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The Register of the Order of the Garter, in his mantle, chain, and badge, and carrying

the Register of the Order.

The Marquis of Londonderry, Knight Companion of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, in the full habit, and wearing the Collar of the Order, his Cap and Feathers in his hand.

His Majesty's Vice-Chamberlain. James Marquis Graham, (eldest son of the Duke of Montrose,) attended by an Officer

of the Jewel House, in a scarlet mantle, with a crown embroidered on his left shoulder, bearing a cushion, on which were placed the Ruby Ring and the Sword to be girt

about the King. Comptroller of His Majesty's Household, Treasurer of His Majesty's Household, Lord George Thomas Beresford.

Lord Charles C. Bentinck, bearing

the crimson bag with the Medals. Bluemantle Pursuivant of Arms, in his tabard.

THE STANDARD OF HANOVER, borne by John Earl of Mayo, G. C. H. in his robes of estate of crimson velvet, attended

by a page bearing his coronet.
Cork Herald, in his tabard and collar of SS.

Islay Herald, in his tabarb and collar of Ss.
Barons, in their robes of estate of crimson velvet, their coronets in their hands, four

abreast.
Falcon Herald Extraordinary, in his tabard and collar of SS.
THE STANDARD OF IRELAND),

THE STANDARD OF SCOTLAND, borne by William Carr, Lord Beresford, borne by James Earl of Lauderdale, G. C. B. in his robes of estate of crimson K. T. in his robes of estate of crimson velvet, attended by a page bearing his velvet, attended by a page bearing his coronet.

coronet. The Bishops of Ireland and England, in their rochets, with their caps in their hands,

four abreast. Brunswick Herald, in his tabard and

Blanc Coursier Herald, in his tabarb collar of SS.

and collar of SS. Viscounts, in their robes of estate of crimson velvet, their coronets in their hands, four

abreast. York Herald, in his tabard and

Windsor Herald, in his tabard and collar of ss.

collar of SS. THE STANDARD OF ENGLAND, borne by Rowland Lord Hill, G. C. B. in his robes of estate of crimson velvet, attended

by a page bearing his coronet. Earls, in their robes of estate of crimson velvet, their coronets in their hands, four abreast.

Somerset Herald, in his tabard and collar of SS.
Richmond Herald, in his tabard and collar of SS.

THE UNION STANDARD, borne by William Earl Harcourt

, G.C. B. in his robes of estate of crimson velvet, at.

tended by a page bearing his coronet. Marquises, in their robes of estate of crimson velvet, their coronets in their hands, four

abreast.
The Lord Steward of His Majesty's Household.

George James Marquis of Cholmondeley,
in his robes of estate of crimson velvet, his coronet in his hand.
Lancaster Herald, in his tabard and collar of SS.

THE ROYAL STANDARD, borne by Charles Earl of Harrington, G. C. H. in his robes of estate of crimson velvet,

attended by a page bearing his coronet. King of Arms of the Ionian Gloucester King of Arms, in Hanover King of Arms, Order of St Michael and St his tabard and collar, crown in his tabard and collar, George, in his tabard and in his hand.

crown in his hand. collar, crown in his hand. Dukes, in their robes of estate of crimson velvet, their coronets in their hands,

four abreast. Ulster King of Arms, in Clarenceux King of Arms, Norroy King of Arms, by his tabard and collar, by Norroy, in his tabard Chester Herald, in his taand crown in his hand. and collar, and crown in bard and collar, and crown his hand.

in his hand. The Lord Privy Seal, John Earl of The Lord President of the Council, Westmoreland, K.G. in his robes of Dudley Earl of Harrowby, in his robes estate of crimson velvet, and coronet in of estate of crimson velvet, and coronet his hand.

in his hand.

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The Lord Archbishop of York, in his rochet, and cap in his hand. The Lord High Chancellor, John Earl of Eldon, in his robes of estate of crimson velvet, with his coronet in his hand, bearing the seals, and attended by his Purse-bearer. The Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, in his rochet, and cap in his hand.

Two Serjcants at Arms, with their maces.

