The Farmer's Magazine

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Página 361 - Throws out the snowdrop and the crocus first ; The daisy, primrose, violet darkly blue, And polyanthus of...
Página 110 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Página 150 - Hereditaments rated thereunto; that is to say, of the Rent at which the same might reasonably be expected to let from year to year, free of all usual Tenant's Rates and Taxes, and Tithe Commutation Rent-charge, if any, and deducting therefrom the probable average annual cost of the repairs, insurance, and other expenses, if any, necessary to maintain them in a state to command such Rent...
Página 150 - ... the rent at which the same might reasonably be expected to let from year to year, free of all usual tenant's rates and taxes, and tithe commutation rent-charge, if any, and deducting therefrom the probable average annual cost of the repairs, insurance, and other expenses, if any, necessary to maintain them in a state to command such rent...
Página 195 - ... of their produce as food, the constitution of soils, the manner in which lands are enriched by manure, or rendered fertile by the different processes of cultivation.
Página 134 - This statement moreover, as far as I understand it, refers only to the common lands, which have been enclosed by acts of parliament. " With scarcely any exception," he says again, " the revenue drawn in the form of rent from the ownership of the soil, has been at least doubled in every part of Great Britain since 1790.
Página 273 - But in the present imperfect condition of society, luxury, though it may proceed from vice or folly, seems to be the only means that can correct the unequal distribution of property. The diligent mechanic and the skilful artist, who have obtained no share in the division of the earth, receive a voluntary tax from the possessors of land; and the latter are prompted, by a sense of interest, to improve those estates, with whose produce they may purchase additional pleasures.
Página 152 - And skims like a bird o'er the ice-bound flood ; Now he catches the gleam from the cabin door, Which tells that his toilsome journey's o'er. Our cabin is small, and coarse our cheer, But Love has spread the banquet here ; And childhood springs to be caressed By our well-beloved and welcome guest ; With a smiling brow his tale he tells, While the urchins ring the merry sleigh-bells. From the cedar-swamp the gaunt wolves howl, From the hollow oak loud whoops the owl, Scared by the crash of the falling...
Página 205 - ... which flourish in situations very distant from the coast, provided they occasionally receive breezes from the sea, communicate a saline impregnation to the soil in their immediate vicinity, derived from the salt which they doubtless had imbibed by the leaves. "Although the materials which are thus excreted by the roots are noxious to the plant which rejects them, and would consequently be injurious to other individuals of the same species, it does not therefore follow that they are incapable...
Página 326 - An Act to repeal the several Acts now in force relating to Bread to be sold out of the City of London and the Liberties thereof and beyond the Weekly Bills of Mortality and Ten Miles of the Royal Exchange; and to provide other Regulations for the making and Sale of Bread, and for preventing the Adulteration of Meal, Flour, and Bread, beyond the Limits aforesaid.

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