An inquiry into the authenticity of various pictures and prints, which ... have been offered to the public as portraits of Shakespeare

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Página 3 - This is the monstruosity in love, lady, that the will is infinite, and the execution confined ; that the desire is boundless, and the act a slave to limit.
Página 133 - I can now excuse all his foibles ; impute them to age, and to distress of circumstances; the last of these considerations wrings my very soul to think on. For a man of high spirit, conscious of having, at least in one production, generally pleased the world, to be plagued and threatened by wretches that are low in every sense ; to be forced to drink himself into pains of the body, in order to get rid of the pains of the mind, is a misery.
Página 201 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Página 73 - Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you, Nor think the bitterness of absence sour When you have bid your servant once adieu ; Nor dare I question with my jealous thought Where you may be, or your affairs suppose, But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought Save, where you are how happy you make those. So true a fool is love that in your will, Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill.
Página 73 - I chide the world-without-end hour, Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you, Nor think the bitterness of absence sour, When you have bid your servant once adieu: Nor dare I question with my jealous thought, Where you may be , or your affairs suppose...
Página 85 - I know not by what despondency or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it, so that there was nothing heard or seen but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods ; such a strange consternation there was upon them...
Página 15 - This Figure, that thou here seest put, It was for gentle Shakespeare cut...
Página 69 - Ac ne forte putes me, quae facere ipse recusem, cum recte tractent alii, laudare maligne, ille per extentum funem mihi posse videtur 210 ire poeta, meum qui pectus inaniter angit, irritat, mulcet, falsis terroribus implet, ut magus, et, modo me Thebis, modo ponit Athenis.
Página 48 - Shakespeare, thy gift, I place before my sight ; With awe, I ask his blessing ere I write ; With reverence look on his majestic face; Proud to be less, but of his godlike race.
Página 28 - TO THE MEMORIE OF THE DECEASED AUTHOUR MAISTER W. SHAKESPEARE SHAKE-SPEARE, at length thy pious fellowes give The world thy Workes: thy Workes, by which, out-live Thy Tombe, thy name must: when that stone is rent, And Time dissolves thy Stratford Moniment, Here we alive shall view thee still. This Booke, When Brasse and Marble fade, shall make thee looke Fresh to all Ages...

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