Hamlet by William Shake-speare, 1603; Hamlet by William Shakespeare, 1604: being exact reprints of the first and second editions, with a bibliographical preface by S. Timmins

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Hamlet is the master piece of Shakespere ,which I Enjoyed heartfully.
''TO BE NOT TO BE ''is the Soliloqui which Gives a fantastic Messege to all the Educated Folk.
I Love it and Read it Several Times, where I get Peace.
Mohd.Azam
DEO Rtd
Karimnager
TELANGANA.
INDIA

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Página 71 - ... and my blood, And let all sleep, while to my shame I see The imminent death of twenty thousand men, That for a fantasy and trick of fame Go to their graves like beds, fight for a plot Whereon the numbers cannot try the cause, Which is not tomb enough and continent To hide the slain ? O, from this time forth, My thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth ! \Exit.
Página 47 - I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue : but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently : for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness.
Página 70 - We go to gain a little patch of ground That hath in it no profit but the name.
Página 36 - And indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame the earth seems to me a sterile promontory. This most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire - why, it appeareth nothing to me but a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.
Página 88 - Imperious Caesar, dead and turn'd to clay, Might stop a hole to keep the wind 'away: O, that that earth which kept the world in awe Should patch a wall to expel the winter's flaw!— But soft!
Página 18 - That for some vicious mole of nature in them, As, in their birth, — wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin, — By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason, Or by some habit that too much o'er-leavens The form of plausive manners; that these men, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect...
Página 28 - He took me by the wrist and held me hard ; Then goes he to the length of all his arm, And with his other hand thus o'er his brow, He falls to such perusal of my face As he would draw it.
Página 59 - Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults To give in evidence. What then? what rests? Try what repentance can: what can it not? Yet what can it, when one can not repent? O wretched state! O bosom black as death! O limed soul, that struggling to be free Art more engaged! Help, angels! make assay; Bow, stubborn knees; and heart with strings of steel Be soft as sinews of the new-born babe. All may be well.
Página 72 - ild you! They say the owl was a baker's daughter. Lord! we know what we are, but know not what we may be.
Página 10 - Maury's book will not hereafter be classed with the works of the great men who have taken the lead in extending and improving knowledge and art ; his book displays in a remarkable degree, like the ' Advancement of Learning,' and the ' Natural History* of Buffon, profound research and magnificent imagination.

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