Expeditions of Discovery in South Australia

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1843 - 38 páginas
 

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Página 165 - SW was seen a low range, flat at the top, and gradually declining to the level of and merging into the sandy country before us; whilst to the NW and extending to the N. as far as the eye could reach, was to be seen a very broad glittering strip of what seemed to be water but which I am inclined to think was not water, but only the dry and glazed bed of where water had lodged and of very great extent. "Nowhere could we see the least sign of grass or water; the hills before me were high, barren and...
Página 180 - ... surface water, neither were there creeks or water-courses of any description. The only supply of water procured by the party through this dreary waste was obtained by digging in the drifts of pure white sand found along the coast at places where the great fossil bank receded a little from the immediate margin of the sea. The supply thus obtained was very precarious ; and, during the progress of our journey, we crossed over, at various times, intervals of sixty, one hundred and thirty-six, and...
Página 181 - The first of these occurs immediately east of Cape Arid ; but it is very small, and separated from the sea by a bar of sand. Others, as we advanced further to the westward, were of a more considerable size, and bore the appearance of being connected with the sea. These might possibly afford secure harbours for boats, but the circumstances under which I was travelling did not admit of my delaying to examine them; and, for the convenience of crossing, I usually kept so far inland as to intercept them...
Página 168 - It was evident that what I had taken on my last journey to be the bed of a dry lake, now contained water and was of considerable size : but as my time was very limited, and the lake at a considerable distance, I had to forego my wish to visit it. I have, however, no doubt of its being salt from the nature of the country and the fact of finding the water very salt in one of the creeks draining into it from the hills. Beyond this lake (which I distinguished with the name of Colonel Torrens) to the...
Página 179 - ... paying every courtesy to the artists who had come forth so nobly in the work of benevolence, and to their supporters. Spring, Jem Burns, Bendigo, Frank Redmond, and others were actively employed in seeing the arrangements carried out; and I am happy to have it in my power to record the fact that not one single disturbance took place within the walls. The utmost harmony and good feeling prevailed throughout the evening ; and this
Página 172 - ... reach the edge of the water, which appears to exist at a distance of some miles from the outer margin. On one occasion only was I able to taste of its waters ; in a small arm of the lake near the most north-westerly part of it, which I visited, and here the water was as salt as the sea. The lake...
Página 181 - ... river, we met, for the first time, with stunted trees of the kind called the mahogany ; but it was not until we had passed some miles to the westward of Cape Riche that we saw any large trees, or got into a country that could properly be called a timber one. Here the mahogany, red gum...
Página 177 - I proceeded myself, accompanied by one of the elder boys, but •without horses, to make a second attempt for their recovery ; this I effected, and on the fourth day rejoined my party at the water. Our horses were now reduced in number to five, and the whole were so thoroughly jaded and worn out, that it was evident we could not attempt to move from our present position for some time to come, especially as we had the gloomy prospect of a vast extent of country before us in which there was not the...
Página 181 - ... seldom succeeded in finding any grass. " Passing behind Lucky Bay to the lagoons W. of Esperance Bay, I traversed a considerable extent of grassy land, consisting principally of sandy undulations, but with many patches of rich soil in the flats and valleys. Water appeared to be abundant ; but there was still a total absence of all timber but the tea-tree. From the salt lagoons we crossed over a very barren country, and had much difficulty in procuring any grass for our horses. The water is generally...
Página 180 - ... this cause we lost many valuable animals ; and our progress was impeded by the frequent and long delays necessary to recruit those that were still left alive. Our journey thus became protracted to a period far beyond what had been calculated upon ; and it became imperative, not merely to economise the provisions we had brought with us, but, eventually, to destroy two of our horses as an additional supply of food to the party. In the midst of these difficulties, and then barely half-way across...

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