THE REGALIA. St Edward's Staff, borne by The Gold Spurs, borne by The Sceptre with the Cross, James Marquis of Salis George Gough Lord Cal. borne by Richard Mar. bury, K. G. in his robes of thorpe, in his robes of estate quis Wellesley, K. G. in estate of crimson velvet, and of crimson velvet, and coro his robes of estate of crimcoronet in his hand. net in his hand.

son velvet, and coronet in his

hand. The third Sword, borne by Curtana, borne by Henry The second Sword, borne by George Earl of Galloway, Pelham Duke of New Hugh Duke of NorthumK. T. in his robes of castle, K. G. in his robes berland, K. G. in his robes estate of crimson vel. of estate of crimson vel. of estate of crimson velvet, and coronet in his vet, and coronet in his vet, and coronet in his hand. hand.

hand. Two Serjeants at Arms, with their maces.

Usher of the Green Rod. Usher of the White Rod. The Lord Mayor of Lyon King of Arms Deputy to Garter Gentleman Usher of London, the Right of Scotland, March. Principal King of the Black Rod, Sir Hon. John Thomas mont Herald, in his Arms, Sir G. Nay. Thomas Tyrwhitt, Thorp, in his robe, tabard, carrying his ler, Kt. Clarenceus Knt. bearing his rod. collar and jewel, crown and sceptre, King of Arms, in bearing the city acting for Thomas his tabard and colsceptre or mace. Robert Earl of Kin- lar, carrying his noull.

crown and sceptre. The Deputy Lord Great Chamberlain of England, Peter Robert Lord Gwydyr, in his robes of estate of crimson velvet, carrying his coronet and his white staff.

His Royal HIGHNESS THE PRINCE LEOPOLD, In the full habit of the Order of the Garter, carrying in his right hand his baton as

Field Marshal, and in his left hand his cap and feathers; his train borne by LieutCol. Sir Robert Gardiner, K. C. B.

His Royal HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF GLOUCESTER, In his robes of estate of crimson velvet, carrying his coronet ; his train borne by Sir

Archibald Murray, Bart. His ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE, In his robes of estate of crimson velvet, carrying his coronet; and his train borne by

Vice-Admiral Fraser.

His ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF SUSSEX, In his robes of estate of crimson velvet, carrying his coronet in his hand ; his train borne

by Major General Ogg. His ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF CLARENCE, In his robes of estate of crimson velvet, carrying in his right hand his baton, and in his

left his coronet; his train borne by Captain Pechell, R. N.

His ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF YORK, In his robes of estate of crimson velvet, carrying in his right hand his baton, as Field

Marshal, and his coronet in his left hand ; and his train borne by Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Frederick Cooke. The High Constable of Ireland, Henry The High Constable of Scotland, George Marquis of Lansdown, in his robes of Lord Gordon, G. C. B. commonly called estate of crimson velvet, his coronet in his Marquis of Huntly, (acting as Deputy hand, with his staff.

to William George Earl of Erroll, a minor,) in his robes of estate of crimson vel.

vet, his coronet in his hand, with his staff. Two Serjeants at Arms, with their maces. The Earl Marshal of Eng. The Sword of State borne The Lord High Constaland represented by Ken. by Charles Dukeof Dorset, bie of England, Arthur neth Alexander Lord How. in his robes of estate of Duke of Wellington, K. ard of Effingham, G.C.B. crimson velvet, attended by G. in his robes of estate of in his robes of estate of a Page, carrying his coro crimson velvet, carrying crimson velvet, his coronet

his coronet and staff, alin his hand, carrying his

tended by a Page carrying staff, attended by a Page.

his baton of Field Marshal.

net.

A Gentleman carrying the staff of the Lord High

Steward.

Steward.
ronet of the Lord High
A Gentleman carrying the co-

Twenty of His Majesty's Band of Gentlemen Pensioners, carry

ing their axes.

ing their axes. Gentlemen Pensioners, carryTwenty of His Majesty's Band of

Two Serjeants at Arms, with their maces.
The Sceptre with the St Edward's Crown, The Orb, carried by
Dove, carried by John carried by the Lord Wm. Spencer Duke
Henry Duke of Rute High Steward, Henry of Devonshire, in his
land, K. G. in his William Marquis of robes of estate of
robes of estate of Anglesey, K. G. in his crimson velvet, with
crimson velvet, with robes of estate of his coronet in his left
his coronet in his left crimson velvet.

hand.
hand.

