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ducing double flowers: they are about as large as those of a double anemone, but the petals are arranged with the irregularity of the rose; they are of a pale delicate pink, and remain expanded some days.” It was found by Mr. Fortune, in Shanghai, and was sent home as a double convolvulus. It is a fine addition to our climbing plants, and as it grows readily in any good soil, it would undoubtedly form a splendid object turned out into the open border in summer, in the same way as we have recommended for Ipomæà Lèarii. It flowers freely. (Bot. Reg. Aug.)

5. GARDENIA FLO'RIDA VAR. FORTUNIA NA Mr. Fortune's Gar

denia, (Cinchonaceæ.) A green-house plant ; growing two feet high : with white flowers ; appearing in summer ; a native of China ; increased by cuttings ; grown in leaf mould and peat. Bot. Reg. 1846 p. 43.

One of the most magnificent things which has recently been introduced, ranking on a level with the double white camellia, which it equals in the beauty of the flowers and leaves, and infinitely excels it in its delicious odor.” It is thus spoken of in the Journal of the Hort. Soc. :—"The common single and double varieties of this plant are known to any one.

That which is now noticed differs merely in the extraordinary size of the flowers, which are nearly four inches in diameter, and in having fine broad leaves, sometimes as much as six inches long. The flowers are pure white, changing to light buff as they go off, and not unlike a very large double camellia. Their calyx has the long broad lobes of the original species, instead of the narrow lobes, at least twice as short as the tube of the corolla of G. ràdicans, by which that species is technically known.” Such a description should induce every cultivator to possess what has so long been wanted—a white camellia with a delicious perfume. It comes from the North of China, where it was found by Mr. Fortune, and although nothing is said of its treatment, it is probably as hardy as the camellia. It is a noble acquisition. (Bot. Reg. Aug.) 6. ÆschyNA’NTHUS Boschia`NUS Pax. Vanden Bosch's Æschy

nanthus. (Gesnerdcec.) A stove plant ; growing two feet high ; with scarlet flowers ; appearing in spring : a native of Java :

: Increased by cuttings : grown in moss, peat and leaf mould. Pax Mag. Bot. xiij, p. 175.

All the Æschynanthuses are handsome plants, but the present species is peculiarly so from its abundant blooming, pretty

trailing habit and brilliant flowers. " It will grow freely, rather too much so, as will most of its family if planted in ordinary soil, and kept in the stove, or even in the green-house; but to flower it well it requires to be kept dry in the winter, and brought into a higher temperature: after the blosoms have begun to develop themselves, they will flourish well in the green-house. It is a fine species and worthy of introduction. (Pax Mag. Sept.) 7. Li’LIUM SANGUI'NEUM Lindl. Blood Red Lily (Liliàceæ.)

A hardy bulbous plant : growing eighteen inches high : with dark red flowers : appearing in June : a native of Japan : increased by offsets : grown in loam and leaf mould or peat. Bot. Reg. 1846, p. 50.

This lily is said to be one of the discoveries of Siebold, who introduced the superb lancifoliums, in his Japan expedition. In general appearance, it comes near to our L. philadēlphicum, having an upright and quite dwarf habit, attaining only the height of twelve or eighteen inches, and terminated with " its large solitary orange red flower." It has proved perfectly hardy in the garden of the Horticultural Society--and no doubt it will prove as hardy with us as the L. japonicum or exímium. It is readily propagated by offsets, thriving well in light loam and peat with a little well decomposed manure. Mr. Groom, who presented the bulbs to the Horticultural Society, has succeeded in raising several hybrids between this and other species, some of which are very handsome. We shall have several of them in flower the coming spring, when we shall endeavor to give a full account of them. (Bot. Reg. Sept.)

MISCELLANEOUS INTELLIGENCE.

