Discussions on Philosophy and Literature, Education and University Reform: Chiefly from the Edinburgh Review

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Longman, Brown, Green and Longman's, 1853 - 852 páginas
 

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Página 4 - Pictorial History of England. Being a History of the People as well as a History of the Kingdom, down to the Reign of George III.
Página 22 - Thought cannot transcend consciousness ; consciousness is only possible under the antithesis of a subject and object of thought, known only in correlation, and mutually limiting each other ; while, independently of this, all that we know either of subject or object, either of mind or matter, is only a knowledge in each of the particular, of the plural, of the different, of the modified, of the phenomenal.
Página xxxiii - The intense view of these manifold contradictions and imperfections in human reason has so wrought upon me, and heated my brain, that I am ready to reject all belief and reasoning, and can look upon no opinion even as more probable or likely than another.
Página 3 - To which are added a Synopsis of Words differently Pronounced by different Orthoepists ; and Walker's Key to the Classical Pronunciation of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names.
Página 21 - For, as the greyhound cannot outstrip his shadow, nor (by a more appropriate simile) the eagle outsoar the atmosphere in which he floats, and by which alone he may be supported ; so the mind cannot transcend that sphere of limitation, within and through which exclusively the possibility of thought is realized.
Página 528 - An instructed and intelligent people, besides, are always more decent and orderly than an ignorant and stupid one. They feel themselves, each individually, more respectable, and more likely to obtain the respect of their lawful superiors, and they are therefore more disposed to respect those superiors. They are more disposed to examine, and more capable of seeing through, the interested complaints of faction and sedition...
Página xxiv - The vanity of man, and his insatiable longing after existence, have led him also to dream of a life after death. A being full of contradictions, he is the most wretched of creatures ; since the other creatures have no wants transcending the bounds of their nature. Man is full of desires and wants that reach to infinity, and can never be satisfied. His nature is a lie, uniting the greatest poverty with the greatest pride. Among these so great evils, the best thing God has bestowed on man is the power...

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