The Industrial Arts of India, Volumen1

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Chapman and Hall, 1880 - 176 páginas
 

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Página 134 - Europe to understand what things may be done by machinery, and what must be done by hand-work, if art is of the slightest consideration in the matter. But if, owing to the operation of certain economic causes, machinery were to be gradually introduced into India for the manufacture of its great traditional handicrafts, there would ensue an industrial revolution which, if not directed...
Página 127 - Which shall be thine when the pile flames for me — Feeds all its mouths and keeps the King's chest filled. Fair is the season with new leaves, bright blooms, Green grass, and cries of plough-time." So they rode Into a land of wells and gardens, where, All up and down the rich red loam, the steers Strained their strong shoulders in the creaking yoke Dragging the ploughs ; the fat soil rose and rolled In smooth...
Página 135 - ... tinkling ornaments for the feet, taking his designs from the fruits and flowers around him, or from the traditional forms represented in the paintings and carvings of the great temple, which rises over the grove of mangoes and palms at the end of the street above the lotuscovered village tank. At half-past three or four in the afternoon, the whole street is lighted up by the moving robes of the women going down to draw water from the tank, each with two or three water jars on her head : and so...
Página 142 - ... master-workmen who have a salary and daily rations for their lives, and are provided with all the materials for their work. They receive a present and an increase of salary for every fine work they produce. Their appointments were hereditary. This was formerly, and is now also, the case in India. In the Indian Museum collection of jade there is a large engraved bowl, on which a family of lapidaries, in the employ of the emperors of Delhi, was engaged for three generations. It is only in this...
Página 136 - ... colossal mills of Bombay, to drudge in gangs for tempting wages, at manufacturing piece goods, in competition with Manchester, in the production of which they are no more intellectually and morally concerned than the grinder of a barrel organ in the tunes turned out from it.
Página 140 - ... the slightest infringement of which is punished by severe fines, which are the chief source of their income. But the object of these rules is to give the weak and unfortunate the same chance in life as others more favoured by nature. These rules naturally follow from the theocratic conceptions which have governed the whole organisation of social life in India, and it is incontrovertible that the unrestricted development of the competitive impulse in European life, particularly in the pursuit...

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