Art. I. Retrospective Criticism. Modesty.—Mr. Editor: I have been informed, either directly or by some indirect way, through the Horticulturist, that one object of starting that work in opposition to Hovey's Magazine was, that the latter was too much given to extolling the Editor's own wares. I have just spent a few leisure moments in looking over the first five or six numbers of Downing's new magazine, and find (omitting reviews) seventeen instances where he has referred to or named “our work on Fruits and Fruit Trees," and twenty

instances where he has referred to all other works ; this does not include nearly as many more instances where correspondents have referred to your book on fruits,” and where he has selected notices of “Mr. Down. ing's work on fruits.” Nor do I mean to include several references he makes to "our book on Landscape Gardening and Coltage Residences.

Another Specimen.—It is well known that Professor Lindley, fifteen years ago, controverted with great ability the theory of Mr. Knight, that varieties would run out by old age. The same position was taken by Mr. Prince, Mr. Floy, and others. Last of all, Mr. Downing also assumed the same ground in his work on fruits. Now he says that he is much gratified to see Dr. Lindley, “the highest authority in Europe,” come out lately and “ endorse our views"'!! See No. 4, p. 181.-Respectfully yours, Veto. Rochester, N. Y. Dec. 1846.-[Comment would be superfluous.—Ed.)

VAN ZANDT'S SUPERB PEACH. I can't waste time on any anonymous remarks like the one signed P. B. in your December number, and I think you do wrong to admit such without signature, as it deprives your readers of a full knowledge of their intent and disinterestedness. To solve the ques. tion whether the nurseryman who wrote that article actually possesses the “ Van Zandt's Superb Peach,” which, I perceive, is inserted in his Catalogue, and if others have it, I now offer a premium of $ 10 for a single genuine fruit, to be exhibited to the Long Island Horticultural Society, the ensuing summer, by any one of the nurserymen who have inserted it in their Catalogues, the fruit to be grown by the Exhibitor. You will find that I am perfectly au fait in this matter, as will hereafter be proven. If they are inadvertently propagating a wrong variety, it is for the Interest of all it should be corrected. I did not intend my remarks to apply to private gardens.-Wm. R. Prince, Prince's Nurseries, Flushing, Dec. 24, 1846.

ART. II. Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Saturday, Dec. 5th, 1846.-An adjourned meeting of the Society was held to-day,—the President in the chair.

The Executive Committee reported that the sum of $1,350 should be appropriated for premiums for the year 1847, and that the income from the Appleton, Lowell and Lyman funds constitute a part of the appropriation.

A Committee of three was appointed to make the annual settlement with the Mt. Auburn Cemetery.

Adjourned three weeks, to December 23d.

Exhibited.–Fruit: From the President of the Society, Chaumontel, Beurré d Aremberg and Columbia, pears : also three Apples received from some unknown source—one the Cathead and the other, Fall Harvey. From Wm. Stearns, Lawrence, Winter Nelis, Bishop's Thumb, Glout Morceau, Wilkinson, St. Germain, Marsh (native) and Bleeker's Meadow, some of them very fine. From S. Downer, Passe Colmar pears. From Josiah

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Lovett, Winter Nelis and Beurré Diel pears, both fine : also Minister apples. From S. W. Cole, Cranberry apples. William Thomas exhibited a variety of apples raised in Ohio, among the number the Yellow Belleflower, R. I. Greening, Cannahan's Favorite, Yellow Newtown pippin, Gloria Mun. di (weighing 14 lbs.) Winesap, &c., all of large size.

Dec. 26th.—An adjourned meeting of the Society was held to-day-the President in the chair.

Agreeably to the by-laws, the Flower, Fruit and Vegetable Committees made their reports, awarding premiums for the past year, which were accepted and voted to be published in the Transactions of the Society. The following are the Reports : REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FLOWERS.

AWARDING PREMIUMS FOR 1846.
HYACINTHS.-For the best display of 20 kinds, to Joseph Breck &
Co., .

