Thoreau: the Poet-naturalist: With Memorial Verses

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Roberts Brothers, 1873 - 357 páginas
This is a biography of transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau.
 

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Página 216 - tis the soul of peace : Of all the virtues, 'tis nearest kin to heaven ; It makes men look like gods. The best of men That e'er wore earth about him, was a sufferer; A soft, meek, patient, humble, tranquil spirit : The first true gentleman, that ever breathed.
Página 169 - Come, Sleep, O Sleep, the certain knot of peace. The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, The indifferent judge between the high and low!
Página vii - And all the shows o' the world, are frail and vain To weep a loss that turns their lights to shade. It is a woe " too deep for tears " when all Is reft at once, when some surpassing Spirit, Whose light adorned the world around it, leaves Those who remain behind...
Página 169 - You meaner beauties of the night, That poorly satisfy our eyes More by your number than your light ; You common people of the skies ; What are you when the moon shall rise?
Página 53 - I hearing get, who had but ears, And sight, who had but eyes before; I moments live, who lived but years, And truth discern, who knew but learning's lore.
Página 203 - I am black, as if bereaved of light. My mother taught me underneath a tree, And, sitting down before the -heat of day, She took me on her lap and kissed me, And, pointing to the east, began to say: 'Look on the rising sun, — there God...
Página 246 - Who God doth late and early pray More of his grace than gifts to lend; And entertains the harmless day With a religious book or friend — This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise or fear to fall: Lord of himself, though not of lands, And, having nothing, yet hath all.
Página 324 - The outward shows of sky and earth, Of hill and valley, he has viewed; And impulses of deeper birth Have come to him in solitude. In common things that round us lie, Some random truths he can impart: The harvest of a quiet eye That broods and sleeps on his own heart.
Página viii - To th' instruments divine respondence meet: The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmure of the waters fall : The waters fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call : The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Página 126 - She sings thy tears asleep, and dips Her kisses in thy weeping eye; She spreads the red leaves of thy lips, That in their buds yet blushing lie. She 'gainst those mother-diamonds tries The points of her young eagle's eyes. Welcome — though not to those gay flies, Gilded i...

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