History of the United Netherlands: From the Death of William the Silent to the Twelve Years' Truce--1609, Volumen1

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Harper & Brothers, 1861
Vol. 1-2, pub. 1861, have title : History of the United Netherlands from the death of William the Silent to the Synod of Dort. With a full view of the English-Dutch struggle against Spain and of the origin and destruction of the Spanish armada.
 

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Página 55 - Barneveld and Buys, or pores with Farnese over coming victories and vast schemes of universal conquest; he reads the latest bit of scandal, the minutest characteristic of king or minister, chronicled by the gossiping Venetians for the edification of the Forty ; and after all this prying and eavesdropping, having seen the crosspurposes, the bribings, the windings in the dark, he is not surprised if those who were systematically deceived did not always arrive at correct conclusions.
Página 138 - And thus he paused for a moment, with much work already accomplished, but his hardest life-task before him ; still in the noon of manhood, a fine martial figure, standing, spear in hand, full in the sunlight, though all the scene around him was wrapped in gloom — a noble, commanding shape, entitled to the admiration which the energetic display of great powers, however unscrupulous, must always command. A dark, meridional physiognomy ; a quick, alert, imposing head...
Página 7 - Three centuries have nearly passed since this memorable epoch, and the world knows the fate of the states which accepted the dogma which it was Philip's life-work to enforce, and of those who protested against the system. The Spanish and Italian peninsulas have had a different history from that which records the career of France, Prussia, the Dutch commonwealth, the British empire, the transatlantic Republic.
Página 382 - God hath stirred up this action," he repeated again, " to be a school to breed up soldiers to defend the freedom of England, which through these long times of peace and quietness is brought into a most dangerous estate, if it should be attempted. Our delicacy is such that we are already weary, yet this journey is naught in respect to the misery and hardship that soldiers must and do endure.
Página 2 - Lord was better pleased with adverbs than nouns ;"2 the well-known result being that the traitor was hanged and the Sovereign saved. Yet such was the condition of Europe at that day. A small, dull, elderly, imperfectly-educated, patient, plodding invalid, with white hair and protruding under-jaw, and dreary visage, was sitting day after day, seldom speaking, never smiling, seven or eight hours out of every twenty-four, at a writing table covered with heaps of interminable despatches, in a cabinet...
Página 358 - Declaration, uij sup. cau dwell with more unalloyed delight. Not in- romantic fiction was there ever created a more attractive incarnation of martial valour, poetic genius, and purity of heart. If the mocking spirit of the soldier of Lepanto could "smile chivalry away...
Página 419 - We could never have imagined, had we not seen it fall out in experience, that a man raised up by ourself, and extraordinarily favoured by us above any other subject of this land...
Página 468 - ... one nor the other will willingly make their own retreat. Jesus! what availeth wit, when it fails the owner at greatest need? Do that you are bidden, and leave your considerations for your own affairs. For in some things you had clear commandment, which you did not, and in others none, and did. We princes be wary enough of our bargains. Think you I will be bound by your own speech to make no peace for mine own matters without their consent? It is enough that I injure not their country nor themselves...
Página 85 - Pope, and tempted by the Queen's own subjects, and shall be. so strong by sea, and so free from all other actions and quarrels, — yea, shall be so formidable to all the rest of Christendom, as that her Majesty shall no wise be able, with her own power, nor with aid of any other, neither by sea nor land, to withstand his attempts...
Página 195 - A thin wreath of smoke was seen curling over a slight and smouldering fire upon her deck. Marquis Richebourg, standing on the bridge, laughed loudly at the apparently impotent conclusion of the whole adventure. It was his last laugh on earth. A number of soldiers, at Parma's summons, instantly sprang on board this second mysterious vessel, and occupied themselves, as the party on board the ' Fortune' had done, in extinguishing the flames, and in endeavoring to ascertain the nature of the machine....

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