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ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

General Subject. Art. I. A Leaf from the History of Pomology in the Past. By T. S. Humrick house, Coshocton, Ohio,

97 Art. II. Instance of Effect of Boiling Water on Seeds. By X.,

. . 100 Horticulture. Art. III. Additional Remarks on the Northern Spy Apple. By J. H. Watts, Esq., Rochester, N. Y.,

. 104 Art. IV. Some Account of the Cooper Apple and its His. tory. By T. S. Humrickhouse,

105 Art. V. Notice of some New Seedling Fruits of the West,

with a Description and Engraving of the American White
Winter Calville Apple. By A Fahnestock, Lancaster,

Ohio,
Art. VI. Pomological Notices : or Notices respecting New

and superior Fruits, worthy of General Cultivation. No.
ticcs of several new Apples, Peaches, and Grapes. By
the Editor,

112 ART. VII. Remarks and General Hints on Some Few Varieties of the Pear. By S. Walker, Roxbury, Mass.,

. 118 ART. VIII. George the IVth Peach. By W. R. Prince, Flushing, L. I.,

120 Floricullure. Art, IX. Hydrangea Japónica, its Cultivation, with an Engraving of the Plant. By the Editor,

122 Reviews. Art. I. European Agriculture and Rural Economy from Per.

sonal Observation. By Henry Colman. Vol. II. Part
VIII. pp. 223 to 370,

125 ART. II. 1. The Young Gardener's Assistant in three parts. 2.

The Florist's Guide. 3. The Fruit Cultivator's Manual.
4. The Kitchen Gardener's Instructor,

126 Art. II1. Experimental Researches on the Food of Animals, 127 Art. IV. Chemical Essays relating to Agriculture,

· 127 Art. V. The Hasty Pudding ; a Poem in three Cantos, 128 Art. VI. The Rural Register and Almanac for 1847, Art. VII. Proceedings of the National Convention of Farmers, Gardeners, and Silk Culturists, &c.,

129 Art. VIII. The Chemical Principles of the Rotation of Crops,

MISCELLANEOUS INTELLIGENCE. Art. I....Domestic Notices,

130 Art. II..... Massachusetts Horticultural Society,

134 ART. III...Answers to Correspondents,

142 HORTICULTURAL MEMORANDA for March,

143

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SPLENDID NEW WORK ON FRUIT.

THE

FRUITS OF AMERICA,

BY C. M. HOVEY,

EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE OF HORTICULTURE:

CONTAINING RICHLY COLORED ENGRAVINGS,

ACCOMPANIED WITH THE WOOD AND FOLIAGE OF ALL THE CHOICEST

FRUITS CULTIVATED IN THE UNITED STATES.

From Paintings from Nature, made efpressly for this Work,

BY W. SHARP,

CHROMOLITHED AND RETOUCHED UNDER HIS DIRECTION.

THE LETTER PRESS TO CONTAIN A FULL DESCRIPTION OF THE FRUITS, THE HABIT
OF GROWTH OF THE TREES, COLOR OF THE WOOD, AND FORM OF THE
LEAVES : THE SYNONYMS UNDER WHICH EACH VARIETY IS KNOWN,
THE ORIGIN AND PERIOD OF INTRODUCTION, AND ALL OTHER

PARTICULARS OF IMPORTANCE TO THE POMOLOGIST.

Tae increased attention which, within a few years, has been given to Pomology, and the desire to obtain the most correct information in regard to the choicest varieties of Fruit, seem to demand a Work of the character now announced. The recent publications devoted to the subject, as well as the many valuable articles in the Horticultural periodicals of the day, in reference to it,-illustrated as they have been with outline Engravings of Fruits,-have done much to spread a better knowledge of the many varieties which have been brought to notice,-to facilitate the detection of Synonyms,—and to establish a more correct Nomenclature.

at once

But experience has shown, that, to arrive at safe and certain conclusions, a reliance cannot be placed upon outline Engravings, or Descriptions of the fruit alone; and the great errors, which have been the cause of so much disappointment to the ardent Pomologist, might have, in most instances, been prevented, had cultivators made themselves acquainted with the Habit of the Trees,-the Color of the Wood, or the Form of the Leaves. They are, indeed, in some instances, more to be relied upon than single specimens of the fruit alone; and an experienced cultivator can detect, at any season of the year, a great portion of the well known varieties of fruit. These characteristics have been considered, with many, as of secondary importance; but since the rapid multiplication of new sorts, we believe they will be found quite essential to aid in the detection of Synonyms, and the distinction of varieties. But while engravings merely have their value, they do not convey to the Pomologist that general knowledge of fruits which he often wishes to acquire; such as the color or relative beauty of the different varieties; some of the most choice being very

inferior appearance, while others, less excellent, possess a beauty which often renders them worthy a place in every good collection.

of

The Introduction of new Fruits is a subject full of exciting interest to every Pomologist; and the earliest information is eagerly sought in regard to the many varieties which are yearly introduced from abroad, or produced at home. To the Horticultural works of the day, the cultivator will refer for brief accounts of these; but it will be the object of this work to give correct Drawings, and full descriptions of the SELECT FEW, especially those of American origin, as soon as they have been proved to possess qualities which entitle them to general cultivation.

To supply to the Fruit CULTIVATOR this desideratum, will be the object of this work. It will contain richly Colored Illustrations of Fruits, accompanied with the Wood and Leaves, from Paintings made expressly for it, under the direction of the Author; and, with the text, an outline engraving of every variety, accompanied, when important, with sketches of the habit of the trees; leaving nothing which can, in any way, assist the Amateur cultivator, or Nurseryman, in the identification of the numerous varieties, or furnish him with the fullest information in regard to their merits.

The Work will appear in Royal Octavo Numbers, (uniform with Audubon's Birds of America,) and will contain four plates each, with Eight Pages of letter-press, on the finest paper, and in beautiful type ; the Original Paintings executed by that distinguished artist, W. Sharp, chromolithed and retouched under his eye. The text will give all the Synonyms under which each variety is known, its origin, when to be ascertained, its period of introduction, with an accurate description of the Habit of the Tree, Wood, Leaves, Flowers, and Fruit, the Period of Ripening, and all other particulars worthy of note. The whole, with a few exceptions in the early numbers, from Specimen Trees in the extensive collection of the Author, where their comparative merits, in the same soil and locality, can be correctly estimated.

The Plates will not be numbered or paged, but left with a blank No., so that each Class of Fruit may be bound up

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