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“Has Bob turned hedgehog

“ Yes—money.

I think he's since he succeeded ? I forgot fond of me; but he likes the

I was sorry, Betty. I saw it idea of Mereworth and that, in the papers. Your father was you know. It's awfully sordid; very good to me.

It's no use

but they all wanted it—and I talking about it; I'm sorry.” don't seem to matter much.” She said nothing, but laid her

then I haven't a hand for a moment on his arm. rival. Sill, I hate the fellow.

· But about Bob he must Who is he?" have had a reason. Tell it “Arthur Fairbrother. His

Ah! come and let us sit father's manufacturer on those chairs." They sat in place called Elton, in Yorksilence for

moments shire.” Herbert compressing his lips, " Fairbrother Elton - by Betty scratching in the dust Jove! Did you ever read my with her parasol. Then he dad's pamphlet—“The Cost of said quietly, “You're going to our Vulgarians '?

I suppose be married ?

not. Why, this Fairbrother

one of the villains of it. “Am I to have back my The dad went down, it seems, ring ?” She met his eyes, per- and talked with his work-people. plexed. He had almost ban- Well, Fairbrother's got back ished appeal from them, but his this time. But I don't like it, lips twitched.

Bet. Do you understand what “Honour, Betty. It pledges your money will come from? you to nothing but a feeling, Well — it's no use to bother and I shall never remind you. you, and I won't talk economics. Am I to have back my ring ?” What's the fellow like?

“No, Herbert. I shall keep You saw him last night. your ring.”

Bob says he was talking to He gave a slow sigh of relief, him when you went by. ” and leaned back on the little “ That fellow ! Yes; I saw green chair. Lady Betty spoke him, and I loathed him. I quickly, digging at the ground. loathe the type. It's all right “ Understand, Herbert. This chopping wood or fighting in

the man I'm going to the ranks; but I can't stand it marry—is fond of me, I know, carrying its clumsy manners and I don't dislike him. I'm into drawing-rooms and giving going to be — to be a good the tone to all England. Curse wife, you know.”

him! A sleek, confident, stupid, “Yes, yes,” he said, smiling; purse-proud pig! Betty, I can't “I understand. But you care let you go to a creature like for me and you keep my ring. that.” Of course I knew you'd marry Lady Betty laughed for the

- you can't help yourself—and first time. “ You'd have said I've not come back with a for- something of that kind whotune at the right poetical mo- ever it was, and he's not like ment. Tell me about it. It's that. He's rather a sportsman: money, I suppose ?"

he can fence awfully well, and

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ride decently too. One of these would avoid them all, and days you'll have to like him, having seen Betty Flair only, and we'll all be friends. Not and heard the certain news he

You'd only quarrel with expected, go back to the minBob if you came to us. You ing and his good friend, see he thinks you might spoil Holland. things. It's use talking “ There's no use in my stayabout it. Tell me about your. ing. I suppose you're going self.”

down to Mereworth for Whit“ “Oh, if you like

suntide. You gave up the old He had gone to Coolgardie 31st custom after I was sent and worked like a nigger in a into exile, didn't you? That mine for some months. It was

was nice of

you." not amusing, but he said it re- “Yes; but this year Hugh lieved his feelings. Then he Sinclair persuaded Bob to rehad fallen in with a man who vive it." was making a fortune there- “No? But I wish I were a good fellow, a gentleman, and going. I suppose Bob wouldn't yet, more oddly, a scholar, and ask me? I'd leave England with it all a keen man of busi- the next day, and it would be ness—the only combination of something to remember. the sort Herbert had met, and “ Arthur Fairbrother's comindeed it is strange to most ing." of us, his seniors.

