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THOMAS DICK:

PAGE WALTER SAVAGE LAYDOR :

PAGE

On Covetousness..

581

The English Commonwealth..

625

On Benevolence..

582 The Power of a Word..

626

Shakspeare, Milton .............

626

SAMUEL ROGERS:

Biographical Sketch..

683 HENRY HART MILMAN:

Early Recollections,

585

Biographical Sketch...........

627

Historic Associations

586 Jerusalem before the Siege...

628

Power of Memory..

588

The Firmness of Faith...

628

Human Life...

589 The Nativity ......

630

Pæstum..

591 The Burial Anthem...

631

Ginevra

592

A Wish..

593 GEORGE CROLY:

Biographical Sketch...

632

JAMES MONTGOMERY:

Condorcet...

Biographical Sketch.........

593

Progress of Civilization

634

The Love of Country and of Ilome...... 596 The Dead Sea ....

Home Dear to the African........

596 Bellator Moriens......

635

Night...

597 The Alhambra....

Aspirations of Youth

598

Evening.........

636

The Common Lot.....

599 Jacob's Dream

636

Prayer......

600

Friend after Friend Departs..

600 THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY:

Superiority of Poetry over Sculpture Biographical Sketch.......... ............... 637

and Painting.

Milton ......

638

Humility........

601 The Puritans......

643

Characteristics of Prose and Verse...... 603 Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress............ 641

The Permanence of Words....

605

The Crowning of Petrarch....

647

Books and Education in Charles Se

JOHN WILSON:

cond's Reign......

647

Biographical Sketch.

C06

The Head-stone

607 ALFRED TENNYSON:

A Morning Picture.......

610 Biographical Sketch.......

649

The Midnight Ocean ....

612 Lady Clara Vere de Vere.......

650

To the Memory of Grahame.....

612 The Lord of Burleigh.....

661

The Evening Cloud--a Sonnet..

613 The Bugle Song

653

Circumstance..

653

AMELIA OPIE:

Extracts from “In Memoriam"

654

Biographical Sketch..

614

The Orphan Boy's Tale.......

615 MRS. NORTON:

Song--Forget me not...

616

Biographical Sketch.....

656

Hymn

616 To the Duchess of Sutherland.............. 656

War....

616 The Arab's Farewell to his Steed ......... 658

Lies Falsely called Lies of Benevo-

A Mother.........

659

lence...

617 Sonnet-To my Books......

660

601

706

....... 711

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LORD BROUGHAM:
Biographical Sketch......

769
The Duke of Wellington-The School.

WILLIAM HOWITT:

Sketch of .....

753

The Mission of Christ.....

753

Politics Inseparable from Christianity.. 755

The Bible the Fountain of all Reforms.. 756

The True Dignity of Labor....... 757

master ...

Man over Men He made not Lord ....... 773

Happy Effects of Education........... 774

Railroads rersus War

775

Aptitude of Youth for Knowledge....... 776

Prospects of the Age-Sneerers at Edu-

cation.....

The Schoolmaster and the Conqueror... 778

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Is entering upon the subject of English Literature of the present century, it is gratifying to begin with the name of one who, to the character of a pleasing poet, a profound scholar, a tasteful and judicious critic, and a successful and venerated school-master, unites that of a pure Christian, in so eminent a degree as Joseph Warton. He was the son of the Rev. Thomas Warton, Professor of Poetry in Oxford University, and was born at Dunsfold, in the county of Surrey, in April, 1722. He was educated by his father until he was fourteen, when he entered Winchester school; and while there, so distinguished himself for his poetical talents, that he became a contributor to the poetry of the “Gentleman's Magazine." In 1740, he removed to Oxford University. How he spent his time there may be learned from the following interesting portion of a letter to his

father, upon

LONGINUS.

To help me in some parts of my last collections from Longinus, I have read a good part of Dionysius Halicarnassus : so that I think by this time I ought fully to understand the structure of words and sentences. I shall read Longinus as long as I live: it is impossible not to catch fire and raptures from his glowing style. The noble causes he gives, at the conclusion, for the decay of the

21:

In 1744, he took his degree of A. B., was immediately ordained, and officiated as his father's curate in the church of Basingstoke, in Hampshire, till February, 1746. In this year, he published a small volume of “Odes on Various Subjects.” They are seventeen in number, and, though decidedly inferior to those of Collins, published the same year, they are characterized by a fine taste and fancy, and much ease of versification. The odes “To Liberty," “ To Content,” and “To Fancy" are the best. “The latter abounds,” says Dr. Drake, “in a succession of strongly contrasted and high-wrought imagery, clothed in a versification of the sweetest cadence and most brilliant polish."!

The year after the publication of this volume of odes, he obtained the rectory of Wyoslade, and thereupon married a Miss Daman, to whom he had been long engaged. With her he enjoyed the highest domestic happiness, and devoted all his leisure hours to the translation of Virgil's Eclogues and Georgics, which were to be accompanied by Pitt's version of the Æneid, and the original Latin of the whole. In 1753, this elegant and valuable accession to classical literature was completed and published, accompanied by notes, dissertations, commentaries, and essays. The work was well received, and Warton's version of the Georgies and Eclogues was pronounced far superior to any that had preceded it. “To every classical reader, indeed,” remarks Mr. Wooll, “Warton's Virgil will afford the richest fund of instruction and amusement; and as a professional man I hesitate not to declare, that I scarcely know a work to the upper classes of schools so pregnant with the most valuable advantages; as it imparts information, without the encouragement of idleness, and crowns the exertions of necessary and laudable industry with the acquisition of a pure and unadulterated taste."

It was at this time that Dr. Johnson, in a letter dated March 8, 1753, applied to him, from Hawkesworth, to assist in the “Adventurer:” “ Being desired," says he, "to look out for another hand, my thoughts necessarily fixed upon you, whose fund of literature will enable you to assist them, with very little interruption of your studies, &c. : the province of criticism and literature they are very desirous to assign to the commentator on Virgil."3 His first paper is No. 49, dated April 24, 1753, containing a “ Parallel between Ancient and Modern Learning." His communications are among the very best of the whole work, and are written "with an extent of erudition, and a purity, elegance, and vigor of language, which demand very high praise."4

In the year 1755, Warton was chosen second master of Winchester school, for which high office he was peculiarly qualified by his talents and character, as he united to his great learning a peculiar aptness to impart instruction, and the rare art of exciting in his scholars an enthusiasm for literature, and a love and respect

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