The Universal Magazine, Volumen37

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Pub. for J. Hinton., 1765
 

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Página 281 - This will of his maker is called the law of nature. For as God, when he created matter, and endued it with a principle of mobility, established certain rules for the perpetual direction of that motion ; so, when he created man, and endued him with freewill to conduct himself in all parts of life, he laid down certain immutable laws of human nature, [**] whereby that freewill is in some degree regulated and restrained, and gave him also the faculty of reason to discover the purport of those laws...
Página 216 - Resolved, That his Majesty's liege people, the inhabitants of this colony are not bound to yield obedience to any law or ordinance whatever, designed to impose any taxation whatsoever upon them other than the laws or ordinances of the General Assembly aforesaid.
Página 54 - The thing that governs greatly in this determination is, that the point of law is not to be determined by juries ; juries have a power by law to determine matters of fact only : and it is of the greatest consequence to the law of England...
Página 70 - HOBART (according to order) reported from the Committee of the whole Houfe...
Página 284 - ... yet Tacitus treats this notion of a mixed government, formed out of them all, and partaking of the advantages of each, as a visionary whim, and one that, if effected, could never be lasting or secure.
Página 314 - When they solicit the alliance, offensive or defensive, of a whole nation, they send an embassy with a large belt of wampum and a bloody hatchet, inviting them to come and drink the blood of their enemies. The wampum made use of on these and other occasions, before their acquaintance with the Europeans, was nothing but small shells "which they picked up by the...
Página 54 - Juries have a power by law to determine matters of fact only, and it is of the greatest consequence to the law of England and to the subject, that these powers of the judge and jury be kept distinct ; that the judge determine the law and the jury the fact, and if ever they come to be confounded, it will prove the confusion and destruction of the law of England1.
Página 288 - Our rods would not move at all ; the candles and torches, also, but one were extinguished, or burned very dimly. John Scott, my partner, was amazed, looked pale, knew not what to think or do, until I gave directions and command to dismiss the demons ; which, when done, all was quiet again, and each man returned unto his lodging late, about twelve o'clock at night.
Página 325 - Act to indemnify such Persons in the United Kingdom as have omitted to qualify themselves for Offices and Employments, and...
Página 189 - Majefty, to rep!a:e to the finking fund the like fum paid out of the fame, to make good the deficiency, on the 5th...

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