The Patina, borne The Bible, borne The Chalice, borne
by the Lord Bishop by the Lord Bishop by the Lord Bishop
of Gloucester.
of Ely.

of Chester.
Supporter, THE KING, Supporter,
The Lord Bishop In his Royal Robes, wearing a Cap The Lord 'Bishop
of Lincoln, for of Estate adorned with Jewels, un of Oxford, for the
the Lord Bishop der a Canopy of Cloth of Gold, Lord Bishop of
of Bath and supported by sixteen Barons of Durham.
Wells.

the Cinque Ports; his Majesty's
Train borne by eight eldest Sons of

Peers, viz.
The Marquis of Douro. The Earl of Surrey.
The Earl of Brecknock. The Viscount Cranbourn.
The Earl of Rocksavage. The Earl of Uxbridge.
Viscount Ingestrie, son

The Earl of Rawdon.
of the Lord Lieutenant
of Ireland.
Assisted by Lord Francis Conyngham, Master of the Robes,

and followed by the Groom of the Robes to his Majesty. Standard Bearer of the Band of Gentlemen Lieutenant of the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners.

Pensioners. Captain of the Yeomen of the Silver Stick, acting for Captain of the Band of GenGuards, George Earl of Charles Earl of Harrington, tlemen Pensioners, James Macclesfield, in his robes of the Gold Stick of the Life George Earl of Courtown, in estate of crimson velvet, his Guards in Waiting, who his robes of estate of crimson coronet in his hand. bore the Royal Standard. velvet, his coronet in his hand,

Lords of his Majesty's Bed Chamber.

Keeper of his Majesty's Privy Purse.
The Right Honourable Sir Benjamin Bloomfield, G. C. H. bearing the Privy Purse.

The Assistant Falconer.
Grooms of his Majesty's Bed Chamber.
Gentlemen Ushers of the Privy Chamber.

Equerries of his Majesty.
Physicians to his Majesty.
Serjeant-Surgeons to his Majesty.
Gentlemen Ushers Daily Waiters.
Grooms of the Privy Chamber.

Pages of Honour to his Majesty.
Extra Pages of Honour to his Majesty.

Aides-de-Camp of his Majesty.
Extra Aides-de-Camp of his Majesty.

Gentlemen Ushers Quarterly Waiters.
Apothecary to his Majesty. Surgeon to his Majesty.

Private Solicitors to his Majesty.
Ensign of the Yeomen of the Guard. Lieutenant of the Yeomen of the Guard.

His Majesty's Pages, in full state liveries.

His Majesty's Footmen, in full state liveries. Exons of the Yeomen of the Yeomen of the Guard. Exons of the Yeomen of the Guard.

Guard. Harbinger of the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners. Clerk of the Cheque of the Yeomen of Clerk of the Cheque of the Band of the Guard.

Gentlemen Pensioners. Yeomen of the Guard, who closed the procession. N.B. The Knights of the several Osders wore their respective Collars. On the arrival of the procession at the Abbey, the Herb. Woman with her Maids, and the Serjeant-Porter, remained at the entrance within the great west door; the drums and trumpets filed off to their gallery over the entrance to the

Choir. The Choristers of the Chapel Royal and of Westminster proceeded with his Majesty's Band to the organ gal.

lery ; and, on his Majesty's entering the Abbey, the Choirs commenced singing the Hallelujah Chorus in Handel's' Oratorio of the Messiah, after which a scene from the Oratorio of Saul, followed by the Anthem : “ I was glad when they said unto me, We will go into the House of the Lord,” &c. &c. Immediately after the conclusion of the Hallelujah Chorus, and before the remainder of the music, the King's Scholars of Westminster School, from the platform gallery over the entrance into the Choir, with their Masters, greeted his Majesty with repeated shouts of “ Vivat GEORGIUS Rex.”

The Prebendaries and Dean of Westminster filed off to the left, about the middle of the nave, and there awaited the King's coming into the Church ; when they fell into the procession next before the Kings of Arms who preceded the Great Officers.

As the procession entered the Choir, the several persons composing it were conducted to their seats by the Officers of Arms, the Prebendaries of Westminster proceeding to their places near the Altar.

The Princes of the Blood Royal were conducted to their seats as Peers, and the Prince Leopold to his seat in the Royal Box.

The Barons of the Cinque Ports who bore the Canopy, and the Gentlemen Pensioners, remained at the entrance of the Choir, where the Standards were received from the Noblemen who bore them by the Officers of Arms, and by them delivered to Pages.