This man

" Thank you, that's enough. liked to talk with him in long He'll be a beautiful figure in a nights when it was too hot to cavalier suit. You'll enjoy it sleep, and gave him work in his immensely." office, and lent him money for "Herbert, dear, don't be a a speculation in which he had brute. I didn't wish to ask made £200. Whereupon he de- him, but Bob seems so anxious termined to come to England to please him." She lifted her to spend it. His friend called little troubled face, and Herhim a fool, and said he would bert begged her pardon. Then never be rich, but gave him he said: “I have one thing to So he had come say

before

you go. back, himself hardly knowing marry this Fairbrother chap why—to leave his narrative for you'll have ever so many thousa moment nor quite under-ands a-year, and all the Engstanding the old memory and lish society you want. If you affection, which was hardly marry me

- no, wait till I've passion then, and yet drew his finished—you can come back to wavering steps

steps more surely Coolgardie, and you'd be desthan his faint hope of money- perately dull. But you'd be making stayed them. But treated with respect. And I'd when he came, he dreaded the work. Holland told me that old friends for whom he did if once convinced him I'd put not care, and the questions my back into it, and be devoted to which he had so poor an

to the business and give all my answer. So he thought he mind to it, he'd see I made a

leave to go.

If you “I see,

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I suppose

“ Yes.”

was

“Has Bob turned hedgehog “Yes—money. I think he's since he succeeded ? I forgot fond of me; but he likes the -I was sorry, Betty. I saw it idea of Mereworth and that, in the papers. Your father was you know. It's awfully sordid; very good to me.

It's no use

but they all wanted it—and I talking about it ; I'm sorry. don't seem to matter much." She said nothing, but laid her

then I haven't a hand for a moment on his arm. rival. Sill, I hate the fellow.

“But about Bob - he must Who is he?" have had a

Tell it “ Arthur Fairbrother. His me. Ah! come and let us sit father's manufacturer on those chairs.” They sat in place called Elton, in Yorksilence for some moments

shire. Herbert compressing his lips, “ Fairbrother Elton by Betty scratching in the dust Jove! Did you ever read my with her parasol. Then he dad's pamphlet—The Cost of said quietly, “You're going to our Vulgarians'? be married ?”

not. Why, this Fairbrother

one of the villains of it. “Am I to have back my The dad went down, it seems, ring ?” She met his eyes, per- and talked with his work-people. plexed. He had almost ban- Well, Fairbrother's got back ished appeal from them, but his this time. But I don't like it, lips twitched.

Bet. Do you understand what “Honour, Betty. It pledges your money will come from? you to nothing but a feeling, Well — it's no use to bother and I shall never remind you. you, and I won't talk economics. Am I to have back my ring ?” What's the fellow like?

“No, Herbert. I shall keep “You saw him last night. your ring.”

Bob says he was talking to He gave a slow sigh of relief, him when you went by.” and leaned back on the little " That fellow! Yes; I saw green chair. Lady Betty spoke him, and I loathed him. I quickly, digging at the ground. loathe the type. It's all right “ Understand, Herbert. This chopping wood or fighting in man — the man I'm going to the ranks; but I can't stand it marry—is fond of me, I know, carrying its clumsy manners and I don't dislike him. I'm into drawing-rooms and giving going to be — to be a good the tone to all England. Curse wife, you know.”

him! A sleek, confident, stupid, “Yes, yes,” he said, smiling; purse-proud pig! Betty, I can't “I understand.

But you care

let you go to a creature like for me and you keep my ring that.” Of course I knew you'd marry Lady Betty laughed for the -you can't help yourself—and first time. “ You'd have said I've not come back with a for- something of that kind whotune at the right poetical mo- ever it was, and he's not like ment. Tell me about it. It's that. He's rather a sportsman: money, I suppose ? '

he can fence awfully well, and

no

It was

ride decently too. One of these would avoid them all, and days you'll have to like him, having seen Betty Flair only, and we'll all be friends. Not and heard the certain news he now. You'd only quarrel with expected, go back to the minBob if you came to us. You ing and

his

good friend, see he thinks you might spoil Holland. things. It's use talking “ There's no use in my stayabout it. Tell me about your- ing. I suppose you're going self."

down to Mereworth for Whit“Oh, if you like

suntide. You gave up the old He had gone to Coolgardie 31st custom after I was sent and worked like a nigger in a into exile, didn't you? That mine for some months.

was nice of you." not amusing, but he said it re- “Yes; but this year Hugh lieved his feelings. Then he Sinclair persuaded Bob to rehad fallen in with a man who vive it." was making a fortune there- “No? But I wish I were a good fellow, a gentleman, and going. I suppose Bob wouldn't yet, more oddly, a scholar, and ask me? I'd leave England with it all a keen man of busi- the next day, and it would be ness—the only combination of something to remember.” the sort Herbert had met, and “ Arthur Fairbrother's comindeed it is strange to most ing." of us, his seniors.

