The Miscellaneous Writings of Lord Macaulay

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Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts & Green, 1865 - 395 páginas
 

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Página 365 - And he — he turns, he flies: — shame on those cruel eyes That bore to look on torture, and dare not look on war...
Página 129 - ... historian would reclaim those materials which the novelist has appropriated. The history of the government, and the history of the people, would be exhibited in that mode in which alone they can be exhibited justly, in inseparable conjunction and intermixture. We should not then have to look for the wars and votes of the Puritans in Clarendon, and for their phraseology in Old Mortality; for one half of King James in Hume, and for the other half in the Fortunes of Nigel.
Página 23 - Fairest of stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn, Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere, While day arises, that sweet hour of prime.
Página 199 - When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him.
Página 364 - When a murmuring sound broke out, and swelled into a shout Among the godless horsemen upon the tyrant's right. And hark ! like the roar of the billows on the shore, The cry of battle rises along their charging line : For God ! for the Cause ! for the Church ! for the Laws ! For Charles, King of England, and Rupert of the Rhine!
Página 310 - Hervey," said the old philosopher many years later, " was a vicious man; but he was very kind to me. If you call a dog Hervey, I shall love him.
Página 89 - Partridge gave that credit to Mr. Garrick, which he had denied to Jones, and fell into so violent a trembling, that his knees knocked against each other. Jones asked him what was the matter, and whether he was afraid of the warrior upon the stage?
Página 379 - Scargill's whispering trees, and pined by Arno for my lovelier Tees; beheld each night my home in fevered sleep, each morning started from the dream to weep ; till God, who saw me tried too sorely, gave the resting-place I asked, an early grave.
Página 106 - ... all this is very easy. But to be a really great historian is perhaps the rarest of intellectual distinctions. Many Scientific works are, in their kind, absolutely perfect. There are Poems which We should be inclined to designate as faultless, or as disfigured only by blemishes which pass unnoticed in the general blaze of excellence. There are Speeches, some speeches of Demosthenes particularly, in which it would be impossible to alter a word, without altering it for the worse.
Página 299 - Baldearg O'Donnell and galloping Hogan, and about the exploits of Peterborough and Stanhope, the surprise of Monjuich, and the glorious disaster of Brihuega. This man must have been of the Protestant religion ; but he was of the aboriginal race, and not only spoke the Irish language, but could pour forth unpremeditated Irish verses.

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