$5 00 For the second best display, to R. M. Copeland,

4 00 TULIPS.—For the best 30 varieties, to Joseph Breck & Co.,

8 00 For the second best, to S. Walker,

6 00 For the third best, to W. Quant,

4 00 Pansies. For the best 12 varieties, to Hovey & Co.,

3 00 Green House Plants in Pots.-June 10th. GERANIUMS.–For the best 6 varieties, to W. Quant,

6 00 For the second best, to William Doyle,

4 00 CALCEOLARIAS. -For the best 4 varieties, to William Quant,

3 00 Cactus.-For the best 6 varieties, to Hovey & Co.,

3 00 For the second best, to William Doyle,

2 00 Fuchsias. For the best 6 varieties, to W. Quant,

6 00 For the second best, to Hovey & Co.,

4 00 Various SoRts.-For the best display, 12 pots, to Hovey & Co., 8 00 For the second best, to William Doyle,

5 00 HAWTHORNS.-For the best display, to Messrs. Winships,

3 00 For the second best, to Hovey & Co.,

2 00 HARDY AZALEAs. For the best display, to D. Haggerston,

3 00 For the second best, to Messrs. Winships,

2 00 SHRUBBY PEONIE8.–For the best display, to Joseph Breck & Co., 3 00 HERBACEOUS PEONIES. -For the best 12 flowers, to J. S. Cabot, 5 00 For the second best, to Breck & Co.,

3 00 For the best display, to W. Mellar,

3 00 Pinks.--For the best 6 varieties, to William Mellar,

4 00 For the second best, to Breck & Co.,

3 00 For the best display, to William Mellar,

3 00 RANUNCULUS.–For the best display, to S. Walker,

5 00 For the second best, to Breck & Co., .

3 00 ANEMONES.--For the best display, to Breck & Co.,

5 00 For the second best, to Hovey & Co.,

3 00 2. 00

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Division A.-Class 1. HARDY Roses. For the best 30 varieties, to Hovey & Co., .$8 00 For the second best 30 varieties, to Breck & Co.,

6 00 For the third best 30 varieties, no claimant. For the best display, to Messrs. Hovey & Co.,

3 00 Class II.-For the best 12 varieties, to D. Crowley,

5 00 No competitor in this class.

Division B.---Class 1.
For the best display of Noisette, China Tea, &c. No flowers

offered. Class II.--Hardy PERPETUALS.-Best 6 varieties, to Hovey & Co. 4 00 For the second best 6 varieties, to Breck & Co.,

3 00 HOLLYHOCKY.-For the best display, to D. Crowley,

3 00 No other competitor. MAGNOLIAS.- For the best display, to J. Kenrick,

3 00 For the second best display, to W. E. Carter,

2 00 CARNATION AND Picotee PINKS.-For the best 8 varieties, to J. L. L. F. Warren,

5 00 For the second best variety, to Breck & Co.,

4 00 For the best display, to William Mellar,

3 00 HARDY RHODODENDRONS.—Best display: none offered

Second best display: none offered.
Phloxes. For the best 10 varieties, to J. S. Cabot,

5 00 For the second best variety, to S. Walker,

4 00 For the third best variety, to Breck & Co.,

3 00 BALSAMS.–For the best display, to W. Quant,

3 00 For the second best display, to J. L. L. F. Warren,

2 00 For the third best display, to Walker & Co.,

1 00 GERMAN Asters.–For the best display, to William Quant,

4 00 For the second best display, to Hovey & Co.,

3 00 For the third best display, to J. W. Mandel,

2 00 INDIGENOUS PLANTS.–For the best display, to G. Gilbert,

3 00 HERBACEOUS PerenniALS.–For the best display, to J. Breck & Co., 6 00 For the second best display, to Messrs. Winships,

4 00 For the third best display, to P. Barnes,

3 00 ANNUALS.–For the best display, to Breck & Co.,

5 00 For the second best display, to Parker Barnes,

4 00 For the third best display, to Walker & Co.,

3 00 Division A. DAHLIAS.—Premier Prize. For the best 12 dissimilar blooms, to W. Quant,

8 00

4 00 Specimen bloom, to William Quant,

6 00 Specimen blooms, 6 varieties, to William Quant, Specimen blooms, 2 varieties, to William Mellar,

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