The King, ascending the Theatre, passed on the south side of the Throne to his Chair of State on the east side thereof, opposite to the Altar; and after his private devotion, (kneeling down upon the Fald-Stool,) took his seat, the two Bishops, his supporters, standing on each side; the Noblemen bearing the four swords on his right hand, the Deputy Lord Great Chamberlain and the Lord High Constable on his left ; the Great Officers of State, the Lord Howard of Effingham, acting as Earl Marshal, the Dean of Westminster, the Noblemen bearing the Regalia, Trainbearers, Deputy Garter, Lyon King of Arms, the Lord Mayor of London, and Black Rod, standing about the King's Chair.

Upon the conclusion of the Anthem, the Archbishop of Canterbury, together with the Lord Chancellor, the Deputy Lord Great Chamberlain, the Lord High Constable, and Lord Howard of Effingham, acting as Earl Marshal, preceded by Deputy Garter, went to the east side of the Theatre, where the Archbishop made the recognition, and repeated the same at the south, west, and north sides of the Theatre : during which his Majesty was standing, and turned towards the people on the side on which the recognition was made : the people replying with loud and repeated acclamations of God save King GEORGE the Fourth;" and at the last recognition, the trumpets sounded, and the drums beat.

His Majesty then took his seat, and the Bible, the Chalice, and Patina, were carried to and placed upon the Altar by the Bishops who had borne them in the procession.

The King then passed to the Altar ; where his Majesty, kneeling, made his first offering of a Pall or Altar-Cloth of gold, and afterwards his second offering of an Ingot of gold. The King was then conducted to the Chair of State on the south side of the area, and the Regalia, except the Swords, were laid on the Altar.

The Litany was then read by the Bishops of London and Bangor, vested in copes. Next was read the beginning of the communion service by the Archbishop of Canterbury; and after it a sermon was delivered by the Archbishop of York; which being concluded, the Archbishop of Canterbury, advancing to the King, administered the Coronation Oath, (his Majesty having, on Thursday the 27th day of April 1820, in the presence of the two Houses of Parliament, made and subscribed the Declaration.) The King then arose from his Chair of State, and proceeded uncovered to the Altar, where, kneel. ing upon the cushion laid on the steps, and placing his hand on the Holy Gospels, his Majesty took the oath, and added thereto his Royal Sign Manual. The King returned to his chair, and the Hymn, “ Come Holy Ghost, our Souls inspire," &c. was sung ; after which the Archbishop read the prayer preparatory to the anointing. At the conclusion of this prayer the Choirs sung thé Anthem, “ Zadock the Priest,” &c. during which the King was disrobed of his crimson robes, and his Majesty taking off his cap of state, the robes and cap were carried into St Edward's Chapel. King Edward's Chair, covered with cloth of gold, having been placed in front of the Altar, his Majesty took his seat therein to be anointed; when the following four Knights of the Garter, viz. the Duke of Beaufort, the Marquis Camden, the Earl of Winchelsea, and the Marquis of Londonderry, being summoned by Deputy Garter, held over the King's head a rich pall of cloth of gold ; and the Dean of Westminster, holding the ampulla containing the consecrated oil, and pouring some into the anointing spoon, the Archbishop anointed his Majesty therewith.

The King then kneeling, the Archbishop pronounced the benediction.

His Majesty was next arrayed with the supertunica of cloth of gold, and a girdle of the same for the sword, when the spurs were taken from the Altar, and his Majesty's heels having been touched therewith, they were again laid upon the Altar,

His Majesty, standing up, was girt with the Sword, which his Majesty afterwards of fered at the Altar, in the scabbard, and retiring to his chair, the Sword was redeemed.

His Majesty rising, was invested with the Imperial Mantle or Dalmatic Robe, of cloth of gold, and with the Armil.

The King then sat down, and received from the Archbishop the Orb, which his Majesty afterwards returned to the Dean, who laid it upon the Altar.

The Ruby Ring was placed by the Archbishop on the fourth finger of the King's right hand, and the Dean brought from the Altar the two Sceptres with the Cross and Dove, and delivered them to the Archbishop.

