THE CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

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Página ii - II. Physics and Politics ; or, Thoughts on the Application of the Principles of "Natural Selection " and " Inheritance
Página 241 - ... from giving a fuller account of these suggestive essays, only because we are sure that our readers will find it worth their while to peruse the book for themselves ; and we sincerely hope that the forthcoming parts of the 'International Scientific Series' will be as interesting."— A thenozum,
Página 241 - Bagehot, which is not only very lucid and charming, but also original and suggestive in the highest degree. Nowhere since the publication of Sir Henry Maine's 'Ancient Law,' have we seen so many fruitful thoughts suggested in the course of a couple of hundred pages. . . . To do justice to Mr. Bagehot's fertile book, would require a long article. With the best of intentions, we are conscious of having given but a sorry account of it in these brief paragraphs. But we hope we have said enough to commend...
Página 242 - While, in the strongest manner, asserting the union of mind with brain, he yet denies 'the association of union in place, but asserts the union of close succession in time,' holding that ' the same being is, by alternate fits, under extended and under unextended consciousness.
Página 241 - The * Forms of Water/ by Professor Tyndall, is an interesting and instructive little volume, admirably printed and illustrated. Prepared expressly for this series, it is in some measure a guarantee of the excellence of the volumes that will follow, and an indication that the publishers will spare no pains to include in the series the freshest investigations of the best scientific minds.
Página 242 - The union of scientific and popular treatment in the composition of this work will afford an attraction to many readers who would have been indifferent to purely theoretical details. . . . Still his work abounds in information, much of which is of great value, and a part of which could not easily be obtained from other sources. Its interest is decidedly enhanced for students who demand both clearness and exactness of statement, by the profusion of well-executed woodcuts, diagrams, and tables, which...
Página 241 - Law,' have we seen so many fruitful thoughts suggested in the course of a couple of hundred pages. . . . To do justice to Mr. Bagehot's fertile book, would require a long article. With the best of intentions, we are conscious of having given but a sorry account of it in these brief paragraphs. But we hope we have said enough to commend it to the attention of the thoughtful reader."— Prof.
Página 241 - Tyndall, was a model of lucid and attractive scientific exposition ; and now we have a second, by Mr. Walter Bagehot, which is not only very lucid and charming, but also original and suggestive in the highest degree. Nowhere since the publication of Sir Henry Maine's * Ancient Law,' have we seen so many fruitful thoughts suggested in the course of a couple of hundred pages.
Página 211 - From the ingress of a sensation, to the outgoing responses in action, the mental succession is not for an instant dissevered from a physical succession.
Página 134 - Aristotle decides that there is no void, on such arguments as this:' — In a void there could be no difference of up and down; for as in nothing there are no differences, so there are none in a privation or negation...

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