Chatham's Colonial Policy: A Study in the Fiscal and Economic Implications of the Colonial Policy of the Elder Pitt

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G. Routledge & Sons, Limited, 1917 - 219 páginas
 

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Página 178 - I will be bold to affirm, that the profits to Great Britain from the trade of the colonies through all its branches, is two millions a year. This is the fund that carried you triumphantly through the last war. The estates that were rented at two thousand pounds a year, threescore years ago, are at three thousand at present. Those estates sold then from fifteen to eighteen years purchase; the same may now be sold for thirty.
Página 182 - Britain ; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, had, hath, and of right ought to have, full Power and Authority to make Laws and Statutes of sufficient Force and Validity to bind the Colonies and People of America, Subjects of the Crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever.
Página 88 - Property is private, individual, absolute. Trade is an extended and complicated consideration; it reaches as far as ships can sail or winds can blow; it is a great and various machine. To regulate the numberless movements...
Página 182 - Britain, and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, had, hath, and of Eight ought to have, full power and authority to make Laws and Statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the Colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever.
Página 175 - That governors often come to the colonies merely to make fortunes, with which they intend to return to Britain ; are not always men of the best abilities or integrity ; have many of them no estates here, nor any natural connections with us, that should make them heartily concerned for our welfare...
Página 19 - Nation, for such time as to His Wisdom seem'd good, to an high pitch of prosperity and glory ; by unanimity at home ; by confidence and reputation abroad ; by alliances wisely chosen and faithfully observed ; by colonies united and protected ; by decisive victories by sea and land; by conquests made by arms and generosity in every part of the globe ; by commerce, for the first time united with, and made to flourish by war; was pleased to raise up as a principal instrument in this memorable work WILLIAM...
Página 181 - America, if she fell, would fall like the strong man ; she would embrace the pillars of the State, and pull down the Constitution along with her. Is this your boasted peace — not to sheathe the sword in its scabbard, but to sheathe it in the bowels of your countrymen ? Will you quarrel with yourselves, now the whole house of Bourbon is united against you...
Página 11 - Sir, Spain knows the consequence of a war in America ; whoever gains, it must prove fatal to her : she knows it, and must therefore avoid it ; but she knows England does not dare to make it.
Página 16 - This convention, Sir, I think from my soul, is nothing but a stipulation for national ignominy ; an illusory expedient, to baffle the resentment of the nation; a truce without a suspension of hostilities on the part of Spain; on the part of England a suspension: As to Georgia, of the first law of nature, self-preservation and selfdefence...
Página 52 - Perhaps it is not too much to say, that sustaining this war, arduous as it has been and still is, may not be more difficult than properly and happily closing it. The materials in his Majesty's hands are certainly very many and great, and it is to be. hoped that in...

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