Bernard Edward Duke of Norfolk, as Lord of the Manor of Worksop, then presented his Majesty with a pair of Gloves, richly embroidered with the arms of Howard, which his Majesty put on; and the Archbishop delivered the Sceptre with the Cross into his Majesty's right hand, and the Sceptre with the Dove into his left hand ; the Lord of the Manor of Worksop supporting his Majesty's right arm, and holding the Sceptre, as oca casion required.

The Archbishop standing before the Altar, and having taken St Edward's Crown into his hands, consecrated and blessed it, and, assisted by the other Bishops, his Grace came from the Altar, the Dean of Westminster carrying the Crown, which the Archbishop received and placed on his Majesty's head ; while the people, with loud and repeated sbouts, cried, “ GOD SAVE THE KING !" the trumpets sounding, the drums beating, and the Tower and Park guns firing by signal. The Peers then put on their coronete, the Bishops their caps, and the Kings of Arms their crowns. The acclamations ceasing, the Archbishop pronounced the Exhortation, and the Choirs sang the Anthem, “ The King shall rejoice in thy strength," &c.

The Archbishop then presented the Bible to the King, and his Majesty having returned the same to the Archbishop, it was replaced on the Altar,

The Archbishop having pronounced the Benediction ; the King kissed the Archbishops and Bishops, who knelt before him. The “ Te Deum” was then sung, during which the King removed to his chair, on the east side of the throne; and, at the conclusion, his Majesty was enthroned by the Bishops and Peers, and the Archbishop pronounced the exhortation ; whereupon the Archbishop advanced to the steps of the Throne, and, ascending, knelt before the King, and for himself and the other Lords Spiritual, pronounced the words of Homage, the Archbishop of York and the Bishops kneeling around him, and, for themselves, repeating after him. The Archbishop then kissed his Majesty's left cheek, as did the Archbishop of York, and the rest of the Bishops, and retired.

Then his Royal Highness the Duke of York advanced to the steps of the Throne, and, ascending, took off his coronet, and kneeling before the King, for himself and the other Dukes of the Blood Royal, who severally took off their coronets and knelt with him and about him, pronounced the words of Homage, the rest of the Royal Dukes, for them. selves, repeating after him. Then his Royal Highness touched the Crown upon his Majesty's head, and having kissed his Majesty's left cheek, as did the rest of the Dukes of the Blood Royal, retired.

Then the Duke of Norfolk advanced in like manner to the Throne, and being followed by the rest of the Dukes, took off his coronet, kpelt before the King, and, for himself and the other Dukes, who also took off their coronets and knelt with him and about him, pronounced the words of Homage, the rest of the same degree, for themselves, repeating after him. After which his Grace touched the Crown upon his Majesty's head, and kis. sed his Majesty's left cheek, as did the rest of the Dukes after him, and retired.

The Marquis of Winchester advanced with the rest of the Marquises : The Earl of Denbigh with the rest of the Earls : The Lord Viscount Hereford with the rest of the Viscounts : and the Lord Audley with the rest of the Barons, and each degree scverally and respectively did their Homage in like manner, and retired.

During this part of the solemnity, the Sceptre with the Cross was held on the King's right hand by the Duke of Norfolk, as Lord of the Manor of Worksop, and the Sceptre Fith the Dove by the Duke of Rutland : The Treasurer of his Majesty's Houselıold, throwing about the Medals of the Coronation, as his Majesty's Princely Largesse or Donative.

The Peers who bore the Regalia, on advancing to do their Homage, severally delivered the same to the Deputy Lord Great Chamberlain, by whom they were returned after the Homage had been performed.

After the Homage, the Bishop of Salisbury, who read the Epistle, and the Bishop of St David's, who read the Gospel, received from the Altar, by the hands of the Arch. bishop, the Patina and the Chalice, which they carried into St Edward's Chapel, and brought from thence the bread upon the Patina and the wine in the Chalice.

His Majesty then descended from the Throne, and went to the Altar, where, having taken off his Crown, his Majesty received the sacrament, the Archbishop administering the bread, and the Dean of Westminster the cup.

The Choir then sang the last Anthem, “ 'Blessed be thou, Lord God of Israel,” &c. ; and, at the conclusion, the trumpets sounded, the drums beat, and, amidst the acclamations of the assembly, the King put on his Crown ; and, taking the two Sceptres in his hands, again ascended the Throne, and sat there supported and attended as before, until

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