Trees, Plants, and Flowers.-5. Of Knots, Parterrs, Compartiments, Bordures, and Embossements.-6. Of Walkes, Terraces, Carpets, and Allees, Bowling greens, Maills, their materials and proportions.—7. Of Groves, Lạbyrinths, Dædales, Cabinets,

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