A letter ... on the system of war and peace complements in her majesty's ships

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Página 18 - The Church hath power to decree Rites and Ceremonies, and authority in Controversies of Faith...
Página 5 - ... reasonable to expect a rich crop from a barren soil, as that strong and healthy children should be born of parents whose constitutions have been worn out with intemperance or disease,* " What a dreadful inheritance is the gout, the scurvy, or the King's evil, to transmit to our offspring ! how happy had it been for the heir of many a great estate, had he been born a beggar, rather than to inherit his father's fortunes 28 fortunes at the expense of inheriting his diseases S . i " A person labouring...
Página 21 - Besides this, he was not at all satisfied to give his unfeigned " assent and consent to all and every thing contained in the book of Common Prayer,
Página 12 - ... second class boys, when old enough, should be advanced to the first class whenever vacancies occur. The system of first class boys has answered well so far as it has gone, and boys thus brought up prefer the comfort and cleanliness of a man-of-war to the discomforts of the merchant service. There is an absurd regulation now existing, by which from 300 to 400 of the very best men are annually lost to the service. You will not allow men who receive a pension for twenty-one years' good service to...
Página 9 - It does not attach, in so great a degree, to three-deckers and large ships of the line, although with them the system is radically wrong and manifestly absurd. Men will not enter for ships having masts and yards, anchors and cables, nearly the size of a ship of the line, to be worked by the reduced complement of a small frigate. Men will not go where 275, a large proportion boys, are required to do the work of 350 ; where all hands have to be called when the watch alone ought to be able to perform...
Página 14 - American war arose mainly from our ships being under-manned. We then held our opponents too cheap; with an overwhelming fleet, we permitted them to beat us in detail, and threw away our advantage by meeting them single-handed in weak-manned ships. If we are to have a Navy, which the world may respect, now is the time to make it perfect. Now is the time to give that conscious superiority to officers and men which will carry them through in the hour of trial. Other nations are doing their utmost to...
Página 11 - ... forced to do so against their inclinations, and the men take a disgust to the service. How are these evils to be remedied ? Complete your ships to what is called their war or proper complement ; revise those complements ; see that you have sufficient men in every ship of every class, to fight and to work her under every possible emergency ; make the work properly light; and you will remove the dislike of the service by removing the cause.
Página 13 - ... future dominion of the sea. A peace and war establishment has been the invariable practice of the service. The mere practice is no proof that it is good. But circumstances are changed — the long peace has enabled other powers not only to improve their systems but to practise their seamen. The Ame• Most of the men who are at present kept out of the service by this regulation are only thirty-nine years old...
Página 15 - But circumstances are changed — the long peace has enabled other powers not only to improve their systems but to practise their seamen. The American navy, which has proved itself already a most formidable opponent, is not of long standing.* Their ships are fully manned (perhaps overdone). They fancy themselves superior, they have at least the confidence derived from numerical strength. Our men fancy themselves (are really so) numerically weak — they want that confidence. You cannot prevent the...
Página 17 - ... rendezvous were sent as able seamen and entered in that ship's books accordingly. Out of the whole number that put forward their claims to that rating (bar the petty officers) there were not seven men that could take the lead, and barely twice that number that could be well trusted at the wheel. One man who had never been at sea, except as a marine, was sent on board with the rating of AB — so that it is quite impossible to come to any conclusion as to the number of able seamen now and in former...

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