This man

“ Thank you, that's enough. liked to talk with him in long He'll be a beautiful figure in a nights when it was too hot to cavalier suit. You'll enjoy it sleep, and gave him work in his immensely." office, and lent him money for “Herbert, dear, don't be a a speculation in which he had brute. I didn't wish to ask made £200. Whereupon he de- him, but Bob seems so anxious termined to come to England to please him.” She lifted her to spend it. His friend called little troubled face, and Herhim a fool, and said he would bert begged her pardon. Then never be rich, but gave him he said: “I have one thing to leave to go. So he had come say

before

you go. back, himself hardly knowing marry this Fairbrother chap why—to leave his narrative for you'll have ever so many

thousa moment nor quite under- ands a-year, and all the Engstanding the old memory and lish society you want. affection, which was hardly marry me - no, wait till I've passion then, and yet drew his finished—you can come back to wavering steps more surely Coolgardie, and you'd be desthan his faint hope of money- perately dull. But you'd be making stayed them. But treated with respect. And I'd when he came, he dreaded the work. Holland told me that old friends for whom he did if I once convinced him I'd put not care, and the questions my back into it, and be devoted to which he had so poor an to the business and give all my

So he thought he mind to it, he'd see I made a

If you

If you

answer.

decent income, and very likely murmured the bright chorus put me in the way of a fortune, of a song she remembered-and he's a gentleman and a man of his word. I should

“Si vous v'lez venir avec moihate it, but I'd do it for you.

Ou la la, ou la la

Madame, prenez mon bras ! In ten years we might come Ou la, ou la, ou la la." back and live decently, and all my crimes would be forgotten.

“But you don't, do you? Will you marry me?”

So good-bye, good-bye, dear.” She bent down

over her

They shook hands, and he parasol, and then her little swung quickly away, head and her big hat shook. As he turned into Piccadilly “No-I can't. I can't make at Hyde Park Corner he recogenemies of everybody. I can't nised Fairbrother, looking very give everything up. I'm fond prosperous and content, and of you—but not like that. It's walking westwards. Fairbro

ther, self-absorbed, did

did not Herbert stood up. “Well, notice the glance, which, seemgood-bye, my little weak dar- ing to look indifferently over ling - I knew you wouldn't. his head, took in his appearOne can't expect it in our little ance very accurately; but Herweak world.” He stood before bert, when he had passed him, her smiling: the place was set his mouth and looked empty where they were, and as savage. he glanced round it, the trim Lady Betty sat on, and grass and trees, shining de- dropped a few tears as women murely in the noon-day sun, use, and presently took her inseemed to hint of comedy. He nocent baby face to lunch with broke into his light laugh, and her family.

no use.

CHAPTER V.

They had dined at six-a “Fair ladies, and my dear compromise ; but it was sup- friends, you who have honoured posed that Sir Eustace Flair my poor house and my simple of old may well have postponed feast, and you whose natural his dinner-hour in view of the place is here ”—he smiled at business and rejoicings to be Lady Betty and nodded to done when he came to his own : Arthur Fairbrother—“I ask you they had dined at six, and the to drink with me the health of sky was red over the sea with the gentleman behind my

chair. the setting sun when Bob Sir Eustace Flair, wherever he Mereworth rose in his place. may be!” His pleasant face was flushed, They all rose, and held their and he raised his glass with a glasses towards the silent, pale jovial gesture, and seemed figure on complacent in his knowledge Eustace Flair !" and they of old phrases.

emptied their glasses.

canvas.

Sir

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