The History of England from the Accession of James II.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - stanleykaye - LibraryThing

I picked up this book with some trepidation. I have heard this book mentioned many times always in the context of criticizing so called "Whig Historians" of which Macaulay was one of the most ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - jburlinson - LibraryThing

One of the great achievements of historiography and of English prose. Macaulay had wanted to chronicle English history up to his own epoch, or at least until the reign of George III, in order to ... Leer comentario completo

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Página 151 - The Puritan hated bear-baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators.
Página 561 - The LORD God of gods, the LORD God of gods, he knoweth, and Israel he shall know ; if it be in rebellion, or if in transgression against the LORD, (save us not this day...
Página 272 - The country rings around with loud alarms, And raw in fields the rude militia swarms; Mouths without hands; maintained at vast expense, In peace a charge, in war a weak defence ; Stout once a month they march, a blustering band, And ever, but in times of need, at hand...
Página 302 - ... reason, drawn from Scripture or ecclesiastical history, for adhering to her doctrines, her ritual, and her polity; nor were they, as a class, by any means strict observers of that code of morality which is common to all Christian sects. But the experience of many ages proves that men may be ready to fight to the death, and to persecute without pity, for a religion whose creed they do not understand, and whose precepts they habitually disobey...
Página 581 - Paul's, with genius and virtue, with public veneration and with imperishable renown ; not, as in our humblest churches and churchyards, with everything that is most endearing in social and domestic charities; but with whatever is darkest in human nature and in human destiny, with the savage triumph...
Página 349 - One chief cause of the badness of the roads seems to have been the defective state of the law. Every parish was bound to repair the highways which passed through it. The peasantry were forced to give their gratuitous labour six days in the year.
Página 51 - What Henry and his~ favourite counsellors meant, at one time, by the supremacy, was certainly nothing less than the whole power of the keys. The King was to be the Pope of his kingdom, the vicar of God, the expositor of Catholic verity, the channel of sacramental graces. He arrogated to ' himself the right of deciding dogmatically what was orthodox doctrine...
Página 144 - The Royalists themselves confessed that, in every department of honest industry, the discarded warriors prospered beyond other men, that none was charged with any theft or robbery, that none was heard to ask an alms, and that if a baker, a mason, or a wagoner attracted notice by his diligence and sobriety, he was in all probability one of Oliver's old soldiers.
Página 1 - Scotland, after ages of enmity, was at length united to England, not merely by legal bonds, but by indissoluble ties of interest and affection ; how, in America, the British colonies rapidly became far mightier and wealthier than the realms which Cortes and Pizarro had added to the dominions of Charles the Fifth ; how, in Asia, British adventurers founded an empire not less splendid and more durable than that of Alexander.
Página 197 - Few things in our history are more curious than the origin and growth of the power now possessed by the Cabinet. From an early period the Kings of England had been assisted by a Privy Council to which the law assigned many important functions and duties. During several centuries this body deliberated on the gravest and most delicate affairs. But by degrees its character changed. It became too large for despatch and secrecy. The rank of Privy Councillor was often bestowed as an honorary distinction...

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